Rounds for predator defense?

This is a discussion on Rounds for predator defense? within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by OldVet An attack doesn't mean they all attack. You know, the anti-hunters say that about black bears around here too. It doesn't ...

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Thread: Rounds for predator defense?

  1. #31
    Senior Member Array SFury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    An attack doesn't mean they all attack.
    You know, the anti-hunters say that about black bears around here too. It doesn't make them any less wrong about bears than wolves. As the wolf population incresaes, and comes further into human contact, the more attacks there will be.

    It's a proven truth with every other predator in the US.

    We deal with nuisance bears every year throughout the state of Wisconsin, and every time one gets killed (meaning it is a repeat threat to people) the crying begins. Loudly, and stupidly.

    We may not kill nuisance bears every year, but we remove several of them from cities every year. They then get tagged prior to be released to more easily identify them in the future.

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  3. #32
    Distinguished Member Array lchamp's Avatar
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    When I used to fly above the Arctic Circle, we used to carry .357 magnum armor-piercing ammo in our revolvers. It was survival ammo and we were told our normal .38 ammo would bounce off the skull of the Polar Bears. I don't know how true that was, but I kept a box of that ammo for many years. I was afraid to shoot it with my personal revolver because I was worried about damaging the bore.

    I was lucky and never had to bail out up there above the circle.

  4. #33
    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Common? I'll bite on that. Documentation please? Never happened while I was in AK, not even remotely close. Wolves are extremely wary of humans, with good cause. The vast majority of reported wolf "attacks" are from captive wolves, not in the wild.
    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Hunting wolves out of the lower 48 had more to do with cattle protection than human protection. Attacks by wildlife are rare; attacks by wild wolves are extremely rare at best. Rabid skinks and raccoons are a much bigger threat than wolves that avoid people. An attack doesn't mean they all attack.
    The original Quote was that there had never been an attack on a human other than Red Riding hood. I never said they all attack that's a change from the original question. I have a great aunt who lived in AK from 1920 till about 1950, Her version of wolfs differs from yours. In her version a wolf will eat you if... Its hungry, and you are alone. I live in cougar country, just like wolfs they usually stay away from people. but they on occasion attack. I know they are around here because I see there tracks when I'm feeding horses in the morning and evening. So when I go out at night I carry a gun and a light... Just in case. DR
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  5. #34
    VIP Member Array Kilowatt3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghost tracker View Post
    ...There has never been a documented wolf attack on a human beyond Little Red Riding Hood...
    Uh, beg to differ. There have been several thousand fatal wolf attacks on humans. Granted, very few in North America - Most have been in Russia, India, or elsewhere in Eastern Europe, Asia, or the middle East. Here in the U.S., you are more likely to be killed by a rabid skunk, a dog, a spider, or a honeybee than a wolf, but to say they never attack (or kill) humans is B.S.

    Why wolves in North America tend to be a lot less aggressive towards humans is a good question. Alligators in Louisiana are a lot less aggressive than those in Florida, even though we have more of them, and they're bigger. Another one of life's little mysteries.

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  6. #35
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    I need you folks to educate me a little bit on Glocks and lead bullets. I have seen several threads touching on the fact that Glocks don't like caast lead bullets. They didn't really say why. Could sombody tell me why, and if that is the same thing as hardcast. I have a Glock 31, 357 Sig, and I would like to try the Double Tap 180 grain hard casts. Would that be an unwise choice for a Glock?

  7. #36
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    There have been "some" incidents of Glocks (and other makes) exploding, some due to bad reloads, some unexplained, primarily in the .40 cal. Glock--as do most gun makers--reccommends not shooting lead and or reloads (CYA). Glock utilizes a slightly larger chamber, which aids in its feeding reliability.

    I reload for my Glock 30, using lead round nose bullets. While I would have prefered SWCs, I couldn't get them to feed reliably so I changed to LRNs with no problem. I have found no evidence of leading in my Gock that exceeds any found in any of my other handguns.

    I've never tried lead in the .357 SIG, so I don't know how it works out at its velocities.
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  8. #37
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    I'm more worried about the two-legged predators than the four-legged ones. :)

  9. #38
    New Member Array Dutch's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies.

  10. #39
    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
    I need you folks to educate me a little bit on Glocks and lead bullets. I have seen several threads touching on the fact that Glocks don't like caast lead bullets. They didn't really say why. Could sombody tell me why, and if that is the same thing as hardcast. I have a Glock 31, 357 Sig, and I would like to try the Double Tap 180 grain hard casts. Would that be an unwise choice for a Glock?
    Glock uses a Polygon rifling, and that is thought to not work well with lead bullets. My own thought is that with properly sized bullets leading wont be an issue. But Glocks stand is "Don't use reloads and don't use lead bullets in our guns."
    I do reload lead bullets for my sons Glock. They are sized .454 and cast from hard cast lead. So far he has had good results with no leading in the bore. DR

  11. #40
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    Just ask this guy how to rid off a moose.

    Man vs Moose

  12. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghost tracker View Post
    What? "...so he uses that."?!? Okayyyy, then my friend's S&W revolver won't spin anything but full, square-shouldered, wad cutters, so he uses that.

    To the OP, just carry a well-respected 165 grain SD load for cougars. GLOCK reliability & mag capacity are on your side. There has never been a documented wolf attack on a human beyond Little Red Riding Hood. Moose are big but aren't looking for trouble. And unless you slick your hair with honey, uh, well, you get the picture.


    ^^^^^^^^Not true^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^



    GATLINBURG, Tenn. — The fatal mauling of a woman by a black bear appears to have been unprovoked, but the incident won’t change the park’s bear management policy, officials at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park say.

    “We know black bears have preyed on other species in the park, like white-tailed deer,” DeLozier said. “Given our black bear density and number of visitors, there’s always been the potential for this. Maybe that’s something people have underestimated in the past.”

    DeLozier said 37 fatal black bear attacks have been recorded in the United States. He said Sunday’s fatality was only the second fatal black bear attack in a national park. The other occurred in Yellowstone.

    From: Black bear mauls tourist

    This site Fatal Bear Attack Statistics
    has a mix of brown grizzley and black bear attacks and deaths, but blacksr are killers as well.


    Wolf attacks?
    You bet! WOLF ATTACKS ON HUMANS
    The .40 cal is at a dissadvantage for the species you listed.
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