Old Ammo

This is a discussion on Old Ammo within the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Recently acquired a lot of my grandfathers guns and some ammunition in a few different calibers. this stuff is easily 30+ years old. is it ...

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Thread: Old Ammo

  1. #1
    Member Array DetroitMedic's Avatar
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    Old Ammo

    Recently acquired a lot of my grandfathers guns and some ammunition in a few different calibers. this stuff is easily 30+ years old. is it still safe to shoot? it has been kept in a dry closet and basically just looks old, no real deformities or anything. I dunno, what do you guys think?

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Array dnowell's Avatar
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    People still shoot world war 2 surplus ammo when they can find it. Saw Nazi marked ammo at a gun show the other day. You should be fine. Wouldn't use it for self defense of course. Ammo loads now are generally hotter than they used to be.

    Get any neat old guns? Pictures?

  4. #3
    Member Array oldogy's Avatar
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    I am currently going through a lot of old ammo. Nothing wrong with it.
    oldogy
    Government is out of control
    "If gun laws in fact worked, the sponsors of this type of legislation should have no difficulty drawing upon long lists of examples of crime rates reduced by such legislation. That they cannot do so after a century and a half of trying -- " Sen Orrin G. Hatch

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    It should be just fine to shoot.

    I would check to see if any of it has collector value first before you shoot it all up.

    There are cartridge collectors out there.

    Post some photos if you can.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

  6. #5
    Distinguished Member Array TerriLi's Avatar
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    Watch out for corrosive ammo, any ammo under 30 is generally safe. Anything over 30 can be corrosive and needs more care with cleaning.
    I know not what this "overkill" means.

    Honing the knives, Cleaning the longguns, Stocking up ammo.

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    No problems. Cull any that show corrosion and clean properly to remove any effects of corrosive priming and you'll be fine.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

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    Member Array DetroitMedic's Avatar
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    got a M1 carbine
    an FN-49
    a crappy RG .38 spl
    marlin 70 .22 LR
    lol and an old montgomery ward 12ga shotgun

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    I've got lots of old ammo from various sources. Goes BANG just fine as long as it's been stored properly.

    +1 on possible collector value.

    I wouldn't use them my EDC though.
    CCW permit holder for Idaho, Utah, Pennsylvania, Maine and New Hampshire. I can carry in your country but not my own.

  10. #9
    Member Array kdydak's Avatar
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    I bought some german surplus NATO 7.62mm a few months ago. It is marked DAG 69 (Does that make it 40 years old ?).

    Roughly 10% of the cartridges will not fire on the fist strike of the hammer. Since I am not thrilled about idea of handling almost exploded little copper grenades I have been pulling the charging handle back (AR15) just enough to re-prime the hammer then letting it go. Re-firing usually fixes the problem.

    I had one round though fire by itself when the free floating pin struck it after letting charging handle go (did not fire on the first trigger pull so the primer was dented when I let the handle go).

  11. #10
    Member Array gilliland87's Avatar
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    30 plus years

    If there is no visible corrosion in it go for it. The ammo itself may very well be corrosive to your barrel clean them well. And remember hang fires are not a myth, wait at least 30 seconds before opening the chamber if the round fails to go boom.

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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdydak View Post
    I bought some german surplus NATO 7.62mm a few months ago. It is marked DAG 69 (Does that make it 40 years old ?).

    Roughly 10% of the cartridges will not fire on the fist strike of the hammer. Since I am not thrilled about idea of handling almost exploded little copper grenades I have been pulling the charging handle back (AR15) just enough to re-prime the hammer then letting it go. Re-firing usually fixes the problem.

    I had one round though fire by itself when the free floating pin struck it after letting charging handle go (did not fire on the first trigger pull so the primer was dented when I let the handle go).
    you got surplus 7.62 your firing out of an AR15,you must have a conversion barrel,I would check the primer to make sure you are getting a good hit,a weak hammer spring can cause light hits especially on hard primers
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
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    VIP Member Array Pikachu711's Avatar
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    This does raise a question that has been burdening me. How old is too old to consider NOT firing it? Is there a point when we should not be chambering older ammo in our various rifles & handguns?
    "Gun control is being able to hit your target."
    Glock 26

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    Member Array Armorkingg's Avatar
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    As long as it isn't coroded and is clean, it should be fine.

    Good question Pickachu711, I've never seen an answer to that. If I had WW1 or 2 ammo I I would probly collect it rather than shoot it.

  15. #14
    VIP Member Array Pikachu711's Avatar
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    I seriously doubt if the average gun owner would chamber WW I or II ammo. First, no offense to members who may have served in any of those campaigns, but that is VERY old ammunition. It would probably the best advice to not chamber that vintage ammunition.
    "Gun control is being able to hit your target."
    Glock 26

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