explain me 30x ammo

This is a discussion on explain me 30x ammo within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am looking a few bolt action rifles such as Marlin, Savage, Remington , etc. Was hoping to have good medium range, (250-500 yds) with ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
Like Tree3Likes

Thread: explain me 30x ammo

  1. #1
    Member Array boatman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    NE
    Posts
    171

    explain me 30x ammo

    I am looking a few bolt action rifles such as Marlin, Savage, Remington , etc. Was hoping to have good medium range, (250-500 yds) with something that has more punch than 5.56.

    I have looked at the 30-06, 308, 7.62, which all seem pretty close.

    What would be the most common and least expensive size if I walked into any LGS across the country. In other words, what would I always find on the shelf, and approximate price. A 5.56 is about 40 cents per, what is going to be the best 'bang for the buck' (sorry;-) Thanks.

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    15,177
    308,in a pinch milsurp 7.62x51 is the same case diameter.I haven't bought any lately,but 10 years ago I bought 1320 rounds of milsurp 7.62x51 for $100.00 + S&H about $120.00.
    Ever since the wars there doesn't seem to be too much milsurp floating around and definitely not that cheap,you can find it under .50 round but it's probably gonna be steel cased ammo,only way to get costs down is reload,but even with equipment buying bulk bullets and bulk powder and primers to get cheaper prices,and having brass on hand It's still gonna cost me about .35 cents a round to reload.
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

  4. #3
    Member Array msc8127's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Springdale, Arkansas
    Posts
    286
    I second the .308 recommendation. I personally like the 30-06 better, but for what you're looking for a .308 should be about perfect.

    sent via iCarry

  5. #4
    VIP Member Array jbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Dandridge Tennessee
    Posts
    2,060
    Ditto on the .308

  6. #5
    Moderator
    Array gasmitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    10,176
    Availability of .308 vs .30-06 hunting ammo is effectively equal, at least in the Lower 48. There's a wider range of .30-06 available, from 125 to 200 grain, but the price of good hunting ammo is pretty similar for both, around $1 a shot. For range ammo, the .308 has a slight advantage.
    msgt/ret and kmagnuss like this.
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member

  7. #6
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    15,954
    In 1975, I choose a Remington 700 in .30-06 over the .308 for the slight advantages the -06 held: a bit more velocity, usually not more than 100-150 FPS for a given bullet wt., and because of the longer case and neck--the -06 would load a longer, heavier bullet (up to 220 grn where the .308 was limited to about 180 grns). I had intention of hunting out west and in Alaska where ranges and heavier bullets may be called for.

    In all reality, I never needed anything heavier than 180 grains for moose, never shot more than 350 yards, a range the .308 is perfectly capable of. My prefered bullet for long range, accuracy, and power was the Sierra 165-grn, spire-point boattail, which would have suited the .308 just fine for nearly any hunting scenerio in the lower 48 states.

    The advantages the .308 would have had were a shorter action and availability of 7.62 NATO brass for reloading. With both being familiar military rounds, I think the .308 is gradually pushing the .30-06 aside in popularity, but both will have a large share of the hunting market for a long time to come.

    As for price comparibility? Well, these days ammo is what it is, and the only real source of inexpensive(?) ammo is reloading.
    Retired USAF E-8. Remember: You're being watched!
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  8. #7
    Member Array boatman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    NE
    Posts
    171
    Thanks for the input all. So you can put 7.62 x 51 in a rifle set for .308? Is this also true with AK rounds (I think they are shorter at 39mm)?

  9. #8
    Member Array Fisher10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Western WA/Rexburg, ID
    Posts
    310
    The 30-06 is a little more versatile if you're a reloader. Some reasons are it has a longer case neck and a larger case capacity. Both cartridges are about equally effective in the field. Hunting ammo is going to cost about the same for both. Bolt action rifles for this cartridge use a long action.

    The .308 is very popular and it's popularity is only increasing because of the military usage of it's NATO counterpart the 7.62 NATO. If you have a .308 chamber, you can shoot 7.62 perfectly fine. If you have a 7.62 chamber, you should avoid commercial .308 because it can be loaded to slightly higher maximum pressures (62k vs 60.2k). .308 can be cheaper because of mil-surp ammo and recycled military components (fired cases primarily). There is still mil-surp 30-06 ammo and cases floating around, but they're drying up. Overall, .308 will be cheaper for factory new plinking ammo. Bolt action rifles for this cartridge generally use a short action.

    If you don't think you would use the advantages of heavier bullets (200-220gr) or need the 100-150fps faster muzzle velocity, get a .308. For my first hunting rifle I planned on finding a nice used .308, but instead I saw a used 30-06 that I couldn't pass up.

  10. #9
    Member Array Fisher10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Western WA/Rexburg, ID
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by boatman View Post
    Thanks for the input all. So you can put 7.62 x 51 in a rifle set for .308? Is this also true with AK rounds (I think they are shorter at 39mm)?
    If you are referring to reloading dies, yes. The exterior dimensions of 7.62x51 and .308 Winchester are identical. As long as you aren't pushing maximum loads, you can interchange them when reloading as well (this wouldn't do you favors for accuracy though). 7.62 NATO case walls are slightly thicker in some areas so it has slightly lower powder capacity and therefor a slightly lower ceiling for maximum pressure.

    7.62x39 is a VERY different round. For one, it's bullet diameter is .310" verses .308". The case is much shorter and has a significant taper to it.
    Read: 7.6251mm NATO - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Read: 7.6239mm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  11. #10
    Member Array boatman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    NE
    Posts
    171
    ok. next question that sort of hijacks my own thread...

    So it makes sense to go .308 to me. Any input on Marlin/savage/remington on cartridge loaded .308 for cost/accuracy? Hoping not to stir up a hornets nest here.

    PS. Oldvet, very cool pic of your dad. Plus like Buff Springfield ref.

  12. #11
    Member Array Fisher10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Western WA/Rexburg, ID
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by boatman View Post
    Any input on Marlin/savage/remington on cartridge loaded .308 for cost/accuracy?
    For an affordable production rifle, a Savage (w/ accu-trigger and accu-stock) has a very good reputation for accuracy. A Remington 700 is also a good choice.
    Your optic can be a significant contributor to your group size. Don't expect tiny groups if you're using a cheap scope and rings.
    For ammo, every rifle can shoot differently. This is where hand loads can be tuned for your specific rifle. Federal and other manufacturers load premium rounds using Sierra Matchkings or similar premium match bullets, which are your best option for benchmarking accuracy. They aren't cheap though.

  13. #12
    VIP Member
    Array oneshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    +42.893612,-082.710236 , Mi.
    Posts
    7,935
    Savage will do nicely, and if you are NOT wedded to the idea of a bolt action, Winchester had a very good semi-auto, the model 100, of which they chambered a lot of different calibers, including .308

    Remington had the 742 as well.

    Winchester model 100 semiautomatic rifle in .308 : Semi Auto Rifles at GunBroker.com

    Pre-64
    Winchester Model 100 308 Pre-64 : Semi Auto Rifles at GunBroker.com
    If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans.

    Washington didn't use his freedom of speech to defeat the British, He shot them!

    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." -- Ernest Benn

  14. #13
    Member Array Mark_in_wi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    130
    Define affordable. :) There are a lot of new models in the $500 ish range that should be decent. As for ammo what do you plan to use it for? The basic cup/core bullets (Rem express,Win power point, Fed champion) will be good for deer or smaller. The bonded should hold the bullet together better for better performance. These start with the Fed fusion and win power max. From here you get into the "premium" bullets where you might want to see how each is designed to preform. Price generally starts with the cup/core and moves up from there. I have had good accuracy from the Win Power Max from a couple rifles in different calibers. You will want to try a few different loads to see which you rifle will like.

  15. #14
    Member Array Mark_in_wi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by oneshot View Post
    Savage will do nicely, and if you are NOT wedded to the idea of a bolt action, Winchester had a very good semi-auto, the model 100, of which they chambered a lot of different calibers, including .308

    Remington had the 742 as well.

    Winchester model 100 semiautomatic rifle in .308 : Semi Auto Rifles at GunBroker.com

    Pre-64
    Winchester Model 100 308 Pre-64 : Semi Auto Rifles at GunBroker.com
    One quick note. The 742 is no longer made and is getting hard to find some parts. Nice gun though. Remington make the 750 in auto and the 7600 in a pump if that's what you are looking for. I believe there are a few other autos being made but not sure of price and availablity.

  16. #15
    Member Array FLArmadillo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Osceola County, FL
    Posts
    264
    Don't rule out Weatherby either, they seem to be really high quality rifles.
    As we used to teach in the spook business, carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it you may shoot it. If you shoot it you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody - and he finds out about it - he may be very angry with you. -- Jeff Cooper

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

1975 remington 700 30-06

,

1975 remington 700 30-06 value

,

30-06 siezed up

,

ballistics of bolt action ammo

,

best bolt action plinking round

,

best overall 30-06 round for medium range shooting

,

bolt action seizes after shot

,

bolt actions siezing up

,

does 250 savage ammo equal 30-06

,

explain how one forum of ammunition more effective than another forum of ammunition

,

rem 7600 federal fusion 308 ammo

,

remington 740 and 742 balistics

,

walking dad 30x

,

what ammo to shoot out of remington 700 long action 30-06 forum

,

which remington 700 is best for long plinking

Click on a term to search for related topics.