Sources of 5.56?

This is a discussion on Sources of 5.56? within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; 5.56mm NATO is designed to develop a chamber pressure of about 4300 bar (~60,000 psi). Remington .223 develops a chamber pressure of about 3700 bar ...

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Thread: Sources of 5.56?

  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array Anubis's Avatar
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    5.56mm NATO is designed to develop a chamber pressure of about 4300 bar (~60,000 psi). Remington .223 develops a chamber pressure of about 3700 bar (~50,000 psi). There are other differences detailed in the link The Gun Zone -- SAAMI on 5.56 v. .223 Remington provided earlier in the thread by G96X0.

    Obviously if a chamber designed to contain 3700 bar is subjected to 4300 bar, stress could exceed the design limit. It depends on the engineering overkill. A bridge might be rated to support 20 tons, but be designed to fail at 40 tons.

    I have read of primers being blown out when fired; this is a sign that at least the primer seating (or whatever it's called) design pressure has been exceeded.
    Last edited by Anubis; October 29th, 2008 at 05:34 PM.

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    VIP Member Array automatic slim's Avatar
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    Not to confuse the issue further, but on my Colt AR-15 the barrel isn't even marked. The lower receiver states "Cal..223". All this time I thought AR-15's were just M-16's restricted to semiauto fire, but all other specs were identical.
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  4. #33
    Distinguished Member Array GWRedDragon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by automatic slim View Post
    Not to confuse the issue further, but on my Colt AR-15 the barrel isn't even marked. The lower receiver states "Cal..223". All this time I thought AR-15's were just M-16's restricted to semiauto fire, but all other specs were identical.
    That's what I thought, too.
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  5. #34
    Distinguished Member Array Anubis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by automatic slim View Post
    ...on my Colt AR-15 the barrel isn't even marked. The lower receiver states "Cal..223".
    My Stag Arms lefty AR-15's receiver has "CAL 5.56MM" stamped on it. The relevant Stag Arms web page states "5.56 Nato Chamber".

    There are several varieties of 5.56mm. What I have is M193.

    The following is from http://www.thegunzone.com/556faq.html

    "Both M193, with its copper-jacketed and cannelured lead-core bullet (see representative cartridge drawing), and its companion M196 tracing round (identified by a red tip), are now used during range training. The latter is designed to trace out to 500 yards.

    The M195 is used with the grenade projection adapter.

    The M197 High Pressure test (HPT) is identified by its plain tip and silver, as opposed to brass, case.

    The M199 is used during mechanical training (loading practice), "simulated firing to detect flinching of personnel when firing," and for "inspecting and testing the weapon mechanisms." Case has six (6) longitudinal corrugations (flutings) and the primer pocket is open to prevent wear to the firing pin.

    The M200 is deployed during training when simulated live fire is desired. The case mouth is closed with a seven-petal rosette crimp and has a violet tip. (An M15A2 blank-firing device must be installed to fire this ammunition.) Note: use of the original M200 blank cartridges, identified by their white tip, resulted in a malfunction-inducing residue buildup, and were replaced by the current, violet-tipped blank cartridge.

    The M202 (SSX822) is the new 58 grain FMJ "tri-metal penetrator."

    The M232 is used for function testing. The entire round has black chemical finish and no primer.

    The NATO standard M855 round is intended for use against light matériel targets and personnel, but not vehicles. Identified by a green tip, the 62 grain projectile is constructed of a lead alloy core topped by a steel penetrator, the whole contained within a gilding (copper alloy) metal jacket. The primer and case are waterproof. (See representative cartridge drawing.) Despite the round's penetration abilities, BATF has specifically exempted it from the AP ban.

    The M856, identified by an orange tip on its copper-plated steel jacket, is used for observation of fire, incendiary effects and signaling. As with all all illuminated bullets except the new Hornady rounds introduced in the mid-'90s, it is hollowed out at the base and a tracing compound appended. (See representative cartridge drawing.) The perceived requirement to stabilze this round caused the M16A2 to have a 1:7-inch rate of twist instead of the more desirable 1:9-inch. Much longer than the earlier M196 tracer bullets (55 grain), it is designed to trace out to 875 yards.

    The M862 Short Range Training Ammunition (SRTA) provides a realistic training alternative to M193/M855 service rounds. With a maximum range of 250 meters, the "plastic practice" round has an effective range of 25 meters, but requires the M2 Training Bolt when used in the M16A2 Rifle.

    The M995, identified by its black-tip, uses a shaped tungsten core in a jacketed envelope, and penetrates 12 mm armour plate of 300 HB at 100 meters. It began development in 1992 as part of the Soldier Enhancement Program, and its primary mission is to improve incapacitation capability against troops within lightly armored threat vehicles.

    The XM996 Dim Tracer ammunition provides the user with a tracing round which is invisible when viewed with the naked eye but which can be seen when viewed through night vision devices (NVDs) and does not cause visual interference to the wearer of a NVD. Standard tracer ammunition provides excessive illumination/visual interference ("blooming" effect) to the user when viewed through NVDs."

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