Hearing Protection - Page 2

Hearing Protection

This is a discussion on Hearing Protection within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Ear protection is as important and Eye protection....DONT FORGET ABOUT YOUR EYES GUYS AND GALS...

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 82

Thread: Hearing Protection

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Lansing Mi
    Posts
    7,737
    Ear protection is as important and Eye protection....DONT FORGET ABOUT YOUR EYES GUYS AND GALS
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

    Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means, that you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you......


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Under a Volkswagen somewhere in Florida
    Posts
    9,452
    A constant high pitched "eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee" like a beep with no beginning or end. Mine is loud today...perhaps because of the party I had last night. As folks entered the man basement/pool room/bar area all handguns and car keys were locked in the safe until folks left with a safe ride home. I've been to too many parties where alcohol/judgment/tempers get skewwed. All my buddies carry and they are cool, but stuff happens. I may get flamed about locking up their guns, but my house = my rules. If folks don't like it, they can go home. Guns and alcohol don't mix.
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
    No Guns, No Safety, No Peace.

  3. #18
    Member Array oldogy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    East TN&OH
    Posts
    303
    Great post. As an old guy I have moderate to severe hearing loss both ears. 'taint fun. Really dampens my FTF social intercourse.
    As a young man I never used hearing protection and I shot a lot. No hearing protection was used in the military when I was in. Not on the firing line or on the flight line.
    oldogy
    Government is out of control
    "If gun laws in fact worked, the sponsors of this type of legislation should have no difficulty drawing upon long lists of examples of crime rates reduced by such legislation. That they cannot do so after a century and a half of trying -- " Sen Orrin G. Hatch

  4. #19
    Distinguished Member Array GunGeezer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,249
    I too shot a lot as a youngster without hearing protection. I used to come home from the range deaf for up to several days. I now have about 70% loss in my left ear and 40% in my right. Also the constant ringing is pretty disturbing. I wear muffs and plugs all the time now, but the damage has been done.

  5. #20
    Member Array BigBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    268
    I learned the lesson many years ago. A buddy had a model 29 with him, and I had never shot one. Didn't have any muffs with us, but what could one cylinder hurt? My ears rang for 2 days. I use 33db plugs and 28db muffs together. My daughter plays the flute, and I would never want to lose the enjoyment I get from hearing her beautiful playing.
    " In theory, reality and theory are the same. In reality, they are not."

    GLOCK G23, KAHR CW9, RUGER LCP, TAURUS PT92, TAURUS 689, MOSSY 500

    NRA member

  6. #21
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Under a Volkswagen somewhere in Florida
    Posts
    9,452
    Amazingly enough, with the constant ringing driving me bonkers, I only have mild hearing loss. The plugs I use are ribbed rubber with progressively larger ribs. I read somewhere that the percussion can still penetrate through the rubber and cause issues. Any thoughts on that or should I buy a pair of muffs also?
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
    No Guns, No Safety, No Peace.

  7. #22
    VIP Member Array tokerblue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    2,381
    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    Amazingly enough, with the constant ringing driving me bonkers, I only have mild hearing loss. The plugs I use are ribbed rubber with progressively larger ribs. I read somewhere that the percussion can still penetrate through the rubber and cause issues. Any thoughts on that or should I buy a pair of muffs also?
    I always double up on protection (ear plugs + muffs). Gunshots can be upwards of 130db. Ear plugs only reduce the db around 30 or so. That's if you put them in correctly. It's not enough.

    Dangerous Decibels: About Hearing Loss

    Continuous dB - Permissible Exposure Time
    100 db = 15 minutes
    103 db = 7.5 minutes
    106 dB = 3.75 min (< 4min)
    109 dB = 1.875 min (< 2min)
    112 dB = .9375 min (~1 min)
    115 dB = .46875 min (~30 sec)

    I'm extremely protective of my hearing. I love listening to music and I can't imagine not being able to hear it perfectly.

  8. #23
    Moderator
    Array RETSUPT99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    45,505
    My wife and I both use Peltor's...in the $120 range...not the cheapest nor the most expensive...they work very well...protect the ears and stil able to hear instruction at the range.
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

    ***********************************
    Certified Glock Armorer
    NRA Life Member[/B]

  9. #24
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Under a Volkswagen somewhere in Florida
    Posts
    9,452
    Thanks guys...I think I'll invest in a pair of good muffs.
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
    No Guns, No Safety, No Peace.

  10. #25
    VIP Member Array NC Bullseye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NC Foothills
    Posts
    2,723
    Quote Originally Posted by yzcrasher View Post
    I do agree that hearing protection is very important while out at the range. I also suggest everyone shoot without it at least once to fully grasp what the sound will be like if the time arrives.
    Would you also agree that everyone should shoot themselves once to fully grasp what a bullet can do?

    If a single shot can (and it does) cause hearing loss don't loose hearing just to see what it's like.

  11. #26
    VIP Member Array NC Bullseye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NC Foothills
    Posts
    2,723
    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    Thanks guys...I think I'll invest in a pair of good muffs.
    When you get into looking for some good muffs don't overlook Howard Leight. Their Impact Sports are great. I use to use strictly Peltors until I tried the Impact Sports. Now all the Peltors are gone and replaced with the HL electronic muffs. The sound is clearer, the amplification is greater, the cut out is smoother, and the batteries are a ton easier to change than the Peltors. If you dig around you can find them in the $50 plus range.

    If you were closer to the foothills I'd let you try both, it's the easiest way to see what you like.

    Good luck and don't put it off too long.

  12. #27
    Ex Member Array hamlet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    1,290

    Please Read, And Chart Attahed

    From medical site:

    There is a chart enclosed with common sounds, critical level (85 dbl) and decibel level of gun shots - beating noise from commercial jet heard at 100'! Way over 85.

    IF YOU SUFFER SUDDEN HEARING LOSS FROM UNPROTECTED GUN SHOT SOUND; ACOUSTIC TRAUMA; IMMEDIATELY GO TO THE PROPER MEDICAL SPECIALIST. THERE ARE TREATMENTS FOR SUCH CATASTROPHIC SUDDEN LOSS THAT CAN SAVE HEARING IF INITIATED FAST.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Dangerous Decibels focuses on noise-induced hearing loss.

    Decibel ThermometerNoise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL)

    Of the roughly 40 million Americans suffering from hearing loss, 10 million can be attributed to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). NIHL can be caused by a one-time exposure to loud sound as well as by repeated exposure to sounds at various loudness levels over an extended period of time. Damage happens to the microscopic hair cells found inside the cochlea. These cells respond to mechanical sound vibrations by sending an electrical signal to the auditory nerve. Different groups of hair cells are responsible for different frequencies (rate of vibrations). The healthy human ear can hear frequencies ranging from 20Hz to 20,000 Hz. Over time, the hair cell's hair-like stereocilia may get damaged or broken. If enough of them are damaged, hearing loss results. The high frequency area of the cochlea is often damaged by loud sound.

    Sound pressure is measured in decibels (dB). Like a temperature scale, the decibel scale goes below zero. The average person can hear sounds down to about 0 dB, the level of rustling leaves. Some people with very good hearing can hear sounds down to -15 dB. If a sound reaches 85 dB or stronger, it can cause permanent damage to your hearing. The amount of time you listen to a sound affects how much damage it will cause. The quieter the sound, the longer you can listen to it safely. If the sound is very quiet, it will not cause damage even if you listen to it for a very long time; however, exposure to some common sounds can cause permanent damage. With extended exposure, noises that reach a decibel level of 85 can cause permanent damage to the hair cells in the inner ear, leading to hearing loss. Many common sounds may be louder than you think…

    * A typical conversation occurs at 60 dB - not loud enough to cause damage.
    * A bulldozer that is idling (note that this is idling, not actively bulldozing) is loud enough at 85 dB that it can cause permanent damage after only 1 work day (8 hours).
    * When listening to music on earphones at a standard volume level 5, the sound generated reaches a level of 100 dB, loud enough to cause permanent damage after just 15 minutes per day!
    * A clap of thunder from a nearby storm (120 dB) or a gunshot (140-190 dB, depending on weapon), can both cause immediate damage.

    In fact, noise is probably the most common occupational hazard facing people today. It is estimated that as many as 30 million Americans are exposed to potentially harmful sounds at work. Even outside of work, many people participate in recreational activities that can produce harmful noise (musical concerts, use of power tools, etc.). Sixty million Americans own firearms, and many people do not use appropriate hearing protection devices."
    Attached Images

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array varob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,469
    I use Pyramex electronic muffs with disposable foam plugs.

    I also wear these while mowing the grass and when using the weed wacker and blower, power washer and any thing else that exceeds 85 db.
    Don't believe what you hear and only half of what you see!
    -Tony Soprano

  14. #29
    VIP Member Array rammerjammer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Posts
    3,670
    I made the mistake of shooting my .45 once without hearing protection outside. My ears rang for almost 3 weeks after it. I will not make that stupid mistake again.

  15. #30
    Distinguished Member
    Array fastk9dad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Location: Location:
    Posts
    1,554
    I bought the Peltor H10A's. They weren't too expensive ($20 from Amazon) and are rated for 30NNR. I also have foam plugs I can use underneath as well.


Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Hearing protection
    By Kel Dave in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 25th, 2010, 10:58 AM
  2. Hearing Protection?
    By BRTCP88 in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: April 11th, 2010, 08:36 PM
  3. Hearing Protection
    By Draco in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: July 4th, 2007, 02:16 PM
  4. In the ear hearing protection.
    By Bryan in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 6th, 2007, 10:31 AM
  5. Best Hearing Protection
    By tegemu in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 18th, 2006, 03:21 PM

Search tags for this page

conceal ear hearing protection
,
ear plugs nnr34
,
ear protection conceal carry forum
,
hearing damage carrying concealed weapons
,
hearing protection ccw
,
hearing protection concealed carry
,
hearing protection conced carry
,
hearing protection during concealed carry
,
highest rated nrr40 earplugs for snoring
,

is 22nrr enough

,
is 22nrr enough protection for shooting
,
?silencio s&w suppressor muff nrr25 - model: s&w supp
Click on a term to search for related topics.