Appalachian Trail Carry

Appalachian Trail Carry

This is a discussion on Appalachian Trail Carry within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I'm starting to plan a trip to hike along AT. We all know the Appalachian trail goes from Georgia to Maine. (ie: many different states ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
  1. #1
    Member Array sig1860's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Pa.
    Posts
    45

    Appalachian Trail Carry

    I'm starting to plan a trip to hike along AT. We all know the Appalachian trail goes from Georgia to Maine. (ie: many different states along the way). When I camp each night, can I use the argument that my Tent / Campsite is an extention of my Home?? and thus be in possesion of my firearm for self defense?? I assume while hiking during the day I would need to separate the ammo and gun and put a lock on the gun. Has this discussion ever come up before? Keep in mind the AT crosses public and private land.

    I know that most of the members will say "just get your ccw that covers most of those states", fine... however what about NY, NJ, Conn., Mass., and the other unfriendly ccw states.


  2. #2
    Member Array GooDoLeBoY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    24
    I wouldn't worry too much about it not too many leos on the trail, hiked it from when i was 10 til i was 18, and never saw a one. yuou are not going to be in a town long enuf too cause any problems, hopefully lol.
    "Welcome to Tennessee, the great state of shootin' stuff." Mark Wahlberg The Shooter
    "It's like killin' roaches, You hafta kill 'em all, otherwise whats the point." Charlie Bronson Death Wish 3

  3. #3
    Member Array dlclarkii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    205
    Considering you'll be leaving the trail and going into towns to shop for grocerries, meet family for mail and money, and possibly using a hotel to get a hot shower, that could be dicey having a gun while off the trail. On the trail I wouldn't be to concerned but off the trail, not sure? Are you sure you're even up for the hike, are you going with another hiker that has already hiked the trail?

  4. #4
    Member Array JohnD13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Upstate, NY
    Posts
    181
    Hiking the trail sounds like a great experience, but carrying in NY or Mass. can get you a mandatory year as a guest of the state. You may not see a single LEO the whole trip, but then you may. And I know that NY doesn't honor any other staes CCW.

  5. #5
    Distinguished Member Array PastorPack's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,572
    The AT is notorious for being dangerous. I have hiked portions of it in VA.

    Hikers be wary: Crime strikes on AT | Lynchburg News Advance

    Violence near the Appalachian Trail recently has raised trail-safety issues, especially in light of warming weather that is enthusing outdoors lovers.

    On May 8, two fishermen were shot while camping a couple miles from a shelter where the suspected gunman killed two Appalachian Trail hikers in 1981.

    On May 3, a female Appalachian Trail hiker told authorities she was abducted and sexually assaulted when a man offered her a ride to the post office in Troutville.

    The U.S. Forest Service has 11 law enforcement officers for 1.8 million acres for the George Washington and Jefferson National forests. The service also has a cooperative agreement with local sheriff’s departments to patrol heavily populated areas, said Eric Smith, a forest service law enforcement officer stationed at Natural Bridge.

    Smith said the forest areas are relatively safe. The bulk of violations right now are off-road vehicle violations, alcohol and drugs, as well as sanitation violations.

    But the officers mainly patrol in their vehicles, not on the hiking trails.

    GVA - Thousands 'Take Back the Trails' on anniversary of campsite murders
    Thousands 'Take Back the Trails' on anniversary of campsite murders

    STONY MAN MOUNTAIN, Va. (AP) -- Julie Williams and Lollie Winans were devoted, experienced hikers in their mid 20s and they knew the Shenandoah National Park is a splendid place to hit the trail this time of year.
    ...Their hands were bound and their throats were slashed. Their bodies were found on June 1, but the killer or killers disappeared without a trace.

    There are certainly many portions of the trail that are no gun zones such as the national park system pockets along the trail. However, more than half of the AT goes through hunting lands, whick means there is a legal way to carry. Depending on how much of it you plan to hike, you may be able to choose your hike for a section that is gun-friendly.

    I won't advocate that you break any laws, but personally I would carry if I were hiking the AT.

    As you're planning your trip, you may want to watch Deliverance.
    God is love (1 John 4:8)

  6. #6
    Member Array dlclarkii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    205
    Quote Originally Posted by PastorPack View Post
    The AT is notorious for being dangerous. I have hiked portions of it in VA.

    Hikers be wary: Crime strikes on AT | Lynchburg News Advance




    GVA - Thousands 'Take Back the Trails' on anniversary of campsite murders



    There are certainly many portions of the trail that are no gun zones such as the national park system pockets along the trail. However, more than half of the AT goes through hunting lands, whick means there is a legal way to carry. Depending on how much of it you plan to hike, you may be able to choose your hike for a section that is gun-friendly.

    I won't advocate that you break any laws, but personally I would carry if I were hiking the AT.

    As you're planning your trip, you may want to watch Deliverance.
    This just may be you in your undies


  7. #7
    Senior Member Array TucAzRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    792
    Quote Originally Posted by GooDoLeBoY View Post
    I hiked it from when i was 10 til i was 18, and never saw a one.

    WOW.. That is a long time to hike.. .

  8. #8
    Member Array sig1860's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Pa.
    Posts
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by dlclarkii View Post
    This just may be you in your undies

    I hear a Banjo playin i'm either runnin, shootin, or both

  9. #9
    Member Array tflhndn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    407
    Also, be careful that much of the trail actually falls under the National Park system, which bans firearms until Feb. 2010

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array tns0038's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,163
    I understand a new Federal Park rule passed, but has not yet took effect. I’d wait until it does. Then if you have a CCL your legal in the Federal Parks.

    I would not hike alone, and I’d avoid MS and NY. All the rest along the way are pretty weapon friendly.

    A good friend of mine broke the trail in to three week hikes, and did the whole trail over a few years. He was a DS so he carried his sidearm the whole way, but never needed it.

  11. #11
    Member Array cz2075bd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    272
    Slightly off topic but if you're going to hike the AT you may enjoy reading the Bill Bryson book on the subject:
    A Walk in the Woods - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Amazon.com: A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail (9780307279460): Bill Bryson: Books

    Normally I would not recommend a book I haven't personally read (sage advice from a wise man), but I have heard nothing but good things about this book, and have enjoyed other books by Bryson.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array f8lranger4x4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    896
    Not to say if it makes you feel better in some areas you can carry on the AT. I have hiked solo many times on the Appalachian trail and never felt the need for a handgun. I feel much safer out their than I do in my own house. because realy if you look at the statistics Murders and crime on the trail is very low and it does add much weight to a pack. I just cant see the need for a firearm on the trail for me at least.

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array cphilip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    2,187
    Dangerous... our Governor went hiking there recently and ended up in Brazil! We call him the "Love Gov" now.

  14. #14
    VIP Member
    Array DaveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    SW Virginia
    Posts
    5,036

    Gun on the AT from the prospective of a long time long distant hiker

    I'm likely to upset some folk here but here goes.

    As I have maintained the AT off and on (whenever I was stationed/living near it or during vacations as a member of a seasonal crew) since '57 and have hiked it, I will jump in.

    First however, let me say that I wish it were legal (anybody, anytime, anywhere) to carry the whole trail. However, it is NOT.

    Although the AT is administrate by the USPS it is not a national park. See the ATC web site on hunting which is relevant to the issue: Hunting and the A.T. - Appalachian Trail Conservancy.

    So, carry consistent with local laws is allowed along 1,250 miles of the Appalachian Trail through national forest lands, national recreation areas, and on state forests and game lands.

    OTOH, carry is PROHIBITED by federal regulation along approximately 900 miles of the Trail through national parks (like Shenandoah and the Great Smoky Mountains), most state parks, and on lands acquired by the National Park Service exclusively for the Appalachian Trail—indicated by A.T. corridor boundary signs -- albeit that will change next February.

    Also see Personal Safety & Awareness Tips for A.T. Hikers - Appalachian Trail Conservancy [WWIIW firearms are discussed about half way down]

    Then we get to the States with no or limited reciprocity. I my case that makes carry prohibited in MD and every state north of PA -- save VT.

    The media's hype of the isolated violence notwithstanding, the trail is a relatively safe place. If you were to take a length of string that represents 2,178 miles and drop it on a map of the east coast states and then research the violent crime along that line, I would bet it would far exceed the violent crime recorded along the AT. The media always projects its own fears on those things that they are unfamiliar with -- both guns and the AT.

    IMHO, it is a very safe place any distance away from the trailheads where nearly all the limited crime takes place. Most criminals are to lazy to work hard enough to hike very far.

    Most of the highly published crimes happens off the trail. For example two fishermen were shot while camping were a couple miles from the trail. (BTW the shelter where the killed two Appalachian Trail hikers in 1981 was moved away from the trailhead for more safety). The media hype should have focused on why he was out of jail after killing two people, not paining a picture of danger along the trail that was two miles away.

    Note that the female Appalachian Trail hiker told authorities she was abducted and sexually assaulted when a man offered her a ride to the post office in Troutville. -- i.e., off the trail hitching a ride into town.

    Julie Williams and Lollie Winans were not hiking the AT. They were not killed on the AT. In 1996, they were killed in the SNP at a campsite one-tenth of a mile from the Skyline Drive and about half a mile from Skyland Lodge, which draws hikers and tourists to its bar, restaurant, and cabins -- after partying at the lodge. Again the media used it to hype DANGER on the AT. Why not danger of being in the National Parks to justify carry by lawful citizens???

    They were only the eighth and ninth murders that have occurred any where along the Appalachian Trail for 12 years --1974-1996. Given the millions of users ever year that's not a high rate.

    BTW -- another one of those seven highly publicized murders was a thru-hiker who was killed at while sleeping it off on a picnic table in the middle of a trail town.

    As far a danger is concerned, you are far more likely to suffer injury from a fall, hypothermia, lightning, hantavirus, giardia lamblia, Lyme's disease, etc than from violent crime. See:Health and Safety - Appalachian Trail Conservancy

    Another consideration is the trail grape vine. There are crowds of hikers. Worst in the thru-hiker bulge than at other time, but still heavy in popular segments all the time. At points you will have very little privacy. Keeping a gun concealed and still available when very hot, when wet, etc will be very difficult. One that is not available is just extra weight. You will be hiking with many anti-RKBA shelter-mates. When an anti makes you, the word will spread. I would expect some anti to report you to the authorities, as the NPS & ATC hype reporting all incidents on the AT. "Suspicious or illegal activity that does not require emergency response should be reported as soon as possible to local rangers or local law-enforcement." See: Reporting an Incident on the A.T. - Appalachian Trail Conservancy


    So, IMHO we have a risk analysis to run.

    Low incident of needing a firearm vs. the very bad repercussions, if caught with one.

    To me, it is not unlike carrying in a post office. Sure I could be attacked going in, or while in one. But the risk of never being able to carry for the rest of my life (even at my age) in more dangerous places outweighs the risk while in a PO. As always, YMMV.

    BTW -- Planning on mail drops? At POs? What's your plan to secure the gun while in a PO?

    BTW2 -- Do I carry on the AT? Yes, where legal and logistically workable. No, where prohibited.
    Last edited by DaveH; August 20th, 2009 at 08:21 PM.
    Μολὼν λαβέ

    I'm just one root in a grassroots organization. No one should assume that I speak for the VCDL.

    I am neither an attorney-at-law nor I do play one on television or on the internet. No one should assumes my opinion is legal advice.

    Veni, Vidi, Velcro

  15. #15
    Senior Member Array cwblanco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Amarillo, Texas
    Posts
    835
    Quote Originally Posted by tns0038 View Post
    I understand a new Federal Park rule passed, but has not yet took effect. I’d wait until it does. Then if you have a CCL your legal in the Federal Parks.
    This is not exactly correct. When the new law goes into effect, it will only mean that if you are legal to conceal carry in the state where the park is situated, then you will be legal to conceal carry in that national park; otherwise, there is no change.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Guy on trail in woods
    By h0kie in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 87
    Last Post: January 10th, 2011, 05:42 PM
  2. No paper trail
    By jdivence in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: November 14th, 2008, 08:38 PM
  3. Gun Hoax on Appalachian State Univ.
    By ncffp163 in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 8th, 2008, 12:13 AM
  4. Appalachian Law School shooting; facts in dispute
    By paramedic70002 in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: April 26th, 2007, 06:21 PM
  5. Appalachian Trail Carry?
    By nate1865 in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: February 26th, 2007, 03:02 PM

Search tags for this page

appalachian trail concealed carry
,
appalachian trail crime
,
appalachian trail crime statistics
,
appalachian trail violent crime
,
can i carry a gun on the appalachian trail
,

can you carry a gun on the appalachian trail

,
carrying a gun on the appalachian trail
,
concealed carry appalachian trail
,
concealed carry on appalachian trail
,
concealed carry on the appalachian trail
,
violence on the appalachian trail
,

violent crime on the appalachian trail

Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors