Corrosive or not?

Corrosive or not?

This is a discussion on Corrosive or not? within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I recently bought some 7.62x54 Moisin Nagant ammo from one of my LGSs. Owner stated it was not corrosive, but now I'm beginning to have ...

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Thread: Corrosive or not?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array BamaT's Avatar
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    Corrosive or not?

    I recently bought some 7.62x54 Moisin Nagant ammo from one of my LGSs. Owner stated it was not corrosive, but now I'm beginning to have my doubts. Now, on one hand, it really doesn't bother me if it's corrosive, it's just a different cleaning regimen. The ammo in question is steel case, bronze colored, and the bullet has a silver tip, and was wrapped in paper, not in a box. I've bought some different ammo at another store in a box that clearly states it is non-corrosive. It's a gray steel case, no silver tip. Question is this: if the bronze colored rounds are really non-corrosive, will it hurt to first use a water based cleaning, dried, and then clean as you would with non-corrosive?


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    You're thinking correctly. Turn that Mosin Nagant rifle upside down on a stand that allows for horizontal cleaning and run some patches well-soaked in plain ol' water through it, taking care not to dribble water into the action. Then dry well and clean as you would normally. Presto, no residual corrosion.

    I sometimes boil a mug of water in the microwave, convincing myself that the really hot water helps. I doubt it really does. I have a quart can of WWII G.I. bore cleaner that I've been dipping into all my adult life. Good stuff if highly stinky for bores that have had corrosive ammunition fired through them. Looks like this quart can is going to see me out.

    You may still have morning dew and the occasoinal rain over there in Alabama. You could just toss a few of the fired cases out in the yard and observe them for a few weeks for signs of rapid rusting. An especially good test when some known non-corrosively primed cases are also tested as a control. I've left such cases in the back of the pickup for the same test. Trouble is, we've mostly sustained drought conditions here for the past couple of years. It's dry and humidity is low. It'd be a long wait to observe rust forming on steel cartridge cases.
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    There is still some corrosive ammo hanging around out there but, not as much as you might think. Corrosive primers will always be of the rounded type and not flat.
    Corrosive ammo production pretty much ceased by the '80s. If you think it might be corrosive ammo then swab your bore and barrel chamber out with WINDEX a.s.a.p. which works great to neutralize - follow that up with a dry patch and then a light coat of oil and then give all parts a good and proper going over to remove any residue.
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    I do some reenactment shooting with blanks loaded by our club armorer. Whatever the loads are, they produce a lot of smoke, and a residue of renowned proportions in the barrels. The gunk is horrible filthy and extremely difficult to remove. The trick is to use scalding hot soapy water followed by liberal bore cleaner and light oil. A gunsmith also recommended Simple Green, and he tried heated Simple Green which apparently worked real well too, followed with a good cleaning and oiling..........

    Having said that, I don't understand the chemistry well enough to offer an opinion, just more hearsay. Whatever it is, it is a pain.


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    Senior Member Array BamaT's Avatar
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    The primers were essentially flat. How pronounced is the rounding on the corrosive primers? The reason for my suspicion is first the paper wrapper, and secondly the silver tip. I recall reading on some ammo sites that a particular batch of surplus ammo maybe from say early 70's, has the silver tip. Perhaps that doesn't mean anything, but it made me question whether it was corrosive or not.
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    How pronounced is the rounding on the corrosive primers?

    Hummmm...that is hard to describe.

    OK...if you had a perfectly round 3/4" ball of clay and used a razor blade to take a little slice off...about that curved.
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    Senior Member Array BamaT's Avatar
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    Just looked at some light ball Russian surplus ammo from the 70's on SGAmmo, says all surplus military ammo is corrosive. They describe it as copper washed steel case, picture has a red sealer where the bullet is seated in the case and around the primer. Looks identical to what I purchased locally. I'm now convinced it is corrosive in spite of what LGS stated, and will follow corrosive cleaning regimen. Thanks to everyone for their input!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock and Glock View Post
    I do some reenactment shooting with blanks loaded by our club armorer. Whatever the loads are, they produce a lot of smoke, and a residue of renowned proportions in the barrels. The gunk is horrible filthy and extremely difficult to remove. The trick is to use scalding hot soapy water followed by liberal bore cleaner and light oil. A gunsmith also recommended Simple Green, and he tried heated Simple Green which apparently worked real well too, followed with a good cleaning and oiling..........
    So tell me please R&G was your reenactment shooting Civil War based or??

    Scalding hot water cleaning was pretty basic for the cat's meow super duper cleaning w/muzzleloaders. Before that I used this whiz bang pink wax cleaner that worked great on ball patches.
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    Member Array mrwonderful's Avatar
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    Lots of cleaning opinions out there. Here is a link that reflects most of what I saw on the forums: Hoppes #9 good enough for corrosive priming?
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