Best 158 Grain 357 load

This is a discussion on Best 158 Grain 357 load within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by bmcgilvray Good point, mir1m. That's one of the main reasons I am uninterested in stunted 5-shot .357 Magnum models from any manufacturer. ...

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Thread: Best 158 Grain 357 load

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array mlr1m's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Good point, mir1m.

    That's one of the main reasons I am uninterested in stunted 5-shot .357 Magnum models from any manufacturer. A .357 Magnum revolver ought to have the capability to roundly thrash all other comers of the .355/.357 bore diameter tribe in power delivered to the target and that just isn't practically achieved with comfort and long life with "undernourished," lightweight, shrunken .357 Magnum revolvers with snub barrels. The .357 Magnum cartridge shouldn't have ever been so limited. Tiny .357 Magnums are a stunt in my view.
    While I am partially in agreement with you I do believe that lighter weight 357 have a legitimate use. Many cops back then felt they needed the penetration that the 1500 fps 158 gr 357 offered. A lightweight platform that was easier to carry on a daily basis gave that to them. They knew that this weapon was more of an emergency use only weapon and not a daily shooter. After all why should they carry a huge N frame S&W that can handle the abuse of everyday shooting when they only needed to shoot it occasionally? They needed a weapon they could easily carry everyday not one that would hold up to thousands of heavy loads being fired through it. For those people who need a daily carry it makes perfect sense to go with the lighter weapon. They just need to realize that there are limits that go with the lighter weight.

    Its kind of like my little 44 Charter Arms that I have had for 35 years or more. I know this gun will not hold up to everyday use with the loads I keep in it. Because of that I seldom fire it except for some practice and to use up old ammo. It will however last many a lifetime as what it was intended for. A last resort break glass in case of danger sort of gun.

    Michael

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  3. #17
    Member Array Ivan's Avatar
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    BB has a Tactical Low Flash Lower Recoil .357 load that I carry in my 640. Since you want something for night use, this may be an option you want to look at. It is a bit easier on recoil than some .357 loads, but has plenty of power.

  4. #18
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    Another one for handloaded 158 gr with either 2400 or H110.

    My hunting loads with 2400 give about 1400 to 1425 fps out of the wifes 4" GP100. Similar velocities are achieved from a buddies S&W 629.

    I haven't chronoed them out of my 3" SP101, but they shoot just fine out of it. With the Hogue grip they are not unpleasant to shoot.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
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  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Good point, mir1m.

    That's one of the main reasons I am uninterested in stunted 5-shot .357 Magnum models from any manufacturer. A .357 Magnum revolver ought to have the capability to roundly thrash all other comers of the .355/.357 bore diameter tribe in power delivered to the target and that just isn't practically achieved with comfort and long life with "undernourished," lightweight, shrunken .357 Magnum revolvers with snub barrels. The .357 Magnum cartridge shouldn't have ever been so limited. Tiny .357 Magnums are a stunt in my view.
    I totally agree with this, none of my small frame revolvers are rated for .357 loads, bought them that way intentionally. I even carry my model 66 loaded with .38 +P instead of .357 magnums, although I carry has Buffalo Bore's 140 grain tactical low flash low recoil in the speed loader. Part of the reason I bought my Model 27 (other than the cool factor) was for something a little more stout in the .357 realm.
    "Don't start none, won't be none!"

  6. #20
    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
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    I have always found the 158gr Hydra Shok to be a very low penetrating load for a 158. It expands and then fragments surprisingly quick for a bullet with a small HP, I guess the little lead post works. If you had thoughts of using it on dangerous critters I'd pick something else. I have a ton of Remington SJHP that has always worked for me.
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  7. #21
    Member Array Alarm Guy's Avatar
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    Double tap has a 158 load with both a Nosler bullet and a Gold Dot. What is the purpose of a Nosler?

  8. #22
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    Hey a Nosler and a Gold Dot in the same load! Yeah, that's pretty hefty and ought to do some damage too.

    Only kidding.

    Seriously, that Nosler 158 grain bullet looks pretty conventional if it is like the 210 grain Nosler jacketed hollow point bullets I used in the .41 Magnum. Don't know what it's claim to fame is.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  9. #23
    Senior Member Array SFury's Avatar
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    Nosler rounds are partitioned rounds.

    They are typically rifle rounds with a polymer tip with a post in the middle of the fragments that are encased in lead. The tip has to have the proper amount of energy on impact to push back into the lead to cause the fragments to split out. Nosler rounds do not just expand. That is a common myth. For shots over 100 yards they almost always expand properly, but under can be an issue.

    I currently use a nosler round to hunt deer with. I used to hunt with a .44 mag rifle with hollow points. Hollow points are simple enough and work by expanding after impact leaving a large wound channel. Very effective rounds in their own right.

    Nosler rounds don't expand in the same manner, they fragment out if they hit with the proper amount of energy to force the polymer tip back. A common problem when hunting in close is that you can be too close where the bullet will pass through the animal without fragmenting if you don't hit enough mass to push the polymer tip back. I've experienced this on very close range follow up shots (only at this point). It's a physics thing and I don't get all the math behind it.

    However, when the round fragments properly, the damage caused is anything but minimal. I had a 2" exit hole on the 7 pt buck I shot at 120 yards this year with my 7mm08. They are an absolutely violent rounds that are extremely effective for killing. You just need to understand their limitations.

    Just remember that even the weakest of the centerfire rifle rounds typically have far more energy than the strongest of handgun rounds. I'm not certain how well a nosler round would work for handguns. I have not seen a test of the nosler handgun rounds, and until I do I would not use one. I would want to make certain they actually do what they claim they do.

  10. #24
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    The Nosler .41 Magnum component bullets I've bought are conventional jacketed hollow points with no mention of being a Partition on their labeling.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  11. #25
    Member Array Alarm Guy's Avatar
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    I may try some Winchester Silver Tips also? Thanks for all the good advice!!

  12. #26
    Member Array Exsimguy1's Avatar
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    Sfury,
    Not all Nosler bullets are partitioned, only their "Partition" line, which does not have a poly tip, it is exposed lead.
    (and it mushrooms normally)

    Terry
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  13. #27
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    mir1m,

    Good points and historically factual.

    My old (federal) agency dilly-dallied around with every conceivable .357 Magnum factory round imaginable. At one point, we were even being issued 110 grain rounds. FUN to shoot as they gave you a bang you could hear for miles and a muzzle flash you could see from outer space, but I had very little confidence in the round as a manstopper. That particular round was chosen for its lack of recoil--that made it favorable to the desk-jockeyes and undersized female academy candidates.

    I haven't bought nor acquired factory ammunition since leaving law enforcement over two decades ago, but I still have boxes and boxes of Federal 125 gr JHP in .357 Magnum and still regard it as a superb manstopper.

    But like my fellow Texan, I'm a fan of the 158 grain bullet. I cast a (lead) 158 gr that I hollow-point and sit on top of 14 grains of 2400 and ignite with a Winchester magnum primer. The powder doesn't really need a magnum primer, but after much load testing, I settled on that particular primer, powder and bullet configuration.

    I fear nothing with six of those rounds in the cylinder of my 686 as any time I carry a wheelgun, I carry at least one loaded speedloader as well.

    Likewise, the old FBI 158 SWCHP round in .38+P is very effective.

    I'm generally a fan of a heavier bullet. I want knockdown or stopping force more than penetration. In other words, I want a round fired from my gun to get the bad guy's physical attention in a hurry. Lightweight deep penetrators don't always do that, as evidenced by how many people have been shot with .22s and .25ACPs and stated they weren't aware for a few moments that they'd even been shot.

    I've never read an after-action or hospital interview where a bad guy was shot with a .357 Magnum or .45ACP and stated that he wasn't aware he'd been shot until later. . .

    JD
    bmcgilvray and 40Bob like this.
    Author of Above Reproach, the new thriller that unequivocally positions the Second Amendment and concealed carry as our nation's most effective system of homeland and personal security.

  14. #28
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    Hi JD;

    Welcome to the Forum.

    Saw your avatar so did a bit of poking around.

    Your book looks like a good read.

    J.D. KINMAN
    Above Reproach: J.D. Kinman: Amazon.com: Books
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  15. #29
    Member Array JDKinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Hi JD;

    Welcome to the Forum.

    Saw your avatar so did a bit of poking around.

    Your book looks like a good read.

    J.D. KINMAN
    Above Reproach: J.D. Kinman: Amazon.com: Books
    Thanks. I think it's a good read, but I've been accused of occasionally being biased. . .

    I'm also a big fan of the .357 Magnum--there are two instances of it being used in the book for self-defense, and it gets the job done in both cases.

    Still one of my favorite calibers, along with .44 Special.

    JD
    Author of Above Reproach, the new thriller that unequivocally positions the Second Amendment and concealed carry as our nation's most effective system of homeland and personal security.

  16. #30
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    A bit off topic but I really love the .44 Special too.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

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