Marking Your Shells - Page 2

Marking Your Shells

This is a discussion on Marking Your Shells within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I don't concern myself with the minute differences in case volume in handgun or rifle cases because I don't load max loads in either. I've ...

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Thread: Marking Your Shells

  1. #16
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    I don't concern myself with the minute differences in case volume in handgun or rifle cases because I don't load max loads in either. I've never found any benefit to it (other than ego), the accuracy being best with less than max powder loads--in my reloading in my firearms.

    For the sake of consistancy, and liability, publishers od reloading data specify what componets they used to develop their data and any different components used by the individual should envoke the standard "reduce to minimum and increase slowly" rule of reloading. Why a certain publisher chooses a particular name brand case? Don't know. May be as simple as they have a surplus of that brand on hand, past experience has proven that case to be consistant, or the brass maker provides the cases for free.


    Using the same brand-name case for ultra-accurate target shooting only makes sense as consistancy is the name of the game. But we're talking putting 5 shots into one hole at 100 yards which, while the firearm and load is capable, most shooters aren't. My old Rem. 700 .30-06 is capable of sub-inch 100 yards groups with my mixed-case handloads--if I do my part behind the trigger. Some days yes, some days no.


    Now if I were to attempt to load a powder to its max to squeeze every possible FPS of velocity out of a given case, I'd stick to one brand case only for that load.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield


  2. #17
    Member Array gpsxplr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    There's a device (Sorry, don't know the name) that looks like a a hamster cage on a broom handle that will easily pick up cases without bending over. It's about $40 but worth the money if bending over is an issue. Broom and dust pan works; most ranges have them on hand. Most pistols eject to the right rear where it can be found. My biggest gripe is the inconsiderate people who step on my brass without a second thought. I try to keep my cases swept up as neatly as possible.
    This looks like it might be the mentioned device, don't have one but looks useful.
    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/con.../32/Brass_Wand
    "Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both."

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  3. #18
    Member Array celticredneck's Avatar
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    The only reloaders I've known who were really picky about recovering their own brass were serious target shooters who neck size only. Thus each case is fire formed to a specific rifle. Sya the guy was shooting with two different Remington 700s in the same caliber. He would recover the brass from each rifle and make sure to keep the two lots separate. I never saw the need in either pistol loads or deer hunting ammo.

  4. #19
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tubby45 View Post
    For the most part, brass is brass. Just inspect it and reload it.
    With all do respect, I do not think this is sound advice. Keeping brass integrity is vital to know how many times it has been reloaded and fired. This goes a long way to knowing when to discard the brass and start over. Sure, you may get lucky and someone elses brass be ok. But they may also be a reloader who left it for a reason. You do not want to be the one has the case failure and rupture.

    Additionally, brass is made to different tolerances by different manafacturers. A load that you have safetly worked up with a group of componets with brand x brass may be overpressure in brand y brass.
    Brass is not brass, dont do it. Maintain your own, keep good records. Sometimes worn out brass looks ok to the naked eye. As a general rule, I load pistol brass 10 times and discard, if loaded to magnum velocities, I go 8 then discard.

  5. #20
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    My brother in law, fairly new to reloading has a system for everything. First of all he reuses ammo boxes and writes the loading info on them in with magic marker of a specific color...black, red, blue....etc. Then each casing gets a stripe of that color marker. When he picks up his brass at the range he not only knows it is his, but what was loaded into it previously. We shoot at an outdoor range and I'm trying to convince him to just bring a tarp and lay it to the right of him to catch the brass. He's a bit worried about what the other shooters will think. I'm sure that they will think he's just smart about reloading and saving money.

  6. #21
    Member Array EVO80's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tubby45 View Post
    For the most part, brass is brass. Just inspect it and reload it.
    Gotta agree with you on this - pick the brass, clean it, inspect it and if it looks OK reload it. I've never had a problem with this method in all the time I've been reloading (380, 9, 40, 45, 38, 357 and asst rifle calibers).

    BTW - most the commercial ranges I go sell what I and most other refer to as "range ammo." This is reloaded ammo from a commercial reloader (not a private individual). The range buys the ammo from the reloader, picks up the brass after folks shoot it and gets a discount on their next order of range ammo when they return the brass they picked up to the commercial reloader (most commercial reloader do this by the weight of the brass returned - not by the piece).

    The range does not sort through the brass they pick up - it can be brass from the range ammo they sell, name brand brass left behind by folks that don't reload, reloaded brass that a reloader missed, in general, anything. I doubt a commercial reloader sorts brass or does more than inspect it for visual defects (explains why a box of range ammo can have several different head stamps in the same box). There is no way the commercial reloader can keep track of how many times the brass they use has been shot - they clean it, inspect it and if it's OK, reload it and sell it - I doubt they really care how many times the casing has been used. I've yet to hear of any problem range ammo has caused (not saying it hasn't happened - I haven't heard of it) and if it has happened then I would be more than willing to bet the frequency is no more than commercial ammo. JMO
    Last edited by EVO80; January 13th, 2011 at 06:19 PM.

  7. #22
    Distinguished Member Array razor02097's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpsxplr View Post
    This looks like it might be the mentioned device, don't have one but looks useful.
    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/con.../32/Brass_Wand
    Looks like the thing farmers use to pick up nuts from trees...

    http://www.thenutwizard.com/


    When I shoot, I end up just picking up all the .45 brass I see. 90% of the time I'm the only one shooting .45 there anyway.
    There is something about firing 4,200 thirty millimeter rounds/min that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

  8. #23
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Yes I am aware of some range practices of using and selling reloads. Businesses also have great liability policies that will, after litigation, negotiations, and hearings, pay for any damages you may incurr, such as buying you a fake eyeball, or and compensating you for that mangled finger/s that were lost and damaged from faulty ammo. But hell, that's fair ain't it?

    People, do what you want. But in the opinion of someone who has done this a long time, there are two ways to do anything; first class or half assed. Pick your method.

  9. #24
    Member Array sinzitu's Avatar
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    I use a blue sharpie for my rounds that I plan on reloading/recovering after a range trip. Line them up in a shell holder or ammo box and color 1 wide blue stripe.

  10. #25
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    In the final stage of my reloading process, I simply apply inexpensive blue or red nail polish about the seated primer, as well as about the seated bullet or canalure to insure protection against moisture. By doing so, I have accomplished a duel purpose...protection against the elements of air & moisture, plus the added advantage of being able to identify my expended brass.

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