.380 vs. .38 +P

This is a discussion on .380 vs. .38 +P within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Does anyone know which has the grater amount of stopping power?...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 45

Thread: .380 vs. .38 +P

  1. #1
    Member Array GUDWyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    31

    .380 vs. .38 +P

    Does anyone know which has the grater amount of stopping power?
    "My weapon has never hurt anyone. It never will. If someone dies by my hand, it is my fault. The weapon is blameless." - Mikhail Kalashnikov

    Sic Nos Sic Sacra Tuemur- family motto, translation: Thus We Guard Our Sacred Rights

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,459
    Check out the following

    Handloads.Com - Stopping Power
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  4. #3
    Member Array S.D.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Mesa, Az
    Posts
    63
    No doubt a .38+p has way better stopping power.

  5. #4
    Member Array GUDWyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    31
    thanks, that's definitely going to become bookmarked, but does anybody know about the joules (in general) of either bullet
    "My weapon has never hurt anyone. It never will. If someone dies by my hand, it is my fault. The weapon is blameless." - Mikhail Kalashnikov

    Sic Nos Sic Sacra Tuemur- family motto, translation: Thus We Guard Our Sacred Rights

  6. #5
    Senior Member Array Shizzlemah's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    723
    To calculate energy (in ft-lbs, not joules, sorry) for any bullet:

    Weight in grains * velocity in FPS * velocity in FPS / 450240

    For example,
    92 gr * 900 FPS * 900 FPS / 450240 = 165 ft lbs
    158 gr * 1000 FPS * 1000 FPS / 450240 = 351 ft lbs

  7. #6
    Member Array Seraph's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Secret City
    Posts
    357
    Ft/lbs don't stop an attack. You need a nice, wide tunnel through the CNS for that. The .38 Special is your clear choice here.
    Under the sword lifted high, there is Hell, making you tremble. But go ahead, and you have the land of Bliss.

    ~ Miyamoto Musashi

  8. #7
    Member Array HarleyDriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    South shore of Lake Pontchartrain
    Posts
    47
    Quote Originally Posted by Shizzlemah View Post
    To calculate energy (in ft-lbs, not joules, sorry) for any bullet:

    Weight in grains * velocity in FPS * velocity in FPS / 450240

    For example,
    92 gr * 900 FPS * 900 FPS / 450240 = 165 ft lbs
    158 gr * 1000 FPS * 1000 FPS / 450240 = 351 ft lbs
    No need to calculate. Federal has free software on their site (2007 Interactive Ballistics Catalog) that will compare and graph velocity and energy for all of their loads. It's a great resource.

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array AZ Husker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    4,244
    Regular load .38 special far outshines the .380.
    Plus P .38 special blows it away, not even close!
    Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.

  10. #9
    Member Array homepcmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    93
    A .38 special can "bury" the .380 ACP... if fired from a 20" lever action carbine.

    My point?

    Let's first ask the person... using which specific platform?

    Too many answers and not enough questions.

    Are we talking about comparing a Bersa 380 with an S&W ultra-lite with LESS than 2" barrel?

    No part of a firearm stands on its own merit and the most important part is the person who uses it.

    Has the person ever fired a 2" revolver with +p "kick hard but also rip your hand off" recoil?

    It's the package deal we should look at. Imagine try to shoot a .45 ACP... using the "platform" of a KT 380 or the new Ruger LCP?

    How many shots can YOU get off?

    And would you hit or would you miss?

    Just wanted to point this out to the original poster.

    You still have other questions that need to be answered before you can get a fair answer on which one has a "better" stop.

    Just my opinion.
    “We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm” - George Orwell

  11. #10
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,991
    Wow! And I thought all he was considering when he asked the question was, "assuming reasonable hits".

  12. #11
    Member Array homepcmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    93
    "Stopping power" is just a unit of measurement... not a tactical philosophy

    You know who said that?

    Evan Marshall... who literally wrote three books on stopping power.

    And you know what he carries?

    A Glock 26 9mm, a .38 Scandium J frame revolver and a KT P32.

    This person who posted first here is a new member. Shouldn't he get "more" than the "stopping power" claim.

    His or his family's life can depend on the answers he get here.

    Again... just my opinion.
    “We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm” - George Orwell

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array aus71383's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    2,543
    A .38 Special is a lot better than a .380 ACP. The bullet weighs almost twice as much, so it will penetrate better. The recoil is nothing to worry about. An alloy J-frame .38 is not hard to shoot fast. It doesn't break your wrist and rip the gun out of your hands. It just goes "pop!" and sends a bullet downrange. Anything with a short sight radius and a small grip will be hard to aim and shoot fast with.

    That's just my opinion though, worth what you paid for it.

    Austin

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array obxned's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    OBX, NC
    Posts
    2,655
    Run some 38 +P through a chronograph using a snubbie and tell me how much 'stopping power' it has. Most velocity and energy figures for the .38 are measured using a 4" barrel.
    Last edited by obxned; March 3rd, 2008 at 08:42 PM.
    "If we loose Freedom here, there's no place to escape to. This is the Last Place on Earth!" Ronald Reagan

  15. #14
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,991
    The last Winchester +P 158 grain SWC-HP ammo (the old "FBI Load") that I chronographed through my 2-inch S&W Chief's Special clocked 925 fps. Same box yielded 992 fps from a 4-inch S&W Model 10. Of course that was in 1996 so ammo may have changed.

    Of course I'm old fashioned and feel the .38 Special is perfectly satisfactory served up in a 2-inch barrel when used with bullets of decent weight whether in +P guise or not.

    I kinda hate to see the .38 Special round relegated to snubbies in the eyes of modern shooters. The round is more versatile and flexible than that. It's natural home is in 4-inch "service" revolvers and 6-inch target revolvers. I most often carry a 4-inch S&W Model 10. It's more concealable than many suppose. It also is great for range or field use. Other great .38 Special revolvers that should be put to use more often are the Colt Police Positive, Official Police, Diamondback, and Officer's Model, the Smith & Wesson Model 10 M&P, Model 14 K-38 Masterpiece, and Model 15 Combat Masterpiece, and the Ruger Speed Six and Security Six in their .38 Special variations. Any of these make great range, field, and home defense choices and the models that have 4-inch barrels can be concealed quite handily.

    I've had far less field experience with Texas critters with the .380 than with the .38 Special but will say that the .380 pales in comparison in my view.

  16. #15
    Senior Member Array Ragin Cajun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    809
    The 38 has a larger bullet and more powder in the case. You do the math. The 38 will deliver more Kinetic Energy then the 380. Kinetic Energy is what some refer to as "Stopping Power"


    Kinetic energy is the energy of motion. An object which has motion - whether it be vertical or horizontal motion - has kinetic energy. There are many forms of kinetic energy - vibrational (the energy due to vibrational motion), rotational (the energy due to rotational motion), and translational (the energy due to motion from one location to another). To keep matters simple, we will focus upon translational kinetic energy. The amount of translational kinetic energy (from here on, the phrase kinetic energy will refer to translational kinetic energy) which an object has depends upon two variables: the mass (m) of the object and the speed (v) of the object.


    This equation reveals that the kinetic energy of an object is directly proportional to the square of its speed. That means that for a twofold increase in speed, the kinetic energy will increase by a factor of four. For a threefold increase in speed, the kinetic energy will increase by a factor of nine. And for a fourfold increase in speed, the kinetic energy will increase by a factor of sixteen. The kinetic energy is dependent upon the square of the speed. As it is often said, an equation is not merely a recipe for algebraic problem-solving, but also a guide to thinking about the relationship between quantities.

    Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity; it does not have a direction. Unlike velocity, acceleration, force, and momentum, the kinetic energy of an object is completely described by magnitude alone. Like work and potential energy, the standard metric unit of measurement for kinetic energy is the Joule. As might be implied by the above equation, 1 Joule is equivalent to 1 kg*(m/s)^2.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

.38 p vs .380
,

.38 vs .380

,

.380 vs .38

,
.380 vs .38 p
,

38 p vs 380

,
38 special vs 380 ballistics
,

38 vs 380

,
38 vs 380 ballistics
,
380 plus p
,

380 vs 38

,

380 vs 38 p

,

380 vs 38 special ballistics

Click on a term to search for related topics.