Cartridge Discussion: .32-20

Cartridge Discussion: .32-20

This is a discussion on Cartridge Discussion: .32-20 within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Introduced by Winchester in 1882 as a new chambering for their famous 1873 rifle, the .32-20 or .32 WCF as it was originally called, was ...

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    Cartridge Discussion: .32-20

    Introduced by Winchester in 1882 as a new chambering for their famous 1873 rifle, the .32-20 or .32 WCF as it was originally called, was marketed as a combination small game and deer cartridge for the sportsman. Originally a black powder cartridge loaded with a 115 grain lead bullet, it was easily adaptable to smokeless powder. It was improved further with special high velocity factory loads especially loaded for rifle use only, and then only in certain rifles with strong actions. Colt almost immediately began chambering it in their Model 1873 Single Action Army revolver. The .32-20 remained reasonably popular for the next 60 years, being chambered in both rifles and revolvers by a number of firearms manufacturers.

    Colt occasionally provided arms chambered for Winchester proprietary cartridges in the later part of the 19th century, beginning with the .44 rimfire, also known as the .44 Henry Flat. This low-powered rimfire round appeared during the Civil War chambered in the Henry rifle, and was also used in the Winchester Model 1866 rifle. Colt made the .44 rimfire an available chambering when the firm introduced their Model 1873 revolver. The Winchester Model 1873 introduced the famous .44-40 (.44WCF) and followed up with the .38-40 (.38 WCF) in 1879, and the .32-20 (.32WCF) in 1882. All these cartridges were popular in their day and, as the Colt SAA could readily be adopted for them, Colt followed Winchester’s lead, providing handguns that would accept these handy cartridges.

    I consider the .32-20 to be one of my very favorite cartridges. This cute little centerfire round offers a level of performance that is almost unique in any line-up of cartridges available to the shooting sports enthusiast in the 21st century. It offers low recoil in either rifle or revolver and is highly effective for small game hunting and varmint control at ranges out to 100 yards. In this modern age one must handload in order to make the best use of the .32-20. It is the handloader’s friend and may be tailored to deliver much better performance and economy. It makes a good combination cartridge for rifle and handgun.

    The .32-20 As a Rifle Cartridge

    I get a kick out of using such a small centerfire cartridge on my wanderings afield. The .32-20 is my favored companion at our old home place or on a deer lease. I’ve used it to take rabbits and squirrels and to lay low the varmints encountered. It won’t destroy as much meat as the .22 Hornet or even the .22 Magnum rimfire round but is just as good a killer. If one handloads, it can be a very inexpensive round to produce. If one casts his bullets, it is scarcely more expensive to shoot than the .22 Long Rifle. It may be hotrodded to the point of attaining over 2000 fps with a 100 grain jacketed bullet if one is using a suitable rifle. This brings the .32-20 into the performance category of the .30 Carbine round.

    I have used such loads in a Winchester Model 92 carbine and also a scoped Marlin Model 1894 CL. These loads still wouldn’t make the .32-20 the deer round originally envisioned by Winchester all those years ago. The high velocity load gives a little flatter trajectory but still only makes the round suitable for shots out to about 150 yards. This high velocity load is not a top choice if one wants to obtain small game for the pot for it will disassemble eatable game. A better choice is a flat nosed or semi-wadcutter lead bullet either purchased or home cast, weighing between 90 grains and 115 grains. The lead SWC bullets made for the .32 S&W Long or for the .32 H&R Magnum are great in a good .32-20 rifle with a mild charge of fast burning powder. Launched at 1100 to 1400 feet per second, these are the loads I enjoy most. The .32-20 may well be the best centerfire plinking round ever though up.

    I have kept a .32-20 Winchester Model 1892 carbine for many years. Back around 1990 Marlin introduced the .32-20 chambering in their Model 1894 lever-action rifle. I was one of the first in line to order one when they were announced. I thought to put the Winchester into semi-retirement and let the Marlin bear the brunt of .32-20 shooting. I also intended to mount a scope on the Marlin to see what could be accomplished with the .32-20 from the bench rest.

    This was my first Marlin product and I'm sad to say that it just didn't work out. The one I received had a host of issues. The workmanship was so-so. The trigger was dreadfully hard and heavy. I put the scope on it and couldn't get it to shoot well with any load I tried. The 100+ year old Winchester with open sights and an imperfect bore would handily beat the scoped Marlin, shooting better groups at 100 yards from the bench rest. I finally determined that the Marlin's barrel had been rifled over a large flaw in the bore just in front of the chamber. Marlin offered to fix it under warranty but I was so discouraged with the rifle that I left it in the back of a closet for 10 years, finally selling it to a friend who wanted it for a rebarreling project to a .357 Magnum.

    A good .32-20 rifle could be pressed into service as a short range self defense weapon. With factory loads it looks to be equal to the 7.65 Mauser or the 7.65 Tokorev. With a high velocity handload it would be similar to the .30 Carbine.

    Marlin makes runs of their Model 1894 CL in .32-20 and Browning and Winchester both fielded modern versions of the Model 1892 rifle in .32-20. The Marlin may currently be the only new firearm available for the cartridge. There are lots of classic oldies chambered for .32-20. Some are pricey and some are very reasonable. Winchester, Colt Remington, Marlin, Savage and others made rifles in the round. Some attractive bolt action models may be had, along with single shot rifles, and even some slide action rifles may occasionally be found.

    The .32-20 As a Revolver Cartridge

    The .32-20 revolver makes a great field companion when holstered on one’s belt. I’ve taken small game and shot pests with mine. One may safely handload most .32-20 revolvers to slightly exceed the performance of the .32 H&R Magnum cartridge. I’ve noticed that the .32-20 is capable of excellent accuracy when employed on paper targets at the range. I have a load using the 90 grain Hornady lead SWC that makes satisfyingly tight, round groups and is so pleasant to shoot. It cuts a neat round hole in the paper and has cut a neat round hole in the head of a rattlesnake on occasion.

    A .32-20 revolver would be a suitable self-defense weapon which could be utilized in a pinch. It can beat out the .32 H&R Magnum and can be marginally improved by handloading.

    The interest in the Colt SAA replicas has benefited the enthusiast who is interested in acquiring newly manufactured revolvers chambered in the .32-20. Several Single Action Army clones are marketed in this round and I notice that the Colt Custom Shop will provide .32-20 versions of their original Model 1873 revolver. Lots of used .32-20 revolvers are out there which should be acquired and put back to work. Besides the original Colt single action, one may find other early 20th century Colt double action revolvers such as the Army Special and the Police Positive Special. Smith & Wesson provided their K frame Military and Police model in .32-20 from 1899 until 1940. A small number of these revolvers featured adjustable sights. These Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers are not hard to come by and not expensive. A tight gun with a good bore and some honest wear is what one is looking for if one wants to shoot .32-20. Leave the condition rarities and their high prices for the collectors.

    I have a 30’s vintage Smith & Wesson Military and Police .32-20 revolver with a 4 inch barrel. This is a very nice revolver, displaying fine workmanship and a deep blue finish. It is very tight and has an excellent trigger, both in single action and double action mode. It is very accurate. For many years I had a nickled companion to this piece that was made in 1906. It was also very accurate but as the nickel finish was rather ragged it went away.

    The Thompson Center Contender may be had with a barrel chambered for .32-20. As I understand it, this barrel is in .308 bore diameter rather than the original .312 diameter of the cartridge. A Contender equipped with this barrel could accurately use the lighter weight .308 component bullets available.

    A Cartridge With a Split Personality

    There’s .32-20’s and then there’s .32-20’s! The original featured 20 grains of black powder. It was suitable for early primitive rife actions and handguns that were made of simple steels with little heat-treating processes. Mention has been made of the high velocity factory loads once available but which are now long gone. Beginning with the Winchester Model 1885 single shot designed by John M. Browning, and continuing with the Winchester Model 1892 also of Browning design, the .32-20 was now housed in some rifles that were engineered to stand higher pressures than black powder generated. In the 20th century Remington, Winchester, and Savage made some nifty bolt action and slide action rifles that were amply strong enough to take advantage of the ballistics that the high velocity smokeless loadings could afford. All factory high-velocity .32-20 ammunition is now long discontinued but some of these old higher-pressure factory loads are occasionally found and should not be considered suitable for early rifle designs or for any handgun.


    Winchester Model 1892 manufactured in 1896

    Good .32-20 Rifles and Handguns

    Winchester
    Model 1873 lever action
    Model 1885 single shot (Low-wall for mild loads--High-wall for HV loadings)
    Model 1892 lever action*
    Model 53 lever action*
    Model 43 bolt action*

    Browning
    Model 53 (copy of Winchester Model 53)*

    Remington
    Rolling Block single shot
    Model 25 pump*

    Marlin
    Model 1893 lever action
    Model 1894 CL lever action*

    Savage
    Model 23C bolt action*

    Stevens
    No. 44 single shot

    Colt
    Model 1873 Single Action Army
    Model 1878 Double Action
    New Navy
    Army Special
    Police Positive Special
    Lightning Model slide action rifle

    Smith & Wesson
    Hand Ejector Military & Police

    Thompson Center Contender w/.32-20 barrel*

    *Suitable for high velocity loadings


    Smith & Wesson Hand Ejector from 1930


    Some Chronograph Data

    Handgun data

    77 gr. Remington metal case (for .32 ACP), Unique, MV 1362 ME 317
    80 gr. Remington lead round nose, Unique MV 909 ME 146
    90 gr. Hornady lead SWC, Unique MV 969 ME 188 ES 41
    100 gr.Remington JSP No. B22810, Unique MV 932 ME 215
    " ", Unique+.5gr. MV 1180 ME 309
    " ", IMR4227 MV 1341 ME 399
    100 gr. Remington lead No. B22822, Unique MV 1249 ME 346
    " ", Unique MV 873 ME 160
    115 grain cast lead, Unique MV 764 ME 149
    " " Goex FFG MV 846 ME 183

    Rifle data

    85 gr. Hornady JHP, H110, MV 2143 ME 865 ES 31
    " ", IMR 4227 MV 1939 ME 708 ES 52
    " ", Unique MV 1365 ME 351 ES 34
    90 gr. Hornady lead SWC, Unique MV 1509 ME 455 ES 41
    100 gr. Remington lead No. B22822, Unique MV 1227 ME 330
    100 gr. Remington JSP No. B22810, H110 MV 2008 ME 890 ES 40
    " ", IMR 4227 MV 1792 ME 711 ES 54
    " ", Unique MV 1233 ME 337 ES 65
    115 gr. cast lead, Unique MV 1180 ME 356
    " " Goex FFG MV 1256 ME 402

    Handgun used: Smith&Wesson Military & Police w/4-inch barrel
    Rifle used: Winchester Model 1892 with 20-inch barrel
    Oehler Model 12 chronograph

    I dislike revealing exact handloading data on a forum format. Anyone seeking more detailed information may contact me through the Forum email feature.

    Though I've experimented with handloads, I don't make use of the high velocity loads shown above as I don't want to risk firing one in the revolver. Besides, they are really outside the spirit of the .32-20 and it's use as a fun cartridge.

    This Round Deserves More Attention Than It Receives.

    I wish that demand would cause more arms to be offered in this round. The .32-20 is a fine cartridge with which to relax on a lazy afternoon. Sort of a centerfire version of a .22. The only other round that might be similar is the .25-20WCF but it isn’t chambered in handguns. I have firearms for various “serious” purposes. I like having .32-20’s just for bumming around when I want something more than a .22 Long Rifle. It is a good round with which to unwind, chill out, and take a break from louder, harder kicking weapons. A serious cartridge for those who are serious about their shooting relaxation.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893


  2. #2
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    It that cartridge always reminds me of "All the Pretty Horses," because an 1873 Colt in that caliber makes an appearance. I always thought it was a bit quirky to be in there, but it is a great book.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
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    I do love your 'historical' posts... thank you!
    Smitty
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    YouTube - 32-20 Blues [Remastered] ROBERT JOHNSON (1936) Delta Blues Guitar Legend


    ".32-20 Blues"

    I sent for my baby and she don't come.
    I sent for my baby, man, and she don't come.
    All the doctors in Hot Springs sho' can't help her none.

    An' if she gets unruly, thinks she don't want do.
    If she gets unruly and thinks she don't want do.
    Take my .32-20 and cut her half in two.

    She got a .38 Special but I b'lieve it's most too light.
    She got a .38 Special but I b'lieve it's most too light.
    I got a .32-20, got to make the camps alright.

    If I sent for my baby, man, and she don't come.
    If I sent for my baby, man, and she don't come.
    All the doctors in Hot Springs sure can't help her none.

    I'm gonna shoot my pistol, gonna shoot my Gatlin Gun.
    I'm gonna shoot my pistol, gonna shoot my Gatlin Gun.
    You made me love you, now yo' man have come.

    Aw baby, where you stay last night?
    Ah, baby, where you stay last night?
    Ya' got your hair all tangled and you ain't talkin' right.

    Got a .38 Special, boys, it do very well.
    Got a .38 Special, boys, it do very well.
    I got a .32-20 now and its a burnin' hell.

    If I sent for my baby, man, and she don't come.
    If I sent for my baby, man, and she don't come.
    All the doctors in Wisconsin sure can't help her none.

    Hey hey baby, were'd you stay last night.
    Hey hey baby, were'd you stay last night.
    You didn't come home 'til the sun was shinin' bright.

    Ah boys, I just can't take my rest.
    Ah boys, I just can't take my rest.
    With this .32-20 layin' up and down my breast.


    Recorded in San Antonio, Texas in November of 1936
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

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    Very cool info on a part of our history

    Kind of ironic, since I recently watched Winchester '73 lately

    Guns & history; like peas and carrots
    Trust in God and keep your powder dry

    "A heavily armed citizenry is not about overthrowing the government; it is about preventing the government from overthrowing liberty. A people stripped of their right of self defense is defenseless against their own government." -source

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    .32-20 AMmo

    I have a Winchester 1892 (.32 W.C.F.) and I am having a difficult time finding ammo. Can you recommend a good source? Thanks.

    PS ... Great article

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    Hi JeanBFE, and welcome to the Forum. Thanks for liking the article.

    Those Winchester '92s are really fine rifles with a sturdy action design that feeds so smoothly. Much slicker than a Winchester 94. They are wonderful for use with the .32-20 cartridge.

    I handload for the .32-20 so don't purchase new ammunition with any frequency. The .32-20 wasn't difficult to find on the shelves of ammunition dealers 20+ years ago and was scarcely any more expensive than the .38 Special in its common loadings. Now the manufacturers seem to want to charge the proverbial "arm and a leg" for the plain ol' lead bullet load. Some shopping for internet sources can find a deal.

    It's worth it to shoot the .32-20. It's great for plinking or hiking. With mind handloads I use it almost like a center fire version of a .22 Long Rifle and it is not too much more expensive. You might want to consider getting into handloading if you don't do so already. After you obtained a supply of cases you could prepare loads for your rifle with any .311"/.312" diameter pistol type bullets out there including taking advantage of bulk packed cast lead bullets intended for the .32 S&W. These are generally a bit cheaper to purchase 500 at a time than other larger diameter cast lead bullets. Or, you can go all out and cast your own. I have the ability to cast bullets for .32-20 but haven't heated a mold in some years.

    I've used Gad to obtain reloading components for some obsolete cartridges more difficult to find than the .32-20. He also sells loaded ammunition and his prices aren't so bad. He knows his business.
    Gad Custom Reloaded Cartridges and Shell Reloading Services


    Black Hills can supply loaded .32-20 ammunition and the examples I've seen at gun shows seem a little less expensive than the big name brand manufacturers' product.
    Cowboy Action Calibers | Black Hills Ammunition | American Made Excellence Since 1981


    I just popped onto the internet and found this site. Seems to show suppliers and price ranges sorted from low to high. Some are quite low. The velocity quoted on the one with the lowest price was taken from a handgun. Most current .32-20 ammunition seems to give 1100-1300 fps when fired over a chronograph from a rifle.
    .32-20 Win (.32 WCF, .32-20 Marlin, .32 Colt Lightning) rifle ammo ammunition - AmmoSeek.com


    There are probably more sites who would love to sell you some .32-20.

    Here's the Google page I checked out.
    .32-20 ammo for sale - Google Search

    If you could post some photos of your Winchester .32-20, it would be nice to see it. If you get to shoot it, let us know what you think.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

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    New Member Array JeanBFE's Avatar
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    Thank you for your prompt response! I'll take a couple of photos and post them if you would like to see the rifle. It was my father's. I've had it since he passed away in 1980. I have shot the rifle a few times, many, many years ago and I remember liking it then. I don't reload although that would be useful to know at some point in the future. Sure wish I had some friends in this area who were in to that kind of thing.

    I just want to sight it in and do a little target practice for now. Thanks for all the links. Plenty of choices. How much difference is there between the different grain? Is there anything in particular you would recommend? Is there any problem with any of the new loads for an old rifle like this?

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    Bryan, you never cease to amaze me with your knowledge and articulate posts. I am familiar with the dandy little cartridge, but have no practical experience with it.
    Col Townsend Whelen in a rare copy of a hard back Field and Stream Outdoorsmen handbook I own dated 1936, stated of the 32-20 ", as for a seasoned outdoorsmen, there is no such fairer, more useful handgun to have in camp, then a pistol chambered for the 32-20 calibre Colt."
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    It would be an honor for the Forum to get to see that rifle which you obtained from your father. Please do post some photos if possible.

    I LOVE old Winchesters!

    I've used bullets as light as 71 grains(for the .32 ACP) to 85 grains but they do tend to shoot a little low at 15 to 25 yards in my revolver and at 50 yards in my rifle. The bullets weighing 100 to 115 grains seem to shoot to about the same point of impact at these distances, which happens to be the point of aim for the revolver. The heavy bullets will impact a bit high at 50 yards in my rifle if it is sighted in for the Hornady 90 grain lead SWC bullet but at 100 yards the 90, 100, and 115 grain lead bullets all hit about dead on. I love using the little Hornady 90 grain lead semi-wadcutter, designed for the .32 S&W Long because it is so accurate in the revolver, but a fellow could be completely satisfied with any 100 to 115 grain bullet, lead or jacketed, especially in the rifles.

    With the rifle, running the velocities way up beyond the original factory speeds wreaks more havoc with bullet impact differences than do the various weights of bullets available. One may gain some really useful velocities and with safety in the Winchester Model 1892 but such loads must be kept out of handguns.



    "How much difference is there between the different grain?"

    Just a bug in your ear but "weight," as in "different bullet weights" would be most appropriate here rather than "different grain." Grain is commonly used in English speaking nations to designate a particular unit of weight. Does that make any sense at all? For instance, one would not inquire "what pound are you" or "how much did that big fish pound?" It seems more and more common for folks to use the terms interchangeably which is really incorrect usage. No big deal but just want you to look like an "old hand" with the lingo.


    Shucks, Chuck.

    I just love the old cartridge. I'd love to have a Colt so chambered too. In fact, I wouldn't be at all surprised if at some future date, a 6-inch Colt Army Special or Official Police in .32-20 didn't find its way into the menagerie here. Would love to have a Colt Single Action Army but I'm probably out of the Single Action Army collecting business with their current prices.
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    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

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    Excellent as usual, Bryan, thank you!

    Always had a soft spot for the 25/20 and 32/20 Winchester 92s, the only ones they made that had both rifle and carbine features in one gun.
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    "Always had a soft spot for the 25/20 and 32/20 Winchester 92s, the only ones they made that had both rifle and carbine features in one gun."

    True, that. Though I wonder why. They didn't want to make barrel bands to fit the slimmer barrels and magazine tubes? That doesn't seem reasonable for a facility with the manufacturing capabilities they had.
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    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

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    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  13. #13
    OD*
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    True, that. Though I wonder why. They didn't want to make barrel bands to fit the slimmer barrels and magazine tubes? That doesn't seem reasonable for a facility with the manufacturing capabilities they had.
    Excellent question, Bryan, and one I've never gotten a good answer to. Yours sounds as plausible as any, actually.
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    "The pistol, learn it well, carry it always ..." ~ Jeff Cooper

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    Member Array Archie's Avatar
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    I've a Savage bolt rifle in .32-20. I like it as a 'walking around' gun. As you say, cheap to reload, although one must pay attention or crumple cases in the process. Powder on the order of 2400 or H110 seems to speed 100-115 grain bullet along and with good small game accuracy.

    And it is just cooler than a lot of new small bore rifles.
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    A Savage Model 23 .32-20 is way cool! I'd love to have one to play with. It could handle any reasonable load and are suppose to have more accuracy potential than lever actions. They have a small but fierce cult following these days. It's a shame such a rifle isn't still produced for they can be a lot of fun. These days everything has to be serious and tactical.
    Charter Member of the DC .41 LC Society

    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

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