Night Sights for Glock?

This is a discussion on Night Sights for Glock? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hey everyone, I carry a Glock 27 and I LOVE the sights and what I love is the "U" rear sight. Those of you who ...

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Thread: Night Sights for Glock?

  1. #1
    Member Array Dsimon11's Avatar
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    Night Sights for Glock?

    Hey everyone, I carry a Glock 27 and I LOVE the sights and what I love is the "U" rear sight. Those of you who own Glocks know what I am talking about. I am very interested in night sights, but upon research and to my knowledge they do not make a rear "U" night sight, all I see are the rear two dot design.

    Does anyone know if they make a "U" rear sight? I do not like the three hot sight system. I much prefer to put the dot in the "U" so to speak. I swear I shoot tighter groups

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array SpencerB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dsimon11 View Post
    Hey everyone, I carry a Glock 27 and I LOVE the sights and what I love is the "U" rear sight. Those of you who own Glocks know what I am talking about. I am very interested in night sights, but upon research and to my knowledge they do not make a rear "U" night sight, all I see are the rear two dot design.

    Does anyone know if they make a "U" rear sight? I do not like the three hot sight system. I much prefer to put the dot in the "U" so to speak. I swear I shoot tighter groups
    I have been wondering the same thing for my G19, I have been contemplating just replacing the front sight because I too like the "U" rear sight.

  4. #3
    VIP Member Array tokerblue's Avatar
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    I don't know of any tritium sights with the "U" sight. I recently bought Trijicon night sights (green front/yellow rear) and I am still getting used to the 3 dot sights. I think your only alternative may be to just buy the tritium front sight if you want to keep the stock rear sights.

  5. #4
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    Just get a tritium front sight for your Glock IMO. Everything will be okay.

  6. #5
    New Member Array calam's Avatar
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    yeah, here ya go...

    http://www.mmcsight.com/

    I had a set of I.W.I. / PTs that were the first night sights I ever bought, on a P229, they were going dim but were still, IIRC under 7 years old when I gave them a call, they had me ship them back, & while there I requested they ADD a bar channel under the groove, kinda like this--> o_o as the rear were orange & front is green, they happily added the green bar, & I honestly cannot remember if I had to pay for the refurb (pretty sure it would have been a swap out, actual refurbs are a PITA on these & just not done i think) or the customization, I honestly think I only paid for shipping (I think I was either still barely under warranty or just past it), but as I look on the website linked above, I see their custom bar-dot sights mentioned, but I am fairly certain at that time (this was several years back now), the bar_dot was not an option for my model of sights. I DO remember my customer service experience with the company being "top-notch" to "above the bar".
    As to how they have performed, that is another story. I will say that colors other than green are expected to dim faster than green, but I will add that these sights have dimmed, green front & rear bar included, -much- faster than the Meprolights on my Glocks have. However, this is somewhat offset by the fact that on the PTs, the bright white circle around the tritium vial shows up better in daylight than the circle on the Mepros do.
    I would not take the shorter life-span as such a bad mark against the PTs as some might, since when new they were easily brighter than my Mepros, & tritium sights by nature are an expendable asset IMHO.
    Bottom line, if you like the bar-dot setup, & if they still make em (the website is much less informative/flashy than it was years ago, how does THAT happen?!), you need to decide if the "candle burning brighter for shorter" is the way to go for you or not. YMMV.
    My Pts are pretty unusable in low-light ATM, & I am seriously considering going for something like http://www.xssights.com/ (here's an interview on Gun Talk with Dave Biggers of XS... http://traffic.libsyn.com/guntalk/100718guntalkC.mp3 ), but would love a bit more angle in the rear notch, & perhaps even a bar or dot in the "v", similar to the "Straight Eight" by Heini, but "v" notched like XS or Millett.
    BTW, PLZ get rid of the OEM plastic sights if your still on em, even if you end up with same configuration. You ever scrub that sight against a hard object , especially the front, & it will all of a sudden be shorter! (It's not hard to do if you actually train with it) :P

    Good luck, let me know if that helps, & what you end up with.
    calam

    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ
    Last edited by calam; September 2nd, 2010 at 10:55 PM. Reason: OEM Rears...

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
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    I have the sights. I shoot better with 3 dot.
    Glock 19
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  8. #7
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    OP, I like the stock Glock sights also but hate the white color. I used a very fine tip paint brush and a $4 bottle of DayGlo-Orange model paint (and a steady hand) to paint over the white dot and "U."

    Contrary to all the night-sight lovers out there, I don't find them any more effective than Dayglo-Orange paint. Most come with the white outlines, which is the bigger part of the issues I have--white fades into the background too easily, the glow isn't bright enough to be useful in bright lighting.

    Yes, I've seen the "glow-in-the-dark photos of the various brands, and that's nice--but how about the non glow-in-the-dark target? I find the orange paint stands out fine in any lighting that allows me to still see the target.

    So you might give that a try and see how you like it. At worst you'll be out $4 for the paint and a couple of bucks for a fine tip brush. I touch up the sights about 1-2 times a year; the bottle od paint will outlast me.
    Retired USAF E-8. Remember: You're being watched!
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    +1 to what OldVet said. Here's a good link to a DIY bright front sight - http://pistol-training.com/articles/...ty-front-sight

    A good link about 2 dot sights - http://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=14951


    The key to FAST shooting is a wide rear notch that does not draw your attention (black or subdued yellow dot with no outline, preferably single) and a front sight that draws your attention. For me, that's a Warren Tactical U notch rear cut at .150 and a white outline tritium front at .125. This gives you a lot of light on each side for speed, but still allows accuracy. I don't care who you are, but there's about a 95% chance that if you give single dot or two dot set-ups (or fiber optic, plain black, etc.) you will shoot faster than you will with a three dot set up. There is no valid reason for the rear sight to be as bright and stand out as much or more than your front sight. Front sight - press... not rear sight, front sight - press.

    Understand that i'm not saying my choice is best for everyone, but it's pretty well proven that three dot sights are slower than others, especially if you give the other options a chance. Many put too much importance on the rear sight, especially at closer ranges. At 7 yard and in, they aren't need very much if at all, except for confirmation. AR shooters that use iron sights will have a good understanding of how to use the rear sight. Obviously it's a little different situation, but it's used in a similar manner. The front sight is what's important and the only sight we should be focusing on.

    Here's something I wrote on another forum that seemed to really help the OP out with sights. He was trying to understand the Straight 8 two dot set up and wasn't sure it was for him since he was used to the three dot. Three dot sights are fine, but can be much slower than other options and also are not meant for lining up the dots, you level the top of the sights. In some instances, this will alter accuracy a good bit in a negative way.

    Here's a good explanation - http://pistol-training.com/archives/1361

    Some manufacturers have a 6 o'clock hold and other have a hold over (or combat hold, maybe?) Anyway, with almost all iron pistol sights, you line up the top of the front sight with the top of the rear sight. The dots are there to aid in acquiring the sights in low light or for faster follow-up shots and transitions along with it being faster to get your sight picture.

    Now, for the Straight 8's, I have them on one of my Nighthawks and my VBOB. I much prefer them at speed over the 3 dot configuration and prefer a single dot front over both. It all depends on how we shoot here. For me, I shoot fast from the draw and fire a few rounds as fast as possible then transition to another target, fast. So, a plain or single dot rear sight draws my attention to the front sight considerably faster than a 3 dot configuration. Also, I prefer a U notch about .150 with a .125 front for speed. Of course, the fiber optic with a plain rear is extremely fast as well. You have to figure that most of the top shooters that are fast use plain rears with a plain or fiber optic front. Not all, of course, but most. Personally, I still have trouble with all black sights.

    If I'm shooting slow and for accuracy, I'd prefer all black or a single dot configuration with a .125 rear squared notch and a .125 front sight. Three dots are fine here too, but you have to remember that you're lining up the tops of the sights (whether a 6 o'clock hold or holding over the target) and not the dots. I have a few guns with 3 dot Novak's that do not line up when the tops are even.

    I just put some Warren Tactical 2 dots on my M&P9 and TruGlo's TFO front on my Gen 4 17 with their 2 dot on the rear due to not being able to find a plain rear that works with their front. I just wanted to try them since two of my Sigs have their TFO (tritium and fiber optic) front with tritium rears. I'm changing that out to a plain 10-8 .140 rear with a Warren tritium .125 front. My 1911's all have Novak's or Heinie's, but soon they'll all have 10-8 plain rears with tritium front, except for my Nighthawk PDP Commander, which will have the Heinie QWIK .154 rear with a single dot and a tritium front with a white outline.

    Now, for just about anyone out there who TRAINS AND BECOMES PROFICIENT with both the three dot and two dot set up, will most like find that the two dot or single dot with a wider rear U notch are faster for follow up shots and target acquisition. There is nothing on the rear sight to slightly distract your vision. A small single yellow dot or a plain rear will allow the front sight to be much more obvious. A U notched rear will also allow this....it has something to do with the only 90 angles being at the tops or and the front sight.

    Iif you shoot a three dot setup for years then just give a two dot set up a 2 mag try, then of course the three dot will be faster for you. You can become proficient with just about anything, but sometimes certain things just allow you to do it quicker and to a higher degree. The only way to know is to give it a fair chance, and by that I mean shoot it as your primary sights for an extended period of time like 6 months or more. THEN, and only then, will you know they are definitely not faster. I hated them at first, then forced myself to use them. Once I understood their purpose (SPEED, and you may slightly sacrifice accuracy) and gave them a fair chance, I saw m,y times improve. I shoot three different types of sights every couple days. Soon, they'll all be two or single dot sights, no more three dot sights.

    * At night, you need to remember there's a good gap between the two tritium dots. If you don't train regularly with them, it's easy to try to get them as close to each other as possible. I've done it many times!

    Keep in mind that the wider the rear and if it's a U notch, this will also aid in speed. These things together are very fast. Even if so-and-so is faster with three dot sights, that doesn't change the fact that single and two dot sights, especially in a wide U notch are just plain faster. I was faster with three dot sights when I first tried two dot sights. Then I understood that I was to completely leave the rear dot out of the sight picture (unless it was pitch black out) and I became MUCH faster. It's very hard to do that, for me, with the three dot sights.
    Here are my preferred sights along with a pic of the front sight from the DIY article I linked above. I like the two dot for my carry, but am starting to lean towards single dot for pretty much everything. I just wish i could run the TFO front sight I have on my Glock with the 10-8 or Warren rear and not the stupid two dot tritium rear from TruGlo that I have on there and blacked out for now. Maybe I'll inquire on a custom cut from Warren.

    There's a reason you see mostly black rear sights in competition - and even when there's a night shoot.



    Last edited by jonconsiglio; September 3rd, 2010 at 02:28 PM.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  10. #9
    Member Array Glock23MI's Avatar
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    My 23 came with night sights installed. Got a hell of a deal on them too. Wasn't necessarily looking for them when i bought the gun, but he was out of stock 23's so i took the 1 with them already on it.
    I shoot fine with the 3-dot setup and i really like how the night sights allow me to see the gun in pitch black darkness w/out a probem. With some time at the range, i'm sure you could shoot just as
    well as you did with the stock sights.

  11. #10
    Member Array Dsimon11's Avatar
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    Thank you so much to everyone for all of the good feedback! Great and informative advice especially from OldVet and Joncon. I am still not sold on the 3 dot night sights obviously.

    OldVet, could you post a pic of the stock sights with the DayGlo paint on them? Where can you order the paint from? and can the sights really be seen well in almost complete darkness like you said?

    I think I may try to get the best of both worlds and paint the rear U sight orange and install a front night sight and use the orange tape method on it. Still not quite sure. The pics were very explanatory Joncon, thank you.

  12. #11
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    I think you're on the right track, but there's no reason to paint the rear sight. Leaving it black or with a subdued single dot will be much faster for you that a screaming bright rear pulling your eye in. it might not be a big deal when lining up the sight, but it very well may be when you're tracking the sight during recoil and it's bouncing around. That will pull your eye all over the place in many cases, of course not all, and slow you down and affect your accuracy.

    Give it a good try with a black rear sight. For now, if you're using three dot sights, go to the range and rip through a couple mags as fast as you can and still be accurate enough to hold an 8" group at 7 yards. Then, black out the rear dots with a marker, paint or tape, whatever, and run the same drill again. Don't just unload, but use a target with a few circles on it and transition. Work your reset and fire strings of three, four, five, seventeen, whatever, and see how you do. Just be sure to repeat the same thing with both configurations and be very sure to focus AND TRACK the front sight during recoil. This should show you a lot for free. You'll get it all figured out!
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  13. #12
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    Let me clarify my comments. The paint does not glow in the dark, although there are some luminescent paints that do. What I'm saying is if there's enough light to illuminate the target (a dimly lit room, a street-lighted parking lot, etc.), the dayglo paint I use shows up well. If it's "pitch-black"; no, they don't show up, nor does the target--even if you have brightly glowing nightsights.

    There is a brand of gunsight paint available that is carried by several online catalogs, but it's pricey for a tiny bottle. I picked up some paint from a hobby store (model airplanes, cars, etc.) for $3.99. Mine is "Model Master" acrylic, but testors makes it also, although it's not quite as bright. It comes in a bunch of really bright colors, more than you can imagine. You can mix and match the colors for front and rear sights, depending on if you want the front to stand out from the rear. I'm lazy, went with all orange.

    Another option is nail polish from Walgreens or the like. Again, a lot of bright colors available. They seem to work best if applied over a base coat of white. They also run about $4, so it's still no big investment to try. If you're good with blue tape and an Exacto knife (or razor), you can do a top notch job. I used a very fine artist brush (craft store item) and a stiff drink to settle the hands, and it came out okay.

    I don't have a camera that takes closeups well, so a picture wouldn't show much. I'll experiment and see what i can come up with.

    In the end, if you don't like them research the nightsights and find one that you do. Nothing lost except a few bucks and the time it took to paint them.
    Retired USAF E-8. Remember: You're being watched!
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  14. #13
    Senior Member Array boatail's Avatar
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    Stock Glock sights are fine in daylight, but gone at night. I prefer the 3 dot night sights myself, but to each their own. Maybe you can get a big dot front night sight and leave the stock rears alone. At night, the front night sight will be enough.
    Light travels faster than sound...thats why some people appear bright before they speak

  15. #14
    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    I wouldn't waste my time on the glow paint, just the vibrant paint OldVet mentioned. Tape holds very well too if done right and may last a bit longer than paint, depending on your sight. if it's a smooth front sight and you want to paint it, I'd suggest some 400 grit sand paper or lower, paint it, then use a sealer or clear nail polish.

    I have those photoluminescence sights on a few of my HK's. A slpit second flash from the Surefire will get them glowing like crazy. I can see how nice they could be in countries where tritium is not allowed, but I don't find much use for them. I may try replacing the rear on one of them and leaving that type on the front, just to see since they're pretty bright outdoors, but just to see, not actually carry that way.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

  16. #15
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    Some pictures

    Here are some pictures of glow-on enhanced gun sights,
    How does it compare with anything else? It doesn't, is like comparing apples to pears truly. different technologies have overlaps in performance but they differ at some point.

    Please let me try to explain, most people I've talked to compare it with tritium, well tritium is different, it glows perennially and it comes in different configurations, aside of their size ( you cannot make a real big dot ), another limitation is you cannot make them brighter, for the previous reasons they always have a white or brightly colored dot or shape around them.

    Glow-on s phosphorescent is light activated, yes, but due to its density it needs very little attention at all.
    and if we are talking about size, if you cover an 1/8" dot on your front sight, you've already covered about 10 times the size of a tritium capsule, (this are facts, not exaggerations ),
    Phosphorescent pigments luminescence dims down, however it will glow all night glow, just remember is "glow in the dark" not "glow when i turn the light on "

    I had some glow in the dark paint and the glow didn't last!
    New material brought to the market recently are far more efficient , plus they are not radioactive.

    Which technology is best?
    Is a personal choice, thee are not perfect solutions, just adequate ones.

    But, is it visible during the day?
    Glow-on has a special reflective material added to make sure of that.

    Do I need to paint a white base before I apply it?
    Not at all, it is all you'll need.

    Are you trying to make me buy it?
    No not at this point, just trying to answer questions posted to me by other posters, quite frankly if someone is sold to one technology or product, there is no point, they try to bash a product no matter what, plus they are going to apply that technology to everything in reach, just like us.

    How does it compare to similar phosphorescent products?
    Some leo friends and I have checked the factory phosphorescent sights of their glocks against glow-on, and it wasn't to hard to convince them to apply the stuff over their sights. (Maybe the fact that they are my friends helped a little)Some one stated "is really awesome to go from an outside location into a basement or such and have those sights glow like they are electric lights and if it need be a small flashlight will bring them to life, dramatically brighter than tritium in a case of an emergency".
    We've purchased about every competitors product which glows in the dark, for comparison purposes, we exposed them to heat, cold water, blood, oil, etc. and of course we checked if they glowed in the dark.
    Just let me say we checked. For now we are pretty confident we are in a good place.

    I won't mention brands but you guys can figure it out yourselves, just check what you get with your dollar, or how far the buck goes.

    Why should I go with glow-on, of all things?
    A single vial comes with some glow-on self adhesive which is very good for custom rear sights, (we love the U shaped rear sights, we just think they should hug the notch completely to have a tight front dot over target).

    So one vial ($13.31 s&h included) is good for at least 20 guns, if you use a lot it comes to mere 67 cents of a dollar per gun ( pistol, rifle shotgun etc.), so we wouldn't consider it pricey.

    So because the low price we would be getting a cheap stuff?
    I wouldn't call it cheap, because is a good product, as we speak we have testers over lake Erie ( yes fishing is one of the uses ), and the first reports are " go with the glow " here a link of one of our testers, so we know deep cold water won't damage it and it'll get us lunch too.

    Enough said. here some pics.
    first notice the difference between front sight with glow-on and the rear sights white dots

    Here a keltec pf9 with added custom u shaped rear sight



    Where can we check it out?
    On the first page of this forum on the right column is our add, "Glow-on, night sight pigment", please check it out.

    You all have a wonderful Labor day, 'till next time

    Gatopardo, live long, live free

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