rechambering? - Page 2

rechambering?

This is a discussion on rechambering? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Once or twice shouldn't cause a noticeable set back with quality ammo IMO. It's not feasible to load a autoloader up and not need to ...

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Thread: rechambering?

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array gottabkiddin's Avatar
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    Once or twice shouldn't cause a noticeable set back with quality ammo IMO. It's not feasible to load a autoloader up and not need to clean and oil it up every other week or so with daily carry, especially the stainless ones. Simply by maintaining your EDC will produce the round in question. Just put it to the bottom of the mag or put it in the box it came in and shoot it at the range the next time you're there.
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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
    Multiple chambering of the same round can certainly cause setback and should be avoided. I curious though. Why would you be chambering and rechambering? It's a sd handgun. Load it up and leave it alone.



    One big problem with that. My EDC is my only handgun. I guess I could just never shoot and hope I hit the BG if the time arises? Practice is for suckers...

    Dont think so.

    Just rotate your ammo, and discard if setback occurs. Simple as that.

  3. #18
    VIP Member Array tns0038's Avatar
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    While current ammo is good from now on, I still always shoot my carry ammo. Reason is moisture, oils from the gun and us can affect the round over time.

    jWhile I understand practicing with cheap ball ammo, my first volley of rounds is with the magazine Iíve been carrying. So set back is never a problem because itís only been racked once.

    When I leave the range, I return home clean and lube the weapon, and then load it with fresh rounds.

  4. #19
    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carver View Post
    manually insert the bullet from your pocket, drop the slide, insert the mag.
    Some guns can handle this, some can't.

    Glock tells us it is a big no no and there are a few stories floating around Defensive Carry about chipped extractors.

  5. #20
    Member Array NCRonB's Avatar
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    Threads like this seem to pop up pretty regularly, but I haven't read any studies on the issue. If a study hasn't been done, it should be.

    I just took a never-chambered round of 9mm Gold Dot 124+P and ran a simple test on it. It measured 1.12" out of the box. I chambered it 20 times in my M&P 9c and after each time it still measured 1.12". I got bored, so I quit. All of my Gold Dot rounds measure within 0.005" of 1.12"; some have been chambered as many as 5 times, but most have not been chambered at all.

    It seems logical that setback would be highly dependent on the round and the gun that's chambering it. I saw a bullet/casing design in a recent ad where the diameter of the bullet inside the casing is smaller than the exposed part of the bullet. That is, there's a small lip to prevent setback altogether. If setback is such a problem, why don't all defensive rounds use that design? Perhaps the manufacturers want setback to be a problem so that people worry about it and continue to buy more ammo.

    Assuming setback is not a factor, is there any other reason that a round should not be trusted after being chambered and extracted many times?

  6. #21
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  7. #22
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    I am so glad I saw this post. I had no idea you should not rechamber the same round and did not realize the risks involved with doing so.

    I rechamber the same round in my second gun at least once per month. I have a G26 we keep by the bed. The cleaning people come once per month so I take the G26, drop the mag, and eject the chambered round. I then take the round that was ejected from the chamber and reload it back in the mag. I then hide the gun and the mag. Once I come back home, I insert the mag and rechamber. The round going back in is the same round I ejected earlier. I have been doing this for months.

    I currently use Corbon +P hollow points for my SD ammo. When I get home tonight, I will rotate out that bullet.

    Thank you for all this information.
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  8. #23
    VIP Member Array David in FL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red82 View Post
    If you're taking that gun to the range and shooting ball ammo and not your SD ammo then you would chamber the round to carry it, then unchamber it to load up your practice ammo. Then reload your SD ammo. If you never go to the range with your SD gun then it's not an issue, but hopefully you are spending quality time at a range regularly.
    That's easily allowed for by rotating the round that's chambered after a range session. Certainly nothing to cause anyone to choose not to carry chambered due to the concern!
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  9. #24
    VIP Member Array David in FL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xader View Post


    One big problem with that. My EDC is my only handgun. I guess I could just never shoot and hope I hit the BG if the time arises? Practice is for suckers...

    Dont think so.

    Just rotate your ammo, and discard if setback occurs. Simple as that.

    Reading is fundamental........ I never said don't practice.

    The OP is asking if he should carry unchambered due to the number of times he chambers and rechambers. That speaks to something a heck of a lot more than a weekly or bi-weekly range trip.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in a grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."

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  10. #25
    Member Array Gunsmoke16's Avatar
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    Yes, it's true. I usually just drop it in the chamber (to prevent it being set-back from running up the feed ramp & the hit at top of hood of barrel) and let the slide go on it from full back. Most guns have no problem with this however, it is not good on a custom trigger job on a 1911 model.
    For those that leave one in the chamber all the time-I like to rotate the stuff on a regular basis. Sometimes oil can seep down the firing pin hole and into the primer pocket of a round, making it a dud. Not good for a self defense gun. I keep the carried rounds in a Ziplock sandwich bag and use them up first at the practice range...thereby always having fresh ammo. Good idea to unload the magazines and let springs rest for a while occasionally (cleaning it and removing any dust-bunnies!). A set-back round will cause excessive high pressure and can explode the barrel when fired, and depending on how well it's mgf, cause parts to fly off. It could hurt your hand or worse yet, sheer the slide right off the frame, sending it back into your head. Also, not good for your noggin. This is one reason I distrust and will not own a .40 caliber as the cup pressure of the round is almost at the breaking point for most metals. If it's not a hammer-forged, heavy duty barrel like Glock it could rupture. Actually know a guy that has blown two Glocks up using hot-loads. It didn't hurt him and just wrung his hand really bad...but he's really lucky. The margin or error reloading a .40 is almost nothing. The first Berrettas that were tested when they got the US military contract suffered slides departing from the frames. Everything had to be remade because it severely "hurt" a few test soldiers. Several +P+ rounds can cause this to happen as well. It doesn't have to be the hottest round to do the job. A lightweight bullet with good expansion usually does better than a hot-loaded one that just passes through the target faster without doing any damage.

  11. #26
    Member Array Cycler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCRonB View Post
    I chambered it 20 times in my M&P 9c and after each time it still measured 1.12".
    I just pulled a winchester RA9T out of my magazine that I know was re-chambered probably 6 to 10 times (before I was aware of this issue) and it too measured the exact same length as several un-chambered rounds.

    I'll still be rotating to a fresh mag, but it seems there's little issue with re-chambering these rounds. I think I'll just measure them every so often to see what's up.

  12. #27
    VIP Member Array Thanis's Avatar
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    I compromise by using a target round as my chambered round. Then the rest of the mag is loaded with SD ammo. Then I always make sure to use the round that was chambered and replace it with a new target round when I go shooting.

    I have three different firearms that I use for CC, and I don't like to leave a round in the chamber when not in use.
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  13. #28
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
    Multiple chambering of the same round can certainly cause setback and should be avoided. I curious though. Why would you be chambering and rechambering? It's a sd handgun. Load it up and leave it alone.
    +++++1111..... Load it and leave it.
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  14. #29
    Ex Member Array scotth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
    I curious though. Why would you be chambering and rechambering? It's a sd handgun. Load it up and leave it alone.
    Yeah, who'd want to clean/re-lube their SELF DEFENSE handgun every once in a while...even if they didn't shoot it. Or, heaven forbid, practice dry fire drills...

    But, I've been re-chambering SD/hollowpoint rounds for many years and never had a problem. With 1911s and Glocks, it's pretty much a straight shot from the top of the mag into the chamber. And, I can pull the slide back and ease it forward to chamber that round. No "letting the slide fly forward" or "slamming" the bullet nose into the feed ramp" is required. Smaller guns are different, but I've been shooting Kel-Tec P3ATs and my Kahr PM9 for years with zero problems from "multiple re-chambered rounds".

  15. #30
    Ex Member Array scotth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunsmoke16 View Post
    Yes, it's true. I usually just drop it in the chamber (to prevent it being set-back from running up the feed ramp & the hit at top of hood of barrel) and let the slide go on it from full back. Most guns have no problem with this however, it is not good on a custom trigger job on a 1911 model.
    You think it's the trigger system that gets effed up from dropping the slide on a chambered round in a 1911? Hooo boy...you got problems... Look up the term EXTRACTOR.

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