trigger jobs

This is a discussion on trigger jobs within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by OldVet If the trigger doesn't get stuck and the gun goes bang when the trigger is pulled, I'm a happy camper. I ...

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Thread: trigger jobs

  1. #16
    Ex Member Array slave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    If the trigger doesn't get stuck and the gun goes bang when the trigger is pulled, I'm a happy camper. I guess my finger just isn't sensitive to differences in pull. I can tell one's different from another but so is driving my Chevy truck versus the wife's Explorer. They're different too, but both get me where I'm going. Either I'm too dumb (No comments requested) to know the difference between a good trigger and a bad one, or I haven't been spoiled by a trigger job that costs more than the gun.

    Time to duck and cover, I guess.
    Makes two of us LOL!

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  3. #17
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    I put Wolff springs in two of my revolvers, 442 and SP101. This was after shooting them quite a bit. They were "smooth" but heavy. Now they are smooth and not as heavy. No issues with light strikes as of yet. I kept the factory springs in case I ever want to put them back stock. I've had no issues with any of my semi-auto triggers.
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  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
    Glock is actually a few bucks cheaper then the M&P's and come with a trigger with no grit. I don't think it's a price point thing, I think it's just a flaw in the trigger.
    Glock's trigger are not gritty, but they are not great either. They are just average.
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  5. #19
    Senior Member Array Ring's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slave View Post
    Wait, I have been shooting for 20 years, and put hundreds of thousands of rounds down range. I have shot a PPK, 1911's, shot guns, grenade launchers, assault rifles, machine guns, AT4's, SAWs, 22's, etc...

    What is this mysterious grit people speak of?

    Also, really? 98% of factory triggers are crap? 98% I highly doubt that 98% of factory triggers are crap. Why would anyone buy a product where 98% of the units have a bad part that makes the product work.
    some people cant tell the difference between cheese wiz and 10 year old aged chedder

  6. #20
    Ex Member Array slave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ring View Post
    some people cant tell the difference between cheese wiz and 10 year old aged chedder
    We're not talking cheese wiz, we are speaking about triggers!

  7. #21
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    Definition of a Gritty Trigger......or Answer to: "What Is This Mysterious Grit That People Speak Of?"

    The "Gritty" feeling in a trigger is usually caused by one or more areas of rough machining or "machine chatter marks" or a rough investment casting area on one or more of the trigger component parts/surfaces.

    That "grit" is felt at some point during the progression of the trigger pull as imperfect metal contact surfaces abrade while sliding past or over one another.

    It can be incredibly irritating especially when attempting to take carefully aimed or precision shots.

    Many times a firearm trigger WILL smooth itself out after repeated use as rougher contact areas eventually wear themselves away or (at least) smoother.

    Sometimes the feel of a lousy trigger pull will not ever "fix" itself.

    Dry firing a firearm 6,000 times is not really the ideal solution to a terrible trigger.

    Hence the need or desire for a trigger job.

    While (of course) it's possible for a shooter to get used to a poor, gritty, inconsistent trigger - all shooters will shoot any firearm better when that firearm has a good, crisp, clean breaking and consistent trigger with little or smooth pre-travel and no over-travel.

    It IS possible for absolutely identical firearms coming right off the production line to have widely varying trigger pulls.

    One may sport a "perfect" trigger - another may have a mushy feeling trigger with an inconsistent let off and yet another will feel horribly gritty because the cause of a poor trigger can be as slight as a couple of minute machine chatter marks or one trigger pin hole that is misaligned.

    Some firearms can have absolutely flawless trigger components but. one of those parts could be contacting a bad area on the trigger housing or receiver which could cause a feeling of "grit" OR cause the trigger not to reset exactly the same way shot to shot.

    At one time (in the past) a rough area of a sear would be carefully hand honed during assembly and small burs would be discovered during assembly and rectified but, it's usually all about "cranking them out" as quickly as possible these days in order to meet demand...so often such things are ignored or intentionally overlooked as long as the firearm functions.

    The vast majority of firearms these days are not assembled by skilled gunsmiths. They are just basically assembled like Tinker Toys.

  8. #22
    New Member Array Navyguns45's Avatar
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    A lot of new guns do come with less than desirable triggers however, they do work.

  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ring View Post
    some people cant tell the difference between cheese wiz and 10 year old aged chedder
    One comes in a can. I'm trying to remember which one.
    Retired USAF E-8. Avatar is OldVet from days long gone. Oh, to be young again.
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  10. #24
    Ex Member Array slave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    Definition of a Gritty Trigger......or Answer to: "What Is This Mysterious Grit That People Speak Of?"

    The "Gritty" feeling in a trigger is usually caused by one or more areas of rough machining or "machine chatter marks" or a rough investment casting area on one or more of the trigger component parts/surfaces.

    That "grit" is felt at some point during the progression of the trigger pull as imperfect metal contact surfaces abrade while sliding past or over one another.

    It can be incredibly irritating especially when attempting to take carefully aimed or precision shots.

    Many times a firearm trigger WILL smooth itself out after repeated use as rougher contact areas eventually wear themselves away or (at least) smoother.

    Sometimes the feel of a lousy trigger pull will not ever "fix" itself.

    Dry firing a firearm 6,000 times is not really the ideal solution to a terrible trigger.

    Hence the need or desire for a trigger job.

    While (of course) it's possible for a shooter to get used to a poor, gritty, inconsistent trigger - all shooters will shoot any firearm better when that firearm has a good, crisp, clean breaking and consistent trigger with little or smooth pre-travel and no over-travel.

    It IS possible for absolutely identical firearms coming right off the production line to have widely varying trigger pulls.

    One may sport a "perfect" trigger - another may have a mushy feeling trigger with an inconsistent let off and yet another will feel horribly gritty because the cause of a poor trigger can be as slight as a couple of minute machine chatter marks or one trigger pin hole that is misaligned.

    Some firearms can have absolutely flawless trigger components but. one of those parts could be contacting a bad area on the trigger housing or receiver which could cause a feeling of "grit" OR cause the trigger not to reset exactly the same way shot to shot.

    At one time (in the past) a rough area of a sear would be carefully hand honed during assembly and small burs would be discovered during assembly and rectified but, it's usually all about "cranking them out" as quickly as possible these days in order to meet demand...so often such things are ignored or intentionally overlooked as long as the firearm functions.

    The vast majority of firearms these days are not assembled by skilled gunsmiths. They are just basically assembled like Tinker Toys.
    AH! Ok. Well, I am a combat shooter. I don't practice precision shots with a pistol. I use them for close combat. I took precision shots with sniper rifles, and with assault rifles.

    20 years of shooting, I guess I never noticed.

    I did call a buddy of mine, he spent 23 years in the Army. He was a Ranger, Special Forces, Special Operations, trained in Israel, Germany, the UK. He is a veteran of quite a few combats, and was a sniper, as well as the Israeli bodygaurd training.

    He has never, ever gotten a trigger job on any weapon he used, nor any of his personally owned weapons.

  11. #25
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    Seems very simple, if you want one (trigger job), get one, if you don't, don't.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

  12. #26
    Distinguished Member Array AutoFan's Avatar
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    slave, if you and your buddy don't notice how bad or good the triggers are on your guns, good for you. If you and your buddy have shot sniper rifles, then you both have had used guns with trigger jobs. The reality is that most of the old military surplus guns I own have better triggers than the new guns I've seen for sale, which is sad.

    It really isn't any different from buying a car with sloppy steering and handling. It will work, but it isn't as fun and it is more work for the driver.

  13. #27
    Ex Member Array JOHNSMITH's Avatar
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    Indeed... and some people can't notice/don't care about the difference between, say, a Toyota Avalon and a Corvette Z06. But some do. It's all based on what your preferences are.

  14. #28
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    It's a simple fact that most production guns today have very little or NO hand fitting/polishing done to them.

    Cleaning the gunk out of the mechanism and polishing the internals ( except for hardened sear surfaces ) will usually improve a trigger.

    Hand cycling and dry firing (if safe for the gun ) will also smooth things up.
    This is all I need for Defensive guns.

    Guns used for Competition shooting are different - do whatever / spend whatever you want.

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