Underwood 135grn .40

This is a discussion on Underwood 135grn .40 within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I have thought about a .357 sig barrel for my G23, but then I ran across the data on this round ; 135gn JHP running ...

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Thread: Underwood 135grn .40

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    Member Array subhuman's Avatar
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    Underwood 135grn .40

    I have thought about a .357 sig barrel for my G23, but then I ran across the data on this round ; 135gn JHP running at 1500fps out of a 4" barrel with a muzzel energy of 675ft-lb , this is deep into .357 sig territory, how does it compare in test against against the 125grn sigs,and how does it compare recoil wise, any info would be appreciated.

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    VIP Member Array Taurahe's Avatar
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    bang = ouch... too much work
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    Member Array MacReady's Avatar
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    For a long time, my preferred .40 cal load was the 135 grn Corbon JHP. This was back when the 180 grn stuff had a bad rep for not "stopping" BGs (late 90's). I never gel tested the stuff but did fire off a few magazines of it here and there (through a G22) and it was always quite an experience (massive muzzle blast and some extremely snappy recoil). I've only recently gotten into shooting .357 Sig so my basis for comparison is extremely limited but on paper at least, they should be about on par with one another?....

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    Member Array subhuman's Avatar
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    Im not recoil sensitive at all, i've spent years on .357 mags. .45 colts and .44 mags so the forty is not a tiger in my opinion i like a thump back into my palm. mostly im just wanting to run a mag through my 23 and wanting to know what others thought of it. if i like it may buy a few boxes. it will have a hard time replacing my confidence in my 165 grn carry ammo but I do like diversity and the .40 has a lot to offer even in the factory loads.

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    Member Array zeke4351's Avatar
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    I am a .357 Sig fan. The problem I see with the 135 grain .40 is the bullet is not designed for that kind of speed like the .357 Sig. But I would think the 125 grain Buffalo Barnes all copper .40 loading would do very well and it is not +p. It is fast and doesn't kick and the copper will stay together. There is a video testing the load on YouTube that is very impressive. I think the 135 grain Underwood will destruct before it penetrates enough to equal a .357 Sig full power loading. Wish someone would come up with a .40 necked down for a 102 grain .380 bullet. If the bullet was designed to handle that kind of speed that would be some kind of bad ass hand gun.


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    Member Array MacReady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeke4351 View Post
    I am a .357 Sig fan. The problem I see with the 135 grain .40 is the bullet is not designed for that kind of speed like the .357 Sig. But I would think the 125 grain Buffalo Barnes all copper .40 loading would do very well and it is not +p. It is fast and doesn't kick and the copper will stay together. There is a video testing the load on YouTube that is very impressive. I think the 135 grain Underwood will destruct before it penetrates enough to equal a .357 Sig full power loading. Wish someone would come up with a .40 necked down for a 102 grain .380 bullet. If the bullet was designed to handle that kind of speed that would be some kind of bad ass hand gun.


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    That's more or less my sense of it too. The .357 Sig was designed from the ground up as a 125 grn bullet which could (more or less) mimic the ballistics of the famed 125 grn .357 Magnum loads which had a great street reputation. The .40 cal is a completely different animal. It's a chopped 10mm and although you can certainly push a light .40 cal bullet out of that case to get into .357 Sig (or Magnum) territory, the bottom line is that .40 cal bullets were never designed to work at those velocities. All ammo tests I've seen on the really light .40 cal loads seems to have them expanding and stopping in gel at 10 inches or less, whereas the .357 Sig seems to consistently get in there several inches deeper.

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    Senior Member Array ExaltedOne's Avatar
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    You will feel the recoil every time you pull the trigger at least i did. I felt a slight discomfort in my palm on every trigger pull. The guy in the stall next to mine took a look just to see what I was firing. I used my M&P 40c so I can imagine how fast it would come out of a 4-5" barrel.

    Ill stick to the Underwood offerings of 180gr.

    Im not saying the recoil is a problem but if im gonna carry .40 I want 180gr.

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    Senior Member Array denclaste's Avatar
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    Most of the testing I've read and seen shows light for caliber bullets don't perform as well as standard/heavy weight do. Usually the light for caliber bullets were not designed for the high velocity they obtain and tend to penetrate minimally and the self destruct. The solid copper ones are a exception and seem to be able to function at higher velocities but at a far higher cost per unit. Velocity is not the be all end all that some people think it is for SD loads.

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    VIP Member Array 40Bob's Avatar
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    The 135 Grain 40 will act more like a 125 Grain 357 Magnum ie; the wound channel will be larger but shallower that what you will get from the 125 grain 357 Sig. Unless you need to penetrate car doors and such I would think it is a great load. I would use it but I have some 155 grain HST's that I use.
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    Distinguished Member Array Eric357's Avatar
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    155 gr kind interest me. The look good on paper. I notice SG has the GD 155 and the HST 165. Been thinking of getting one or the other.

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    Member Array mrwonderful's Avatar
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    Actually the Nosler 135gr JHP actually holds up better than you might think. Check the Vids below as loaded by Underwood in the 10mm. Exact same bullet but in the 10mm loaded 100fps faster. I think the 135gr. .40 Underwood load probably tracks closer to 1400-1450fps in 3.5 to 4 inch barrels. (I plan on chronographing that very soon) Of the .40 cal bullets in Gold Dot, only the 165gr is designed for higher speed.(in commercially loaded .40 loads) The 165 would be my pick in 10mm. The 10mm Underwood 180gr Gold Dot opens too fast but still holds together well. Penetration is therefore less than some would like. In .40 Underwood my favorites are the 155gr. Gold Dot and 155gr. Hornady XTP as well as the 135gr. Nosler load.

    From left to right Underwood 155gr Gold Dot, Underwood 155gr Hornady XTP and Underwood 135gr Nosler. Fired into milk jugs. Keep in mind you get more expansion in water than testing gel. If I recall correctly the Gold Dot and Hornady penetrated at least 3 jugs and the Nosler load two jugs.

    Underwood 40 Loads Slideshow by stevewonderful | Photobucket
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    The 135gr .40 is kind of interesting, it used to be the only 135gr ammo I had was some of the older Triton 135gr, loaded with Sierra JHP bullets. Those always seemed to fragment pretty badly, even at the typical velocity of ~1,300 fps. I do think the 135gr Nosler is a little bit tougher bullet than the Sierra, but either way the 135gr isn't that bad of a choice. I've read of several deer being shot with 135gr, both .40 and 10mm and both providing nearly identical results, almost complete penetration of the deer, which some fully exiting which seems to fly in the face of those who talk up the importance of sectional density and penetration. It seems like bullet design is a more important aspect really.

    The only thing I've ever shot with a 135gr Nosler was a crazed racoon, and a handload leaving my G23 at 1450-1500 fps did the trick and passed through it, and it was a big coon too so the bullet traveled over 12" and exited while also severing his right rear leg upon exit. Honestly based on what I had seen from the Sierra JHP, I didn't expect the Nosler to exit but it did. I wouldn't expect it to do as well as the 357 Sig against hard barriers, but against flesh from what I've seen and read, the 135gr .400" seems to be very effective.
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    Member Array TDH1961's Avatar
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    The 40 S&W 135gr and the 357 sig125gr were to take the place of the 357 magnum 125gr one shot stop average. For some reason they just didn't catch own. 135 grain bullets for the 40 S&W are hard to come by and reloading the 357sig is a lot harder than other rds. the 357 sig is a necked down 40 S&W and it is easy to crush the very small neck that the 357 sig case has. This is just my guess.

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