.357 or 9mm - Page 2

.357 or 9mm

This is a discussion on .357 or 9mm within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I have one of each. 9mm and .357SIG. Will be adding the .40 barrel this summer. They are both accurate and both easy to carry. ...

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Thread: .357 or 9mm

  1. #16
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    I have one of each. 9mm and .357SIG. Will be adding the .40 barrel this summer. They are both accurate and both easy to carry. The major difference between the two is you get two more rounds with 9mm.

    That said, I personally prefer the .357. With no way of testing this, therefore purely subjective, it seems to me that the .357 round is significantly faster than the 9mm. The .357 round seems also to pack a greater punch. Again subjective. Based on the results of hitting a gallon jug of water at 25' - the 9mm goes through and tears hold in the jug. The .357 goes through and takes most of the backside of the jug with it.

    There is a real difference in the price of ammo, but if you shop carefully you can find good prices on .357.
    George

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  2. #17
    Distinguished Member Array fed_wif_a_sig's Avatar
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    Deer are actually easier to drop than pigs, way easier. I rarely take anything but broadside or 3/4 shots when I hunt. Ya have to realize that a 357 Sig is more powerful than a 50 cal flintlock and either will drop a 120-160 pound deer rather easily. I dont hink I'd ever intentionally take a 9mm but 40 on up I feel rather comfortable with.

    Again, my issue with the 357 Sig is its overpenatration issues. I prefer my pistol ammo to be intended for use against a human target and not desigend for penetration of solid cover. The 357 Sig excells at penetration, and in human targets with no cover is a lil to much ooomph behind it.
    Steve
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  3. #18
    kpw
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    Quote Originally Posted by fed_wif_a_sig View Post
    Deer are actually easier to drop than pigs, way easier. I rarely take anything but broadside or 3/4 shots when I hunt. Ya have to realize that a 357 Sig is more powerful than a 50 cal flintlock and either will drop a 120-160 pound deer rather easily.
    What kind of flintlock are you using? I think my flintlock has your .357 beat in the power department by quite a bit. Do you mean a flintlock pistol?

  4. #19
    Distinguished Member Array fed_wif_a_sig's Avatar
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    No. I was thinking of the time I shot a deer with a 50 cal using a sabot with 45 gold dot jhp (it was a test of the round). I dont recall off the top of my head how much powder we used, but we intentionally loaded it to as closly match our duty issued load (Speer 230 gr Gold Dot JHP). It actually was very impressive. The 115# field dressed doe dropped where she had been hit with a broad side shot at about 20 yards. The round was recovered and had penetrated both lungs and caught part of the heart as well. I use a Dixie reporduction of a flintlock that my family made years ago but though I havent tested the balistics (which of course now I'll have to) I'd still wager that with a standard smokeless load and 50 cal round ball its pushing about the same if not less than a 357 Sig load. (If I'm wrong I will gladly admit it once the test are completed).

    We've kinda hijacked the thread, but when it comes to ammo selection, I will suggest the same analogy that the FBI did after their extensive reasearch after the Miami shooting. A person is more likely to do better in a gun fight if they are comfortable with the weapon and round that they are carrying. As long as the individual knows the limitations and typical results (ie overpenetration) of the round and apply it to their training and skills (with the 357 Sig I do my dangdest to assume a kneeling position when shooting due to its record of overpenetration) the better the results will be.
    Steve
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  5. #20
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    The .357sig is a 9mm (.355") bullet stacked on a 40 S&W case. The added case size and bottle necked design offers some advantages and some disadvantages:
    The .357sig will allow higher velocities in the same bullet weight than tha 9mm. Higher velocity typically results in more energy, greater hystro-stactic pressure, and thus faster expension.
    The .357sig has a narrow bullet going into a wide throat inside the gun which generally improves feeding (It's not unlike throating a barrel by 0.050"
    The .357sig ammo is about 15% larger in diameter, so you get fewer rounds. Most guns will shed 2 bullets for the same frame.
    The .357sig ammo is more expensive, so if your practice is limited by ammo cost, you'll practice less and a well placed 9mm bullet is more effective than a poorly placed .357sig bullet.

    357sig bullets do 1 of two things generally. If the factory has specific .357 sig bullets, rather than loading bullets designed for 9mm, they are generally very tough bullets that often suffer from over penetration. If the factory uses standard velocity 9mm bullets, they will hit extremely fast, violently expand and dump their energy near the surface.

    With good round selection, if your practice time is not limited by ammo cost, the .357sig is a superior round, however if you will practice less due to the more expensive ammunition, the 9mm will be supperior due to superior training.

    I'm not sure if that answers your question, or just poses more.

  6. #21
    New Member Array shadewpi's Avatar
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    The .357sig is a 9mm (.355") bullet stacked on a 40 S&W case. The added case size and bottle necked design offers some advantages and some disadvantages:
    The .357sig will allow higher velocities in the same bullet weight than tha 9mm. Higher velocity typically results in more energy, greater hystro-stactic pressure, and thus faster expension.
    The .357sig has a narrow bullet going into a wide throat inside the gun which generally improves feeding (It's not unlike throating a barrel by 0.050"
    The .357sig ammo is about 15% larger in diameter, so you get fewer rounds. Most guns will shed 2 bullets for the same frame.
    The .357sig ammo is more expensive, so if your practice is limited by ammo cost, you'll practice less and a well placed 9mm bullet is more effective than a poorly placed .357sig bullet.

    357sig bullets do 1 of two things generally. If the factory has specific .357 sig bullets, rather than loading bullets designed for 9mm, they are generally very tough bullets that often suffer from over penetration. If the factory uses standard velocity 9mm bullets, they will hit extremely fast, violently expand and dump their energy near the surface.

    With good round selection, if your practice time is not limited by ammo cost, the .357sig is a superior round, however if you will practice less due to the more expensive ammunition, the 9mm will be supperior due to superior training.

    I'm not sure if that answers your question, or just poses more.

  7. #22
    kpw
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    Quote Originally Posted by fed_wif_a_sig View Post
    We've kinda hijacked the thread, but when it comes to ammo selection, I will suggest the same analogy that the FBI did after their extensive reasearch after the Miami shooting. A person is more likely to do better in a gun fight if they are comfortable with the weapon and round that they are carrying. As long as the individual knows the limitations and typical results (ie overpenetration) of the round and apply it to their training and skills (with the 357 Sig I do my dangdest to assume a kneeling position when shooting due to its record of overpenetration) the better the results will be.
    Your right, sorry folks. And I agree with the above, comfort and confidence are the important things.

  8. #23
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    fed - flintlocks. Nice. Here in PA we have a late flintlock season. I have a 50 cal Lyman Trade Flinter for whitetail. That is if I am not using archery. I do hunt w/ modern compound bows, no longbows for me.

    It is neat to shoot a flintlock rifle.

  9. #24
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    How much of a price dif. is it between the 9 and the 357?

    I have always heard the .357 has a greater stopping record than the 9...is this accurate?

  10. #25
    Distinguished Member Array fed_wif_a_sig's Avatar
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    ducky.....their is a price difference when purchasing practice ammo and carry ammo for a 9mm to 357 Sig. The 9mm is just more widly used thus more ammo.

    As far as stopping power, I have seen folks take many a number of hits from many a number of different calibers and some drop instantly with a 22 while others keep fighting while hit with a 223 (even 308).

    I carry 9mm, 357 Sig (not by choice but by issue) 40 cal, 45 cal 38 spl and 357 Mag. Now I never rely on one round doing the job, and prepare to put more down as long as the threat is present.

    Neither is more accurage over the other. The shooter might be more accurate with a 9mm as it has less recoil.

    Basically just realize that the 357 Sig is nothing more than a 9mm Magnum. Both have good results on the street. I never have loved the 357 as to me it wasnt necessary. The purchase and issue of that round was done by most agencies because Sig sold them so cheaply and even less than their own pistols in 40, 45 or 9mm.

    I am not comfortable because of the overpenatration I have read about. The choice is yours to carry what you are comfortable with.
    Steve
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  11. #26
    Member Array lilducky08's Avatar
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    I have also heard that the .357 round jams far less than the 9mm based on shape of round...true or no?

  12. #27
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    I've got a Sig226 in both 9MM and .357 Sig.

    The 9mm is better for quick follow up shots.
    The .357 is very loud compared to the 9mm.
    The 9mm holds 15.
    The .357 holds 13.
    as for jams....neither gun jams.The .357 has more muzzle flip than the 9mm.

    When shooting steel plates, the .357 hits them so much harder that there is no doubt which is the more powerful round. Not very scientific I know, but seeing is beleiving.

    Since both guns are the same except for caliber, my choice for carry would be the .357 Sig...because I am a firm beleiver in carrying the biggest round that one can control. Since a handgun is a compromise anyway, why bother with the less powerful round ?

    Its true that the 9MM can be had for cheaper...but the .357 isnt that bad.

    Either caliber will serve the purpose.
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  13. #28
    Distinguished Member Array fed_wif_a_sig's Avatar
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    One positive not for Sigs is that I have rarely ever had a jam or malfunction. The only ones I have observed have been when the entire weapon became disabeled due to certain pins falling out or breaking. This has happened to two other folks on my team while deployed on missions. Not a comforting feeling.
    Steve
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  14. #29
    Senior Member Array threefeathers's Avatar
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    I carry 357 Sig and I reload my practice rounds. I was shocked at what a flat shooter this is at 50 meters. If I have to make that rare head shot, or a snake shot, I can do it with this round. I don't feel unarmed with a 9mm and have 8 various 9mms, but the Sig 229 in 357 is my daily companion. I documented having to draw it indefending a young girl last June. It was damn nice to have.

  15. #30
    Member Array lilducky08's Avatar
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    Sounds like I probably don't need to be thinking about the .357 SIG and stick with the 9mm. Added cost, muzzle flip, and overpenetration are probably the three reasons. Cost is important because I do want to log some serious rounds on my gun to make sure I am ready when I need to be or else why carry. Muzzle flip because I want my wife to enjoy shooting it to, and tends to be more accurate. Finally overpenetration is a problem you don't want to have when you got a bg to deal with and the potential for innocents to be around...
    thanks everyone.

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