Mistakes when purchasing a defensive handgun - Page 5

Mistakes when purchasing a defensive handgun

This is a discussion on Mistakes when purchasing a defensive handgun within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Purchasing something that you haven't shot before, and having others tell you what you should buy. Cheers....

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Thread: Mistakes when purchasing a defensive handgun

  1. #61
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    Purchasing something that you haven't shot before, and having others tell you what you should buy.

    Cheers.
    One Riot, One Ranger. Long live the Republic of Texas.

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  2. #62
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    I don't think I posted here earlier, and maybe don't really have all that much to add. The reason there are so many guns on the market is because there are so many people with different needs and wants. Its not all that different from buying cars, scuba gear, kayaks, or anything where 1 size is NOT going to fit all. With cars, vehicles, as soon as you buy the small sporty one you find you need a truck. With kayaks, as soon as you buy a touring kayak, you want to get into river kayaking.

    So, figure out what your really need it for and want it for. No one size fits all in this decision. HD v carry need to be factored in. Concealed carry in different weather conditions v open carry if allowed where you are located, needs to be factored in. Hand size and wrist strength all count. Then too, you need to look at ammo cost. Are you willing to pay extra for .45 or .380 v 9. Some of that depends on how much you really will practice v how much you might think you are going to practice.

    I own 3 very different guns and could easily talk myself into buying 3 - 5 more if money weren't a factor. That is because there is no single gun or caliber that does it all.

  3. #63
    Senior Member Array KoriBustard's Avatar
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    I'm starting to get the sense that buying your first handgun is like asking "If you could only play golf with one club, what would it be?" Thanks again for all the comments.

  4. #64
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    The biggest mistake you can make is not buying a S&W M&P, Glock 1st-3rd Gen, or XD. All three of those are a no brainer and you will eventually own one of them sooner or later.

    *Note the order.....
    Ccccccc what? Ccccccccccc Hawks!

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by C hawk Glock View Post
    The biggest mistake you can make is not buying a S&W M&P, Glock 1st-3rd Gen, or XD. All three of those are a no brainer and you will eventually own one of them sooner or later.
    *Note the order.....
    This advise IS a mistake..., sorry!
    A person buying a hand gun, mostly for defense should NEVER take the advise of any nameless person.. (Me included).
    Handle any gun your self and try it out. (I do not like any of the above suggestions due to they all have heavy checkering on their grips that hurt my hands... I have had surgery).

    But, you can take some of the information on the net with a grain of salt. Sometimes there is good information,,,,

    Lateck,

  6. #66
    Senior Member Array mr surveyor's Avatar
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    7 iron


  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateck View Post
    This advise IS a mistake..., sorry!
    A person buying a hand gun, mostly for defense should NEVER take the advise of any nameless person.. (Me included).
    Handle any gun your self and try it out. (I do not like any of the above suggestions due to they all have heavy checkering on their grips that hurt my hands... I have had surgery).

    But, you can take some of the information on the net with a grain of salt. Sometimes there is good information,,,,

    Lateck,
    With all do respect, you don't know what you don't know....... You initial choice PPS is a Glock (single stack clone). Why would you pick a defensive gun with limited capacity? You said defensive not CC or deep concealment in which a PPS is more suited for. I would have agreed a bit more of your defensive choice if it were a revolver with smooth grips.

    With regards to your grip statement, I totally disagree with you as M&P's/Glock's (Glock's RTF does not qualify) nor XD's have real heavy checkering. Let's also keep in mind that Polymer is easily changed. Now lets get back to real barriers like dependability, and capacity which are typically main factors for choosing defensive firearm.

    Just look at the PPS and those grips, are you saying they are that much softer then the others I have mentioned? LOL

    http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/w...04&isFirearm=Y
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  8. #68
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    If you plan on making this a concealed carry gun, you need to put it in a holster and carry it. You may love the gun, but if its too big and cant be easily concealed then all that initial glory will go by the wayside. Some guns are difficult to carry due to body shape, size, etc., so if that is your intention you need to get a feel for it, or get used to feeling uncomfortable and drawing unnecessary attention to yourself each time you carry by constantly readjusting.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skippys View Post
    Mistakes cost money (don't ask me how I know that). Try to look ahead before you pony up the pesos.

    1: What are you defending? Around the home? Perhaps a 12 gauge and a handgun. Revolver? Semi-auto? Factor the cost of ammo and the range/practice time to get --and stay -- proficient. Where and how do you store the firearm(s)? Who else should know where they are and how to use it/them? What might the duplex neighbors think if a bullet or shotgun slug passed through a shared wall?

    2: Concealed carry? Take the classes first; use a variety of handguns your local range has to offer. Ask people you trust about why and how they came up with their setup. Take some time to decide what you shoot best.

    3: Don't buy crap handguns and holsters. Do your homework. Experiment with small quantities of ammo (50-100 rounds), when you find the defensive/practice rounds that work for you, stick with it. Lord knows how many half-empty boxes of trendy, pricey, internet-hyped ammo many of us have on hand (don't ask me how I know).

    And that's just the financial side of things......
    Ditto Ditto Ditto I know too, have 1/2 box ammo and a few never worn holsters filling up a drawer.....

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    I think the biggest mistake anyone could ever make is not buying a G19 right away. :)
    I agree I am sure that was a typo it should read G 22 (haha)

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by KoriBustard View Post
    I'm starting to get the sense that buying your first handgun is like asking "If you could only play golf with one club, what would it be?" Thanks again for all the comments.
    that I can do .... if I had to go with one it would be my Ping Eye 7 iron most reliable club in the bag...................

  12. #72
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    Getting too caught up in the caliber wars. 40 v 9mm v 45. They all have their proponents, and you will hear many internet commandos extol the virtues of one over the other. Truth be told with modern bonded JHP ammo in an appropriate weight for the caliber these service rounds are all within 100 fpe of each other and perform similarly in penetration tests. You need to realize that rifles and shotguns are far better performers from a ballistics and accuracy point of view. That said, pistols are defensive in nature, because we don't necessarily know we're going to be in a gunfight that day.
    Keeping the preceding in mind, a 9mm is probably the best round for a beginner. Decent performance (with proper ammo), light recoil, and probably the easiest to find in a bewildering array of loadings. Although if you decided to go with a 40 or a 45 or even a 357 Sig you certainly wouldn't be underarmed.

    Good Luck!
    Si vis pacem, parabellum

  13. #73
    Senior Member Array KoriBustard's Avatar
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    With all the good advice I've gotten in hand, I'm going to a gun show on Sunday with three pistols in mind. Walther PPS, Ruger SR9c, and S&W MP9 compact. I'll let you know which baby gets delivered :)

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiboxer View Post
    Getting too caught up in the caliber wars. 40 v 9mm v 45. They all have their proponents, and you will hear many internet commandos extol the virtues of one over the other. Truth be told with modern bonded JHP ammo in an appropriate weight for the caliber these service rounds are all within 100 fpe of each other and perform similarly in penetration tests. You need to realize that rifles and shotguns are far better performers from a ballistics and accuracy point of view. That said, pistols are defensive in nature, because we don't necessarily know we're going to be in a gunfight that day.
    Keeping the preceding in mind, a 9mm is probably the best round for a beginner. Decent performance (with proper ammo), light recoil, and probably the easiest to find in a bewildering array of loadings. Although if you decided to go with a 40 or a 45 or even a 357 Sig you certainly wouldn't be underarmed.

    Good Luck!
    Probably one of the best reasonings I have ever read. Hats off to you

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by C hawk Glock View Post
    The biggest mistake you can make is not buying a S&W M&P, Glock 1st-3rd Gen, or XD. All three of those are a no brainer and you will eventually own one of them sooner or later.

    *Note the order.....
    That's funny.
    I don't have any of those, and I'm not feeling the loss.

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