Grain of ammo

This is a discussion on Grain of ammo within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hi guys. New here and to guns. How does grain affect a bullet? I've seen 9mm in 115,124,147 etc. thanks in advance....

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    Member Array IndianaMike's Avatar
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    Grain of ammo

    Hi guys. New here and to guns. How does grain affect a bullet? I've seen 9mm in 115,124,147 etc. thanks in advance.

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    VIP Member Array Cuda66's Avatar
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    Grain is a measure of weight.

    Therefore, in your 9mm example, a 147gr bullet would be heavier and (assuming the same construction--jacketed lead, for example) longer than the 115 gr and the 124gr bullets.

    There can be differences in accuracy and, when it comes to defensive ammo, terminal performance.
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    There is a reason they try and make small bullets act like big bullets--Glockmann10mm

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    Generally, the heavier the bullet, the slower it will go. The lighter the bullet, the faster it will be.
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    Heavier bullets can have more momentum when plowing through your target. Heavier bullets can also cause you to have a higher point of impact from a handgun but that isn't much of an issue with handgun distances.

    Most 'cheap' factory ammo you'll find on shelves is 115gr, because lead is kind of expensive. The bullet is the most expensive component in ammunition. I reload almost exclusively with 124 and 147gr bullets. I prefer the recoil impulse and I believe heavier bullets give me better accuracy in my handguns.

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    1 grain = 0.00228571429 ounces
    115 gr = 0.260 oz
    124 gr - 0.280 oz
    147 gr = 0.336 oz
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    Are you ever opening a can of worms! I suggest you do a forum search on bullet weights and I expect you will find lots of past threads about this subject.

    In general; lighter bullets go faster but have less penetration, heavier bullets go slower but have more penetration.
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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fisher10 View Post
    ... The bullet is the most expensive component in ammunition. ...
    I disagree. Unless you are using reclaimed brass, the brass cartridge is, by far, the most expensive component.

    Of course, most of us that reload, retrieve our brass so we hardly ever have to buy more.
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndianaMike View Post
    Hi guys. New here and to guns. How does grain affect a bullet? I've seen 9mm in 115,124,147 etc. thanks in advance.
    We need to know more about what you're asking. 'grain' is a weight measurement. After that, the question you're asking needs to be clarified. Right now, it's a bit like asking "how does pounds affect a football player?"
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    Senior Member Array Tzadik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PEF View Post
    1 grain = 0.00228571429 ounces
    115 gr = 0.260 oz
    124 gr - 0.280 oz
    147 gr = 0.336 oz
    Troy or Avoirdupois ?

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    Member Array IndianaMike's Avatar
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    I guess my question would be, does a higher grain have more stopping power, or is it better used for self defense.

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    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndianaMike View Post
    I guess my question would be, does a higher grain have more stopping power, or is it better used for self defense.
    Some will argue to use the largest bullet possible or will go with speed and a lighter bullet. I go with what I can shoot the best!

    Stopping power depend on where you place your shot! If you shoot the BG in the leg or arm with a 147 gr will it stop a BG faster than a 115 gr to the head?

    I personally carry a 125 gr during the spring, summer, and fall. When we take a winter trip to a cold area I go up to my 147 gr. But I'm EDC a 357 Sig.

    Here is the formula for calculating the energy of a bullet.

    Energy (ft. Lbs.) = (BW x V2)/Constant

    BW = Bullet weight in grains
    V = Muzzle Velocity
    Constant = 450400

    Here are links to Speer and Winchester Ranger T-Series which have the data point of their ammunition.

    Speer Ammo - Ballistics Tables

    http://winchesterle.com/Products/han...s/default.aspx


    I personally go with the ammunition I can put on the stop button with timely follow up shots! There is no such thing as a one shot stop!
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    VIP Member Array Cuda66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndianaMike View Post
    I guess my question would be, does a higher grain have more stopping power, or is it better used for self defense.
    Too many variables, such as bullet design, velocity, etc. to give a meaningful answer.

    I do, however, suggest you unlearn the term "stopping power"--it's a null phrase. I'll add that energy figures have very, very VERY little bearing at how effective a bullet will be, terminally speaking.

    I also suggest that you read this: Best Choices for Self Defense Ammo

    It'll probably answer most of the questions you have.
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    There are no dangerous weapons; there are only dangerous men.--RAH

    ...man fights with his mind; the weapons are incidental.--Jeff Cooper


    There is a reason they try and make small bullets act like big bullets--Glockmann10mm

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    For personal defensive purposes I go with the heaviest bullet (most mass).

    I am not a ballistics expert by any stretch of the imagination, but it seems to me the more mass the more stopping power. I also worry about over penetration Therefore the more mass, moving at a slower velocity, seems more likely to encounter more resistence thus is lees apt to over penetrate.

    However as many have pointed out the real key is whether the ammo you are using in your defensive handgun(s) works flawlessly time, after time after time.
    "Life is tough but it's really tough if you are stupid"

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    VIP Member Array Cuda66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hodad View Post
    For personal defensive purposes I go with the heaviest bullet (most mass).

    I am not a ballistics expert by any stretch of the imagination, but it seems to me the more mass the more stopping power. I also worry about over penetration Therefore the more mass, moving at a slower velocity, seems more likely to encounter more resistence thus is lees apt to over penetrate.

    However as many have pointed out the real key is whether the ammo you are using in your defensive handgun(s) works flawlessly time, after time after time.
    Actually, all things being equal, (same bullet type--ie, 115gr Gold Dot vs 147gr Gold Dot), the heavier bullet will penetrate more than the lighter one. More mass=more momentum, harder to stop.
    There are no dangerous weapons; there are only dangerous men.--RAH

    ...man fights with his mind; the weapons are incidental.--Jeff Cooper


    There is a reason they try and make small bullets act like big bullets--Glockmann10mm

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    Quote Originally Posted by high pockets View Post
    I disagree. Unless you are using reclaimed brass, the brass cartridge is, by far, the most expensive component.

    Of course, most of us that reload, retrieve our brass so we hardly ever have to buy more.
    I was referring to reloading ammunition, specifically 9mm. Once fired brass can be purchased for 2-4 cents a piece. The going rate for bullets is around 10 cents each it seems like. I still have a pretty good stash of 147gr Xtreme plated bullets at 7 cents each.

    I can't make myself buy factory new brass... Too expensive!

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