Bore size does matter, but not in a way you'd imagine.

This is a discussion on Bore size does matter, but not in a way you'd imagine. within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've been playing around with my newly acquired .44 Magnum and I've noticed something about the catridges that at first seemed meaningless but the more ...

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Thread: Bore size does matter, but not in a way you'd imagine.

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    Bore size does matter, but not in a way you'd imagine.

    I've been playing around with my newly acquired .44 Magnum and I've noticed something about the catridges that at first seemed meaningless but the more I play with the thought of it the more I realize its significance.

    These casings are very large. Not huge mind you, but large.

    Now at first the thought of such a gigantic cartridge as a .44 Special that has the same energy as your average 9mm load seems like a bad thing. I mean after all it just seems like a waste of brass and space.

    But the more I play with it, the more I realize how my short stubby fingers find easy purchase on these catridges. For contrast, I hate stuffing little .22's into my Rossi's cylinder. It's awkward and I am constantly dropping them.

    That's one thing I've always hated is stuffing catridges into magazines, at least when it comes to handguns. Rifle catridges have never bothered me. I hate stuffing 17 cartridges into my P89's aftermarket magazine. It's uncomfortable and awkward even with a speed loader. Truthfully I have always liked revolvers better because one simply slides the catridges in with no damnable spring to overcome. Sliding A .38 Special into place is a much less refined motion.

    A 38 Special however is a fairly large catridge, noticeably larger than a 9mm catridge. I think it's that extra length that I like so much, and the rim at the bottom, because these features make it easier to grab and pick up.

    Could it be that my problem is that I simply need to shoot a cartridge that's easier to handle? It sounds really stupid but I'm having a much easier time with these larger catridges, and I realize now that I've always had trouble manipulating small objects.

    And thinking about it some more, a larger cartridge means a larger hole in the cylinder to aim for when inserting a single round or a speedloader. It could also mean an easier time of loading it into a magazine. It means being able to find it when you do drop it. It means less fumbling around in general.

    A strange reason to like a caliber I admit, but I'm now intrigued by this aspect of large bore calibers/catridges in general.

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    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    you need one of these then avaible in 454 casull and 480 ruger... I sure want one

    I also understand where you comming from not everyone can be a watch maker and great with small things .. I prefer a bigger cartridge to get a better grip on it 38 is goood 357 little better 41 mag little better yet 44 now were getting some where 45 colt almost there...454 casull .. houston i think we found it :smily1094
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    Not Stupid At All

    "It sounds really stupid but I'm having a much easier time with these larger catridges, and I realize now that I've always had trouble manipulating small objects."
    Lots of folks have trouble with small objects. So...bigger would be better.
    Another thing that REALLY HELPS to speed up reloading ANY revolver is to have the rear opening of your cylinder holes very slightly chamfered to take off that sharp knife edge.
    It's AMAZING how doing that cuts down on the tendency of your cartridges to always "catch that edge" when inserting them into their respective "nearly same size" holes.
    Every one of my revolvers have the rear cartridge hole edges very lightly chamfered.
    It's a MOST WORTHWHILE modification to speed up the reloading process.

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    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    Actually QK one of my goals is to send all of my wheelies to the Performance Center for a Combat Revolver Package for that very reason. The only thing stopping me is not just the money but the $100 it will cost to ship it there and back plus being without one of my pretties for God knows how long.

    That and I feel I might as well get a Performance Enchancement Package done at the same time. What I really want is someone to take the darn thing apart, clean it up, put it all back together correctly, slick it up, and make sure it works, so I'm probably wise to do both at once.

    But back on topic, I'm glad I am not insane. Every reason I've heard for liking a larger caliber was a ballistic one, not an ergonomic one.

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    Nope, you're not insane. While it's not a big problem I have to admit it is easier for me to manipulate and load a .45acp much easier than a 9mm. And I guess as I think about it, that's one of the things I like about a 1911. Single stack magazines are much easier for me to load than double stacks.
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    Coimhéad fearg fhear na foighde; Beware the anger of a patient man.

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    Former Member Array The Tourist's Avatar
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    The case size of the larger cartridges at the turn of the century was to accomodate blackpowder and the bulky double-base powders of that era. Even in the 1970's I used Blue-Dot, 2400, Unique and AL-8.

    Now we have spherical powders like A/A#5 and A/A#7. The fact that a .45 ACP is just as powerful as the .45 ACP proves the point.

    During the 1930's Elmer Keith loaded .44 SPL's up to levels which exceed our .44 Mag now. Using double and triple loads of powder (duplex and triplex loads) and firearms built around 1905, he drove a cast slug through a creosote phone pole. He group, who called themselves the .44 Associates even killed numerous game in Africa.

    I believe a .454 Casull is nice, but a bucket of ice is cheaper.

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