ammo question

This is a discussion on ammo question within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I carry the cor-bon dpx 115 grain 9mm +p in my CCW, I have noticed that after several times chambering the same round that I ...

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    Member Array 97tbird's Avatar
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    ammo question

    I carry the cor-bon dpx 115 grain 9mm +p in my CCW, I have noticed that after several times chambering the same round that I am able to rotate the bullet in the casing. I have taken these rounds out of service, since I assume that this could be an issue. Am I correct? Or could I still fire the rounds, even just for practice? Thanks in advance!!!!
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    As long as they are not set back, you can fire them for practice, but I wouldn't carry them.

    Hurts to pay so much for them things just to see them get screwed up from chamberings them don't it?

    My advice is to go you a 50 round box of a good name brand like Federal, or Winchester. Less money and will do the job.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 97tbird View Post
    I carry the cor-bon dpx 115 grain 9mm +p in my CCW, I have noticed that after several times chambering the same round that I am able to rotate the bullet in the casing. I have taken these rounds out of service, since I assume that this could be an issue. Am I correct? Or could I still fire the rounds, even just for practice? Thanks in advance!!!!
    I never use a round in my carry gun that's been chambered more than once. Any round chambered more than once moves into my training ammo stockpile. When I go to the range, I remove my carry mag and leave the round that I chambered in the chamber and shoot it.

    This isn't necessary in regards to SD pistol ammo, but is a MUST DO with ALL SD/Hunting/HD/Duty rifle/carbine ammo which is why I practice it with my SD pistol ammo as well. I don't like creating bad habits.

    You should NEVER EVER use a round that's been chambered more than three times for SD. The last thing you need in an SD situation is a FTF on the first shot, as the first shot is ALWAYS the most important shot.

    Hope that helps.
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    Ex Member Array Yankeejib's Avatar
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    Why does chambering make a round go bad?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yankeejib View Post
    Why does chambering make a round go bad?
    The impact of the bullet nose hitting the feed ramp will sometimes cause loosening and setback resulting in greater pressure.
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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    You should NEVER EVER use a round that's been chambered more than three times for SD. The last thing you need in an SD situation is a FTF on the first shot, as the first shot is ALWAYS the most important shot.
    I buy Wichester Ranger T-series ammo for SD,even after chambering a 230 grain cartridge 10 times I experienced no setback,the only time my chamber is cleared is to clean the weapon,or to swap out ammo for target shooting.IMHO some calibers are more prone to setback due to bullet shape and the angle of the feed ramp the bullet hits.
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    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msgt/ret View Post
    The impact of the bullet nose hitting the feed ramp will sometimes cause loosening and setback resulting in greater pressure.
    Yep, and this can cause a KABOOM!
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

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    Quote Originally Posted by dukalmighty View Post
    I buy Wichester Ranger T-series ammo for SD,even after chambering a 230 grain cartridge 10 times I experienced no setback,the only time my chamber is cleared is to clean the weapon,or to swap out ammo for target shooting.IMHO some calibers are more prone to setback due to bullet shape and the angle of the feed ramp the bullet hits.
    It's not as big of a deal for .45 ACP as it's a very low pressure caliber.
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

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    VIP Member Array Majorlk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dukalmighty View Post
    I buy Wichester Ranger T-series ammo for SD,even after chambering a 230 grain cartridge 10 times I experienced no setback,the only time my chamber is cleared is to clean the weapon,or to swap out ammo for target shooting.IMHO some calibers are more prone to setback due to bullet shape and the angle of the feed ramp the bullet hits.
    My experience, too. I have repeatedly chambered the same round several times on both Winchester and Federal and the amount of setback is less than .005 inch. I've measured OAL variations greater than that when comparing across different lots.
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    And then there's the smart-iky response.

    I've chambered the same ammo countless times. Just over and over and over and it never develops looseness, has bullets become deep-seated, gets out of spec., or wears out. It's always as perfect as it was when I opened the box for the first time or when it came out of the loading press.

    Revolvers are that way about their ammo.


    Seriously,

    Don't take chances. The advice given by other members above is first rate. If overall cartridge length is the same, though the bullet is loose in the case, then the cartridge may be fired if you can get it in the chamber without cycling it from the magazine through the action. A loose bullet might stay put in its case, keeping cartridge overall length within spec. or it might be pushed deeper into the cartridge case when cycled through the action. Sometimes bullets can become quite deep-seated. Fast burning pistol powders can and will misbehave in a most unbridled and immoderate way if compressed beneath a bullet that has occupied too much of the cartridge case with them. Ka-booms are known to occur and with disastrous results to both equipment and appendages. If I noticed a loose bullet I would single load it "down the spout," in other words, place it directly in the chamber. Some semi-auto pistols including many 1911s don't like this mistreatment of their extractors that occurs when single loading cartridges in this fashion. My old loosy-goosy military contract models don't care.

    If in doubt, don't shoot a impaired cartridge.

    With revolvers, a loose bullet could still be a problem. It's possible for the bullet to become backed out of the case due to bullet inertia during recoil. With proper crimps this is not a problem but a loose bullet can't be said to be properly crimped. When the revolver recoils, the loose bullet stays put while the cartridge case recoils backward with the revolver, effectively pulling the bullet from its cartridge case. Inertia can work so well and the recoil can move the revolver back far enough that the bullet ends up "staying put" clear out past the front of the chamber, partially protruding from the front of the cylinder of the revolver. Within a couple of shots, the shooter will find that his cylinder will not turn because it is being hindered by a bullet that is either butting against the revolver's frame beneath the cylinder or else butting against the revolver's barrel shank. Such a condition is not conducive for repeat fire.

    Sometimes one may find that he can turn a bullet in a cartridge even though the crimp won't allow him to push or pull the bullet. This is due to the case mouth being pushed into the bullet's sides during the crimping operation. While such a bullet probably wouldn't back out from inertia during recoil, one wouldn't want to rely on it for self-defense ammunition carried for serious purposes in either revolver or semi-auto. Shoot it off next time you're at the range.
    Last edited by bmcgilvray; November 6th, 2011 at 11:35 PM.
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    Senior Member Array rljohns's Avatar
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    I also carry Winchester Ranger-T in 45 acp and re-chamber a large number of times with no set-back. If I was carring a .40 S&W I might be more concerned. The 45 is a low pressure large round. I must un-load and re-chamber everyday to store my frirearm at work. I have switched to my J-Frame on non-shooting days to reduce re-chambering in an auto.

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    Distinguished Member Array ArkhmAsylm's Avatar
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    I usually don't remove my chambered rounds until I get to the range or when I'm cleaning my firearms.
    oneshot likes this.
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    I ran a test with my .45 ACP reloads, Speer GD, and Win PDX1 ammo by rechambering a rounds of each 10 times in my Glock 30. The reload set back what I consider significantly (+.10"), which I expected as the brass had been fired multiple times; surprisingly, the Speer GD set back nearly as much as the reloaded round; but the PDX1 barely budged, moving only .001-.002". Perhaps Win uses stiffer brass or a tighter crimp; I don't have the answer to that.
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    Member Array Rightwing's Avatar
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    Good thread! I need to run some tests...
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    Once I chamber a round it stays chambered until it gets shot.
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    Best Choices for Self Defense Ammunition

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