Reloading for Dummies (Newbs)?

Reloading for Dummies (Newbs)?

This is a discussion on Reloading for Dummies (Newbs)? within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Are there any good resources out there that will tell a beginner everything they need to get started with reloading? I'm looking at starting to ...

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    Senior Member Array tubadude's Avatar
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    Reloading for Dummies (Newbs)?

    Are there any good resources out there that will tell a beginner everything they need to get started with reloading? I'm looking at starting to reload for my M1 Garand, but I really have no idea where to start or even what to do with most of the stuff that comes in the RCBS kits, and I'd prefer to go into this knowing all that I can.


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    Member Array saigaguy's Avatar
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    Titan Reloading has good deals on press kits and die sets. I also bought a Hornady digital scale (amazon - any scale that measures in grains), and a digital caliper from Harbor Freight. Then just grab some reloading blocks to hold your bullets. Titan Reloading is very easy to get in contact with via phone.

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    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    Where Im at in Tn, I had a couple of good stores that I could go to in person to get set up. One was a darn good reloading store. Pretty much all they sold were reloading supplies.

    I had reloaded shotshell since I was a boy, but didnt have a clue about reloading for rifle or pistol. I KNEW that I would pay more buying from a store, (instead of online), but thought it worth it to get their advice.

    In both stores (in two different towns), they were happy to answer questions, and point me in the right direction as re resources, and products. If you can, visiting a store in person might be a good idea to get started.

    Btw, you can never have too many different reloading manuals. They are your friend. ESPECIALLY when powder is very hard to find. With enough data on loads, you can oft times find odd ball powders that are in stock, but less popular than the powders that are virtually impossible to find during a post sandy hook/obama shortage.

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    Get your self a reloading manual. Read it.

    Lots of people will tell you that. I waited until I got everything (RCBS rockchucker supreme kit, and a few other things), and read the manual before I set it up and got started. Should have bought+read a manual while I was still saving the last few weeks for the kit. You'll get such a better understanding of it all, the process, how and why you do all the steps + different things. Its all in the reloading manuals.

    Get yourself a manual, any of the good ones from the major companies, and read it.









    P.s. - Just get a reloading manual, and read it
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    Senior Member Array tubadude's Avatar
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    So the manuals have everything? I was under the impression that they just had info on different loads.

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    A good reloading manual has plenty of information on "How to..." I started out with a Speer #9 and it taught me 99% of what I needed to know. While it's load data is somewhat outdated, it still provides good info now and then. The limitations of some manuals is that Speer gives reloading data on Speer bullets, Sierra gives info on Sierra bullets, Hodgdons give reloading data with Hodgdons powders, etc. It may takes several sources of data to get the load you desire. I started without with minimal equipment and managed to make all the loads I needed. My gear is still minimal by many reloaders' standards, but it still gets the job done.

    There are many Garand shooters on this site who can steer you in that particular direction.
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    Member Array drbald1's Avatar
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    I just reloaded my very first rounds. Miller_man's right.... the manuals help. From a complete noob perspective it's a lot of calibrating and re-checking to make sure you haven't done something stupid or out-of-spec.

    Now I'd wait until after Wednesday to listen to any of my advice. That's when I'll know if the rounds work.
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    Lots of great books and manuals out there. I would recommend you load some 9MM or 45ACP ( straight wall casing) first then move up to the neck down style rifle casings. Learn on a single stage press and take your time. Make sure to get several manuals, Sierra, Hornaday, Lyman .......
    sadly there is a fair amount of wrong information on the internet so question everything.
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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    I just did a quick search on the internet. There are lots of "basic" reloading manuals listed. Most reloading manuals review the entire reloading process at the beginning of each book, but there ARE some books out there just for the beginning reloader. The only books that usually don't have any basic information are the ones from the individual powder manufacturers, they usually only list loads for their specific powder with very little set-up information.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tubadude View Post
    So the manuals have everything? I was under the impression that they just had info on different loads.
    Yep, my speer reloading manual that came with the kit - started with - the history of the bullet - LITERALLY.
    I read and learned a TON of history on bullets. It was one of the coolest things I've learned in a long time, and answered SO MANY things I had wondered and hadn't even thought of actually seeking to answer.

    And I'm still a newb myself (6 months in).

    Also, I picked up another manual a few weeks into reloading, mostly for more load data - but was impressed when I read the whole thing and it had little bits of different info and ways of explaining things in a different way that were of value to a new reloader like myself.
    The stupidity of some people NEVER ceases to amaze me.

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    VIP Member Array frankmako's Avatar
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    all good points so far. now what you need to do is to find someone close to you that will show you how to reload. someone to show you what to buy and what not to buy. someone to show you how to reload and the tricks to reloading. over the years i have shown many how to reload and cast bullets. some went on to setup their own reloading room, others felt that it was better to buy bulk ammo. i reload/cast and will also buy bulk ammo when the price is right.
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Just make sure you choose the powder/s that work in the pressure range the gas system of the Garand was designed for so you don't damage the operating rod.
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    The Lee manual (Modern Reloading, by Richard Lee) has what I consider to be the best "how to" section with some good explanations as to the "whys", in the front of the book before the "recipes."

    glockman10mm makes an excellent point about loading for the Garand. I'd been loading pistol rounds for a while and when my father-in-law gave me his Garand, I had to develop a good load for it. That was my initiation into loading rifle cartridges. Fortunately, there is a wealth of great info in the public domain about appropriate loads for the Garand. Ultimately, I found a load in the Lyman manual which, with some charge weight adjustment, was equal to or better than the good results I got with Greek surplus ball ammo. Mine happened to be with 4895 powder, but there are several others out there which many will swear by.

    For the first-time rifle reloader, my advice is to pay attention to case length, and trim to the correct length. For the Garand, full-length resizing of fired brass is pretty much mandatory, so make sure your sizing die works the whole case and not just the case mouth. You absolutely need to lube the cases, and although I'm a cheapskate at heart, I found the convenience of spray lube worth the extra cost over using a lube pad. Overall cartridge length is a concern, from both the standpoint of fitting in the magazine, as well as the effect of bullet seating depth on the free volume inside the case.

    That's just a little to help you along the way. Do your research, read lots, and ask a lot of questions!
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    I'm with Frank. If you can spend a few sessions with an experienced loader, that goes a long way.
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    Member Array Whip12's Avatar
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    Look for the guys pick in' up brass at the range. A whole network right there.

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