How big a deal is "dirty?"

This is a discussion on How big a deal is "dirty?" within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Up to this point I've had a buy-it-as-you-use-it approach to getting ammo. I keep a loaded gun and full extra magazine. Other than that, I ...

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Thread: How big a deal is "dirty?"

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    Member Array lyz_grace's Avatar
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    How big a deal is "dirty?"

    Up to this point I've had a buy-it-as-you-use-it approach to getting ammo. I keep a loaded gun and full extra magazine. Other than that, I get a box of practice ammo at the range and shoot it up before I leave. I would like to keep more of an inventory at home so that 1) we have more on hand and 2) I'm not paying full price on something I could have gotten on sale months before.

    SO... I'm entering the world of bulk ammo buying.

    My question is, how educated do I REALLY need to be when it comes to quality between manufacturers? It seems to me that, as long as I stay away from shady reloads, the only thing I have to worry about is whether it's steel or brass casing and how dirty it is. I clean my gun each time I shoot it - I just find it very cathartic. Is something that's mildly corrosive going to give me issues if I clean my gun within hours of shooting it? I can only afford range trips once or twice a month, as it stands.

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    Distinguished Member Array RevolvingMag's Avatar
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    I buy all my 'target ammo' from Georgia-Arms. Bag of .38spl ~$11.50, bag of .45ACP ~$18.50, bag of .357mag ~$18-20 depending on the load. Those are bags of 50.

    They do 'canned heat' 500-1000 rounds of your choice ranging from $120-500 depending on your particular wants/needs.

    Only ever had one issue with their stuff (out of thousands) and it was a light load that didn't have enough kick to eject the spent casing. Other than that, it's been flawless stuff.

    Their stuff also tends to not be so dirty- that I've found. As long as you clean it well and soon, you shouldn't have any problems. Just don't let it set for a week or two.
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    Member Array lyodbraun's Avatar
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    Go to your local walmart and start buying the Federal value packs 100 count, here at my local walmart they sell for 9mm 19.97, .40S&w 27.97, and .45ACP is 29.97, Ive been shooting it with no problems at all ,and its by far one of the cheapest places to buy from... if they have it in stock...

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    I think you're fine shooting cheap, as long as you're not using someone else's reloads. The only exception is that I also trust GA arms reloads. I'm hoping to score some at a gun show this weekend.

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    I have used Georgia Arms also and have not had a problem with them. I also have had good luck with buying in Bulk from Ammo to go
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    Senior Member Array IAm_Not_Lost's Avatar
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    I can't speak to GA's reloads, but I just get whatever is cheapest. If that means it's Tula ammo at Walmart, or some S&B at my LGS I don't really care anymore. To be honest I generally can't find bulk ammo online (including shipping) that is ever much or any cheaper than Walmart (as sad as that is). I clean all my guns for the most part after shooting, unless I know I'll be going out the next day too.
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    It's doubtful that you're going to run across "corrosive" ammo unless you buy a batch of old, old military or foreign produced rounds. Ads in some of these suplus ammo sales usually have a "corrosive ammmo" disclaimer.

    As for cleaning within hours of shooting non-corrosive ammo, there's no rush. It's just a little harder to clean out the gunk after it's sat for a few months.

    I don't buy the Russian ammo on principle. After 20 years of standing nose-to-nose with them, I'm not going to support its economy now.
    smolck and 1MoreGoodGuy like this.
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    VIP Member Array varob's Avatar
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    I've had good luck with SGAmmo and Ammo To Go as well.

    I usually get the better deals when I buy 1000+ rounds or more.
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    Member Array Motodeficient's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lyodbraun View Post
    Go to your local walmart and start buying the Federal value packs 100 count, here at my local walmart they sell for 9mm 19.97, .40S&w 27.97, and .45ACP is 29.97, Ive been shooting it with no problems at all ,and its by far one of the cheapest places to buy from... if they have it in stock...
    Agreed, I think this is the best deal in ammunition right now. If they have the Federal in stock, I buy it. If not, I buy the Tula. It all works in my guns. I don't care if ammo is dirty or not. My XD9 and XDs clean up in just a few minutes. I'm going to clean them anyway, so it makes no difference.

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    Member Array lyz_grace's Avatar
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    Thanks, guys!! Glad I don't have to worry about white glove ammo inspections

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    Member Array GetSmith's Avatar
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    If you have the cash it's great to stock up in bulk. Someday when you need it most ammo might not be available. My vote is for SGAMMO. Great service. I bought about 20,000 rounds from them. 13,000 Federal American Eagle FMJ in 9mm and .40 cal. Most of the stock for this great deal they had is gone but they still have 124 grain 9mm. Case of 1000 for about $230 with shipping. $11.50 for a box of 50 to my door, cheaper than my local wallmart. Get it while you can.
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    Senior Member Array Gaius's Avatar
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    Got 1000 rounds of Aguila 124 gr 9mm at SGammo for $197.80 and $16 shipping.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    The corrosive nature of the chemical residues from ammo has been known for a long time. From what I understand, most ammo makers have taken steps to alleviate most (if not all) of the issues.

    The way I think of it is that powder blast gets on hands, grips, stocks, as well as inside the gun. And anything I've touched has gotten body oils and other crud onto/into the gun. If I'm going to be shooting again within a couple days, there have been occasions when I've skipped the after-range cleaning regimen. But if the gun's likely to be more than a couple days with the residue, I clean and lube it. If it has gotten wet or seen moisture due to hot/cold condensation, then I clean/lube it. In the safe, I've taken pains to have good humidity control, and taken pains to never put away guns that have seen wet/condensation.

    How worried does one need to be? Beyond those basic steps, I wouldn't worry too much. Can you leave a gun for weeks following shooting, to leave the residues/oils to do their work over that time? Sure, and probably without any damage. But personally I'd avoid doing that as standard practice, since it's likely that over a long period of time you'll begin to have deterioration of the finish, stocks, grips. If ever selling a gun, it's worth considering the impact on resale value if a gun has had such a regimen, as opposed to be rigorously cleaned/lubed throughout its life.
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    American commercial ammunition companies began providing non-corrosive ammunition in 1927. Remington Kleanbore was the very first and the word "Kleanbore" was prominently featured on the ammunition boxes. Winchester was hot on Remington's heals with "Staynless" priming. Some German firms had some non-corrosive priming compounds on the market a few years before we did. World War II commercial ammunition shortages did a pretty big number on stocks of pre-war ammunition and much old corrosively primed ammunition was used up during the war years and just after.

    U.S. military contract ammunition used lots of corrosive priming during the World War II. They valued the corrosive primers of the era for their consistency, stability, and long shelf life. Supposedly, only the .30 Carbine cartridge was the only one which never was produced for the military on contract using corrosive priming. The only .30-06 military contract ammunition that used non-corrosive priming was Verdun Arsenal of Canada which made it for American consumption. It's marked VC. Some small lots of .30-06 military contract match ammunition continued to use corrosive priming until the mid-1950s along with a single run of 7.62 NATO Match ammunition produced in 1956.

    Foreign military ammunition is different. Much of it must be considered suspect.

    Bore condition is a bit bigger deal when considering pre-war firearms for so many were used with ammunition using corrosive primers. Frosted, deeply pitted bores are quite common on such guns that otherwise are in fine condition. The .22 rim fire cartridges of the early years of the 20th century were particularly bad. Some said that the relative powder charge was so small that the priming compounds were deposited in a less diluted state. Some rim fire priming mixtures used ground glass as a component and this blasted the steel in the bores. It was a near physical impossibility to clean the corrosive effects away from one's .22 rim fire gun. It was said that a product sold by Winchester and called Winchester Crystal Cleaner was about all that would stave off corrosion in bores. Many who weren't gun savvy didn't concern themselves with strenuous cleaning processes so many old .22 rim fire firearms survivors feature ruined bores.
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    VIP Member Array smolck's Avatar
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    The few times I bought in bulk, I ran through it faster. My subconscious kept saying "why not go to the range, you have a lot of ammo ya know?"

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