.357 sig choices - Page 2

.357 sig choices

This is a discussion on .357 sig choices within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; The 357 Sig caters to the lighter bullets and the .40 S&W caters to the heavier bullets. The .357 sig does something at 124 & ...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 24 of 24
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: .357 sig choices

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Thanis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    2,366
    The 357 Sig caters to the lighter bullets and the .40 S&W caters to the heavier bullets.

    The .357 sig does something at 124 & 125 weight that 40 S&W really can't. They curve about the same for a while, then you get to the 135 to 140 gr range and the 40 S&W does something the .357 can't really do as well. The factors include accuracy, power, penetration, etc. However the .357 sig loses vs the 40 s&w at a quicker rate. The .357 sig is a great round from a semi-auto that matches the potential of the .357 mag in a revolver.

    So the simple thought process with .357 sig is keep around 125 gr for sd, up to 140 gr for 4 leg concerns, knowing you are giving up some of the inherent accuracy and penetration with greater weight. Most .357 sig firearms have a 40 S&W barrel drop in switch if you want a heaver round.

    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    You see a lot of the 125 grain stuff because it has the best balance of speed and weight and it mimics the .357 load that the desingers were trying to duplicate when they thought up the .357 Sig...
    +1

    The .357 sig is a very accurate, penetrates well, and simply one of my favorite rounds, but it is a round designed to be like something at 125 gr, not 140 gr+.
    NRA Member
    S&W 642 (no-lock) with .38 Spl +P 135 GR Gold GDHP
    Glock G31 & G33 with .357 Sig 125 GR. SXT Winchester Ranger


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array Thanis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    2,366
    NRA Member
    S&W 642 (no-lock) with .38 Spl +P 135 GR Gold GDHP
    Glock G31 & G33 with .357 Sig 125 GR. SXT Winchester Ranger

  3. #18
    VIP Member Array Thanis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    2,366
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron1100us View Post
    I was just curious because I often read on here to carry the heaviest bullet for whatever caliber for more penetration. If the 125 grain is better than the 147 grain, I'll stick to that. What are your opinions?...
    Everything I've read concerning .357 sig is that the 125 gr range penetrates more and is more accurate than the 140 gr. 9mm 125 gr small bullet flying faster with less resistance when target hit with optimal power given design.

    I'm not a ballastic expert, so if I'm wrong, look forward to the read.
    NRA Member
    S&W 642 (no-lock) with .38 Spl +P 135 GR Gold GDHP
    Glock G31 & G33 with .357 Sig 125 GR. SXT Winchester Ranger

  4. #19
    Distinguished Member Array 21bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    ky.
    Posts
    1,890
    I have had a 357sig pistol for quite a long time. I have never felt under gunned to a .40s&w. On the contrary my experience has been that friends of mine that have switched barrels from 40 to .357 have never switched back.

  5. #20
    VIP Member Array Thanis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    2,366
    The .357 sig, at the right gr, is considered inherently accurate than 40 S&W, with marginal overall increase SD performance vs 2 legs.

    Quote Originally Posted by 21bubba View Post
    I have had a 357sig pistol for quite a long time. I have never felt under gunned to a .40s&w. On the contrary my experience has been that friends of mine that have switched barrels from 40 to .357 have never switched back.
    Has nothing to do with being under gunned. There are some things the .357 sig does better & somethings the 40 S&W does better. The heavier the round beyond 124 gr to 125 gr, the .357 sig begins to lose its designed advantage vs 40 S&W.

    The three major disadvantages ofen stated concerning the .357 sig vs 40 s&w (when not considering gr) is snap / recoil, over-penetration, and set-back.

    The .357 sig is a bit snappy vs 40 s&w. Marginal edge to 40 S&W on 2nd shot depending on shooter skill.

    Over-penetration can be bad, under-penetration can be far worse.

    The greatest concern I have concerning the .357 sig round is bullet set-back. I have seen .357 sig Glocks and Sigs that can set back a round. Last time I personally observed this was earlier this year. Most don't on the first time, a few do, but after a time, and depending on how hard it is done, chambering the same round is more likely to cause a set back at some point with a .357 sig more than other calibers. Sometimes it is the gun, sometimes the ammo, sometimes the shooter, etc. All are variables, but in general the .357 sig is more likey to set back than a 40 s&w.
    NRA Member
    S&W 642 (no-lock) with .38 Spl +P 135 GR Gold GDHP
    Glock G31 & G33 with .357 Sig 125 GR. SXT Winchester Ranger

  6. #21
    Distinguished Member Array clarkston_cz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Lewis-Clark Valley
    Posts
    1,635
    Some people like 147 gr 9mm and some like the lighter loads.

    That said:

    For those in lov with the 147 for carry..
    Any 147 gr. 9mm bullet pushed almost 200 fps (or more) in .357 SIG form can't be bad at all.

  7. #22
    Distinguished Member Array 21bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    ky.
    Posts
    1,890
    Quote Originally Posted by Thanis View Post
    The .357 sig, at the right gr, is considered inherently accurate than 40 S&W, with marginal overall increase SD performance vs 2 legs.



    Has nothing to do with being under gunned. There are some things the .357 sig does better & somethings the 40 S&W does better. The heavier the round beyond 124 gr to 125 gr, the .357 sig begins to lose its designed advantage vs 40 S&W.

    The three major disadvantages ofen stated concerning the .357 sig vs 40 s&w (when not considering gr) is snap / recoil, over-penetration, and set-back.

    The .357 sig is a bit snappy vs 40 s&w. Marginal edge to 40 S&W on 2nd shot depending on shooter skill.

    Over-penetration can be bad, under-penetration can be far worse.

    The greatest concern I have concerning the .357 sig round is bullet set-back. I have seen .357 sig Glocks and Sigs that can set back a round. Last time I personally observed this was earlier this year. Most don't on the first time, a few do, but after a time, and depending on how hard it is done, chambering the same round is more likely to cause a set back at some point with a .357 sig more than other calibers. Sometimes it is the gun, sometimes the ammo, sometimes the shooter, etc. All are variables, but in general the .357 sig is more likey to set back than a 40 s&w.
    How can you state that a 125gr. 357Sig round loses it's design advantage with heavier bullets when it was DESIGNED to shoot 125gr. bullets not the heavier ones. This can probably be said for a lot of calibers. You're comparing oranges and tangerines.

    Recoil is in the hand of the beholder
    Over penetration is too situational to be able to make a comparasion.
    Set back can happen with any round. I will agree that early 357Sig rounds were more prone to suffer it. Not so much anymore.

  8. #23
    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    The Valley of the Sun, AZ
    Posts
    1,018
    Quote Originally Posted by clarkston_cz View Post
    Some people like 147 gr 9mm and some like the lighter loads.

    That said:

    For those in lov with the 147 for carry..
    Any 147 gr. 9mm bullet pushed almost 200 fps (or more) in .357 SIG form can't be bad at all.
    It's very difficult to find a reliable 147gr .357 SIG loading. The folks at Winchester and ATK (Federal/Speer) tested all the popular 9mm bullet weights (115, 124, 147) and the popular .357 Magnum weights (125, 158), and they found the 125gr load to be the most reliable, with 147gr bullets having major problems with jacket/core separation.

    So yes, it is bad!
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

    “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress and grows brave by reflection.” ― Thomas Paine

  9. #24
    Member Array R.W.Dale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    ar
    Posts
    86
    I carry 125g Winchester ranger jhp's in my glock 32.

    I recently chronographed this load and was pleasantly surprised to find it beating the 1350 fps factory velocity claim by 20 fps

    posted via tapatalk using android.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

.357 sig 147 grain
,
147 grain 357 sig
,

357 sig 147 grain

,
357 sig 147 xtp
,
357 sig 147gr jhp
,
357 sig ammo choices
,
357 sig ballistics
,
357 sig hst
,
does kimber make a 357 sig
,
hornady 357 sig 147gr xtp
,
kimber .357 sig
,

kimber 357 sig

Click on a term to search for related topics.