Is the .357 Sig slowly dying? - Page 2

Is the .357 Sig slowly dying?

This is a discussion on Is the .357 Sig slowly dying? within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by onacoma Now the Hawk has diss my HK, but the reasoning is this, an LE can purchase a Glock for ± $300-$400 ...

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 97
Like Tree24Likes

Thread: Is the .357 Sig slowly dying?

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    The Valley of the Sun, AZ
    Posts
    1,018
    Quote Originally Posted by onacoma View Post
    Now the Hawk has diss my HK, but the reasoning is this, an LE can purchase a Glock for ± $300-$400 vs a HK weapon for LE "Large Volume Only" of ± $600-$700. Retail is upwards of $850.00 on an HK. HK was selling more 9mm and 40 S&Ws so manufacturing a limited run .357 Sig barrel is more costly.

    I reload .357 Sig for training or run my 40 S&W barrel. As for SD rounds I don't see Winchester or Speer limiting production. However I do hoard when I see a sale! Just for my retirement!
    I didn't diss your HK, I just said it's not popular among LE. That is all.
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

    “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress and grows brave by reflection.” ― Thomas Paine


  2. #17
    Ex Member Array Yankeejib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    1,003
    I don't see .357 sig going away any time soon. On the other hand, 9 and 40 cover the bases pretty well too, for far less $.

  3. #18
    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Hawk View Post
    I didn't diss your HK, I just said it's not popular among LE. That is all.
    You try working with ±300 LEOs and 298 carry those Tupperware guns, aka Glocks!

    You get just a little protective about the only friend I've had longer than ANY of my wifes!

    Note the other HK guy carries a .357 Sig baby Glock as a back up!

    Come to think of it, if I'd stay away from marriages, I could have afforded more HKs! C'est La Vie!


    In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm and three or more is a congress. -- John Adams

    If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it's free! -- P.J. O'Rourke

  4. #19
    VIP Member Array zonker1986's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    3,833
    don't think the .357 SIG is going away anytime soon.....but do see manufacturers without a large
    LEO contract to drop the caliber as they are just not selling enough of them to private citizens to keep them in their catalog. All I see are Glocks and SIGs with the .357 SIG contracts.

    In 1995, the Texas Highway Patrol became the first government agency to deploy a firearm utilizing .357 SIG cartridge.

    The SIG-Sauer P229 in .357 SIG has been adopted for use by agents and officers of the following organizations:

    United States Secret Service,[2]
    Bureau of Industry and Security,
    Federal Air Marshals,[2]
    Delaware State Police,[2]
    Rhode Island State Police,
    Virginia State Police,[2]
    Richmond City Police, Virginia,
    Bastrop County Sheriff's Office,
    Alameda County Sheriff's Office,
    Montana Highway Patrol
    North Carolina Highway Patrol
    The Tennessee Highway Patrol presently issues the Glock 31 pistol chambered in .357 SIG. The Mississippi Highway Patrol issues a (Glock 31 Generation 4) with their logo engraved on the weapon.[21][22] The Bedford Heights Police Department in Ohio currently issues the Glock 31/32/33. The Elloree Police Department in South Carolina Elloree Police also issues the Glock 31, .357 SIG and the Madison Police Department in Madison, WV issues the Glock 32 in .357 SIG. The Lexington Police Department in North Carolina issues the Sig P229 DAK in .357 Sig. The Oklahoma Highway Patrol issues the SIG-Sauer P226 in .357 SIG. The Paramus Police Department in New Jersey also issues the SIG P226 in .357 SIG. The West Grove Borough Police Department, West Grove PA, also carry the SIG-Sauer P226 in the .357 SIG caliber. The North Carolina State Highway Patrol uses Smith & Wesson M&P's chambered in .357 SIG. The Herculaneum (Missouri) Police Department uses the P226 and P229 in .357 SIG. The Orlando Police Department uses the Sig-Sauer P226 in .357 SIG.[23]
    sensei2 and Bad Bob like this.
    Kimbers are the guns you show your friends....Glocks are the ones you show your enemies.

  5. #20
    Distinguished Member Array CDW4ME's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by azchevy View Post
    Only due to ammo costs... it will stay around. Just be a niche caliber that only certain people can afford or want to afford like the 10mm.
    Quote Originally Posted by czman2006 View Post
    From what I've seen and heard about it the .357 Sig will become a niche round, as stated above. Next will be the .45 GAP, IMHO.
    I've done my small part for the niche calibers, Glock 33, 29 SF, 38.

    I guess I'm a sucker for slight caliber advantages.
    The 33 produces more KE with less kick than a G27 (40 S&W), no penalty in capacity.
    The 29 SF produces more KE than the 30 (45 acp) no penalty in capacity.
    The 38 is more pleasant to shoot than the 23, has a bigger bore, same frame size, less rounds.
    No internal lock or magazine disconnect on my pistols!

  6. #21
    Senior Member Array Sig35seven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,115
    The 357sig ammo can be purchased at a slightly more cost than .40 cal. It's no big deal. I use Georgia Arms factory reloads at the range. $16.50 for 50 rounds.

    Also, decompression at altitude can be serious depending on how fast the air escapes from the cabin. The golfer Payne Stewart and his mates were killed when there private jet apparently had a window fracture. This caused everyone in the cabin, including the pilots, to become incapacitated from ear drums exploding and other decompression related injuries. The plane flew until it ran out of gas and then crashed.
    "Confidence is food for the wise man but liquor for the fool"

  7. #22
    Senior Member Array czman2006's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    737
    Quote Originally Posted by czman2006 View Post
    From what I've seen and heard about it the .357 Sig will become a niche round, as stated above. Next will be the .45 GAP, IMHO.
    But let me say there is nothing wrong with a niche round. I'm even thinking about getting a .38 super!
    OldVet likes this.
    "Let not your heart be troubled." John 14:1

    USN Retired Vietnam/Desert Shield/Desert Storm

  8. #23
    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by Sig35seven View Post
    Also, decompression at altitude can be serious depending on how fast the air escapes from the cabin. The golfer Payne Stewart and his mates were killed when there private jet apparently had a window fracture. This caused everyone in the cabin, including the pilots, to become incapacitated from ear drums exploding and other decompression related injuries. The plane flew until it ran out of gas and then crashed.
    Sorry but that BS!

    There was no decompression or ear drums blowing out! The offical report stated "The NTSB determined that the probable cause of this accident was incapacitation of the flight crewmembers as a result of their failure to receive supplemental oxygen following a loss of cabin pressurization, for undetermined reasons."

    Here is the link!

    Payne Stewart Plane Crash Information


    In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm and three or more is a congress. -- John Adams

    If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it's free! -- P.J. O'Rourke

  9. #24
    Moderator
    Array gasmitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    11,308
    "Explosive decompression" - amazing how one scene from "Goldfinger" became a revered Hollywood staple for more than a generation!

    Most technical types in the airplane biz know the notion of explosive decompression is a myth, and the Aloha Airlines incident 20+ years ago was plenty of real-world confirmation. But - using Hollywood to debunk Hollywood, Myth Busters ran that experiment on a full-size aircraft. Using a scrapped commercial airline fuselage (DC-9?), they sealed it off and used an enormous compressor to pressurize it to the correct delta-P that represented flight conditions, then remotely fired a 9mm round through the airplane skin from the inside. The result? A little "hisssss" like a leaking tire. They plugged the hole and then tried shooting a window - same result. When they were all done, the only thing which could get their dummy even halfway out the fuselage was using C4 to blow a 3-foot hole in the plane. One of their better episodes.
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member
    NROI Chief Range Officer

  10. #25
    Senior Member Array SFury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    757
    I think comparing the .357 Sig to the .45 GAP is a big mistake. The .45 GAP does not appear to be even garnering much support at all compared to the .357 Sig anyways.

    I think the .357 Sig will eventually garner more market. It's a solid round with a good following, and more LEAs are either moving to it, or allowing it as an option for their officers. Which is a good sign at any rate.

  11. #26
    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    2,502
    Quote Originally Posted by SFury View Post
    I think comparing the .357 Sig to the .45 GAP is a big mistake. The .45 GAP does not appear to be even garnering much support at all compared to the .357 Sig anyways.

    I think the .357 Sig will eventually garner more market. It's a solid round with a good following, and more LEAs are either moving to it, or allowing it as an option for their officers. Which is a good sign at any rate.
    I agree with this guy. But just the same, I hoard ammo for mine.

  12. #27
    Senior Member Array Sig35seven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,115
    Quote Originally Posted by onacoma View Post
    Sorry but that BS!

    There was no decompression or ear drums blowing out! The offical report stated "The NTSB determined that the probable cause of this accident was incapacitation of the flight crewmembers as a result of their failure to receive supplemental oxygen following a loss of cabin pressurization, for undetermined reasons."

    Here is the link!

    Payne Stewart Plane Crash Information
    It is NOT BS. You need a better understanding of what can happen to smaller aircraft at high altitude.

    First the NTSB concluded... " No definitive evidence exists that indicates the rate at which the accident flight lost its cabin pressure; therefore, the Safety Board evaluated conditions of both rapid and gradual depressurization."

    "If there had been a breach in the fuselage (even a small one that could not be visually detected by the in-flight observers) or a seal failure, the cabin could have depressurized gradually, rapidly, or even explosively." (NTSB)

    Linda Pendelton is an expert in this arena. She is an expert on the subject of high-altitude physiology and decompression. You're guaranteed to learn a thing or three from Linda's remarkable article. She specifically speaks about decompression affects in smaller aircraft like Stewarts Lear jet. (Since they have a smaller volume decompression happens faster and they are affected more severely than large jets.)

    When Humans Fly High: What Pilots Should Know About High-Altitude Physiology, Hypoxia, and Rapid Decompression

    "The most noticeable immediate effect of rapid cabin decompression will be the sudden rush of air from the lungs. As noted above, this can be a near fatal experience in explosive decompressions in small aircraft."

    "The trapped gas disorder almost everyone who has ever flown is familiar with is one affecting the ears -- actually the middle ear. Usually, trapped gas in this area is a problem on descents, but discomfort and pain can be present during rapid decompressions."

    "Explosive or Rapid Decompression -- This seems to be the most likely scenario."

    No one will ever know for sure BUT it appears from an expert point of view that the pilots were immediately overwhelmed with pain and disorientation due to the explosive decompression. They would have been alerted to a slow decompression by the aircraft saftey system and could have avoided hypoxia had that been the case.
    "Confidence is food for the wise man but liquor for the fool"

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,496
    The 357 is going no where it will be around.
    It is a good hunting weapon I have taken a few deer with one. It is flexible shoots all 357 rounds and 38's, You can even buy some with an extra cyl and can shoot 9mm with it.
    While Auto seems to rule the day in movies Revolvers are still selling well. I have notice a swing to revolvers for CC creeping up. They are simple , and never fail.
    A 357 with the right rounds will drop a man better than most. Even the 38 Sp are selling good right now. You may not hear much about them but they are selling.
    I was not so long ago they were pronouncing the 9mm dead, the 40 was going to replace it. Glade I did not bet on that one. The 45 has been pronounced dead a few times still big seller.
    Sales are the only factor in how long a weapon sticks around.

  14. #29
    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    The Valley of the Sun, AZ
    Posts
    1,018
    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty901 View Post
    The 357 is going no where it will be around.
    It is a good hunting weapon I have taken a few deer with one. It is flexible shoots all 357 rounds and 38's, You can even buy some with an extra cyl and can shoot 9mm with it.
    While Auto seems to rule the day in movies Revolvers are still selling well. I have notice a swing to revolvers for CC creeping up. They are simple , and never fail.
    A 357 with the right rounds will drop a man better than most. Even the 38 Sp are selling good right now. You may not hear much about them but they are selling.
    I was not so long ago they were pronouncing the 9mm dead, the 40 was going to replace it. Glade I did not bet on that one. The 45 has been pronounced dead a few times still big seller.
    Sales are the only factor in how long a weapon sticks around.
    We're talking about .357 SIG, not .357 Magnum.
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

    “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress and grows brave by reflection.” ― Thomas Paine

  15. #30
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,496
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Hawk View Post
    We're talking about .357 SIG, not .357 Magnum.
    Sorry The 357 Sig IMO was never anything but a novelty gun I had forgot about it until you posted that.
    Novelty Guns will stick around as long as people with money buy them.

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

.357 sig
,
.357 sig ammo review
,

.357 sig review

,
.357 sig reviews
,

357 sig

,
357 sig ammo review
,
357 sig popularity
,

357 sig review

,
357 sig reviews
,
reloading 357 sig
,
sig 357
,
sig 357 review
Click on a term to search for related topics.