Pistol VS chest mount mag pouches test

Pistol VS chest mount mag pouches test

This is a discussion on Pistol VS chest mount mag pouches test within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Or, how to shoot stuff and have fun while fooling people into thinking that you're working: Disclaimer. Do not try this at home, do not ...

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Thread: Pistol VS chest mount mag pouches test

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
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    Pistol VS chest mount mag pouches test

    Or, how to shoot stuff and have fun while fooling people into thinking that you're working:

    Disclaimer. Do not try this at home, do not run with scissors or pointy sticks. I am not an expert, YMMV. Whatever.


    The topic of insurgents wearing chest mounted magazine pouches came up at a gunshop counter debate the other day. We checked the Box O Truth The Box O' Truth #9 - Magazines vs. Rifle Rounds - Page 1 and found out that they had only tested rifle rounds. We had some out of service AR mags, plenty of ammo, and a curious mind, so we set up our test. We used an AR mag full of empty brass on top of a bucket full of wet newspaer packed down. The mag was in a canvas bandoleer to hold it all together.

    Guns were a Glock 26, 27, and 36. (snubs to keep the velocity down. No point in shooting an insurgent at close range so we simulated distance this way)

    Ammo was 124 gr Gold Dot, 124gr +P Gold saber, 124gr and 147gr Hydra Shok in 9mm. In .40 we had 180gr Ranger SXT, 180gr Remington JHP, 155 and 180gr Hydra Shok. In .45 there were Gold Dot, Gold Saber, Hydra Shok, and WWB JHP, all 230 grains. One round of FMJ in each caliber was also shot. As these typically exit a single bucket, they were shot last as a control.

    You will notice there are no pics of expanded projectiles here. All the JHP we tried fragmented into bits. There were several exits from the side of the bucket from larger fragments, but nothing recognizable bigger than a 5 grain or so jacket fragment could be identified in the wetpack. Brass fragments were found blasted out the back of the magazine and into the wetpack, but with limited penetration. We initially thought that all the FMJ had exited until we were cleaning up. We found a .45 FMJ and a crushed, but intact .45 Gold Dot on the floor of the range just behind the bucket. Both had aparantly exited but with very little energy. We also found a recognizable fragment of a 9mm Gold Dot weighing about 28 grains.

    Lessons learned? Well. In this limited and unscientific test, pistol rounds from snub handguns still had enough energy to be lethal after passing through a loaded magazine in a cloth bandoleer. Penetration was low for most JHP, but fragmentation was intense, as were the secondary wounds from the brass and magazine fragments. Evidence of larger fragments was found, but none were recovered and the performance of those fragments was not predictable. Not sure why the .45 Gold Dot didn't break up. Even if it is a bonded round, all other JHP and other Gold Dots did. Since it plugged up and acted like an FMJ, it performed just like the 230gr FMJ and was indeed found at the same place. The biggest fragment of all the other rounds found by weight was a Gold Dot, although a big, but light, jacket fragment of a 9mm Hydra Shok was found. I carry Gold Dot in a lot of my spare magazines for increased penetration and that choice seems to be validated. Most of my carry mags are Hydra shok or Gold Saber.

    And don't forget the biggest lesson learned. Working at an indoor range and shooting stuff is fun, even more fun if other people think you're working. Comments are welcome and we take requests. Thanks to pileofbrass for the help and to the boss for putting up with us.


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    Senior Member Array jualdeaux's Avatar
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    Actually, I notice no pictures or links to pictures.

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    Nice post, maybe the wounds were lethal but maybe not quickly; though they were probably bad enough for a well aimed second shot.

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    Pics

    Actually, there were only two recovered bullets and two small fragments. Not much picture worthy stuff. Please be patient until tomorrow, but I was hoping to recover a lot more bullets.

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    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
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    Pics

    Here are the pictures. The magazines were a broken Okay Mil-spec 30 round and a Bushmaster 10 round. No working hi-cap magazines were harmed in this experiment. From left to right are a large fragment of cartridge brass, a Hydra Shok 9mm jacket, a fragment of 9mm Gold Dot, a 230 gr. Gold Dot and a 230 gr. ball round. Notice how twisted the cartridge brass fragment is. Its big and wicked sharp, but not very heavy. Comments and requests are always welcome.



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    Distinguished Member Array AutoFan's Avatar
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    Do you suppose a steel or polymer mag would do better (or worse)?

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    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
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    Mags

    I think that it looks like a lot of damage was caused by fragmentation of the bullets as well as the brass in the magazine. Notice how big the exit holes are. I think a steel mag would increase the fragmentation of the bullet since its harder. I think the ploymer mag would not break up the bullet as much, but would probably let more brass fragments out of the back. The brass was pretty torn up. Notice that the fragment in the picture is turned upside down and inside out, folded up and generally every which way but loose. I'd like to try a heavy steel AK mag, problem is I don't have a broken one. Aparantly they're indestructable

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