Youtube Video: Guy shoot himself on leg while drawing from holster

This is a discussion on Youtube Video: Guy shoot himself on leg while drawing from holster within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; This is one reason I only CCW a DAO pistol. This guy is on a certain level of poor mechanics but the best is that ...

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Thread: Youtube Video: Guy shoot himself on leg while drawing from holster

  1. #61
    Member Array bpang1's Avatar
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    This is one reason I only CCW a DAO pistol.

    This guy is on a certain level of poor mechanics but the best is that one older fellow that seems to pick up guns and flip them or something like a pitcher picking up a ball to throw...can't remember who it was but immediately turned off the video I was watching of him review some newer pocket pistol like the Micro DE or LCP.

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  3. #62
    Ex Member Array G19inLV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIGguy229 View Post


    Seriously? You need different trigger discipline with a Serpa than with a regular holster? YHGTBSM. What is difficult about keeping your finger off the trigger when drawing?
    The Serpa forces you to put your finger over the trigger when drawing, instead of above it, AND with pressure towards the trigger. Curious, you ever use a Serpa?

  4. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by G19inLV View Post
    The Serpa forces you to put your finger over the trigger when drawing, instead of above it, AND with pressure towards the trigger. Curious, you ever use a Serpa?
    Yes. See post #41

    Again...the holster does not have advertised mind control features--it cannot force you to do anything. Like any other piece of equipment, it requires training and discipline. If the finger is on the trigger during the draw, it's because the shooter wants it there....not because the holster "made him/her do it".
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  5. #64
    Ex Member Array Yankeejib's Avatar
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    Given the dumb gun **** people post on the YouTube, I can't believe we don't have numerous self-inflicted gunshot wounds to look at. Maybe everyone else was a little embarrassed and took their bullet hole videos down.

  6. #65
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    It is amazing how some of you are attacking the guy for his admitted screw up. His whole intent was to possibly show someone else what not to do and that was rather upstanding of him to do so. As to the holsters and guns. I have an XD with a thumb release style holster and I have a SERPA that I use for my CZ75B so I know the two different styles. The first thing to keep in mind is that his two pistols operate totally different. In his case the Glock is a striker fired pistol in which you have to engage the trigger to move to the firing position and then exert enough pressure to break the sear. With the thumb release holster the motion is the same as any draw in that you keep your trigger finger straight and hope that your thumb hits the release properly (training). If you don't the gun does not move, it stays locked in place and you try to pull your pants up. The SERPA uses a trigger finger sweep of the locking mechanism to release and unlike what many of you are saying my finger always ends up on the slide. It does not end up on the trigger at all. Now back to the guns and his mistake. I can see where if he had done an extensive amount of practice with the thumb release that day and did not clear his head that he may have swept his thumb on the safety of the 1911. Due to the 1911 having a straight back push to operate the trigger rather than an arc and with most 1911 pistols in the 4 pound range on their triggers (if not modified?), it is easy to see in his hurried attempt to try and get the pistol out of the holster that the trigger was engaged. His proper response when he encountered the resistance should have been to keep the trigger finger away from the gun, allowed the gun to be re-holstered and then taken a deep breath, checked his equipment (safety) and tried again. He didn't, the safety had been kicked off with his draw stroke, his finger engaged the 1911 trigger and he went to the hospital. Was the fact that the camera filming away caused him to feel the need to hurry? Only he can tell us that. Lesson - be familiar with the manual of arms for the weapon system that you are carrying (gun and holster). Practice extensively with an unloaded pistol with that system. If changing the system allow enough time to adapt to the new system with an unloaded pistol to gain proficiency before going hot. It still boils down to the ultimate safety, the brain.
    TSiWRX, OD* and Rightwing like this.

  7. #66
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    He is very lucky. Lessons learned...
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  8. #67
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by claude clay View Post
    TSi....for a professed beginner, you are a right thinker. these skills should serve you well as you and guns go through life.
    Thank you. Coming from a long-time trainer, I appreciate that encouragement!

    i take from him---never move faster than you can stop.

    its an old lesson, bears repeating though.
    DEFINITELY.

    One thing that I learned from *all* of my teachers was that firearms are not toys, and when you're out on that range, as fun as it is, it's -NOT- a game. Think something is wrong? *stop*. Yes, as my proficiency increases, so will my expectations - and abilities - for rectifying "speed bumps" improve, but for the time being, I'm still on the "slow is smooth" side of the fence, and not even paying mind to the other half of that equation. I'll get there, eventually, but that will come after hours and hours...and more hours...of practice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Haystacker View Post
    TSIWRX - I am impressed with your evaluation of the video. I agree with your conclusions 100%. Thanks for posting.
    Again, I'm thankful for the encouragement from more experienced members. But I must say that I did not catch this all by myself. On the Ohioans for Concealed Carry Forums, during the initial discussion, I had believed this incident to be completely a case of muscle-confusion/gear-confusion - it was not until a *much* more experienced member who posted his observations about the trigger-finger slip-in that I decided to take things "frame by frame," and it was at that point that I was able to cross-validate that member's opinion, that the shooter's finger had entered the trigger guard way too early.


    -----


    FWIW, I don't think that the shooter is an idiot.

    I do think that he needs more attentive practice, but then again, I know I definitely do, and I'd bet that even those of you who are highly skilled in your craft - professionals or hobbyists - also think that you do, too. In many professions, we call what we do our "practice." That's to acknowledge the fact that we're continuing to learn, continuing to strive towards perfection or mastery...which, ironically, we know that we will never truly be able to reach, as there's always that next rung to be climbed.

    I am thankful that this particular shooter was not hurt more than he was, and what's more, I'm thankful that he took the time, even in his obviously less-than-comfortable state, to post-up what had happened, and to share it without editing or obfuscation of the facts.

    In this way, we may all learn, and I think that particularly for newbies like me, it just may save someone a limb, or a life.

  9. #68
    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Armydad View Post
    Practice extensively with an unloaded pistol with that system. If changing the system allow enough time to adapt to the new system with an unloaded pistol to gain proficiency before going hot..
    I also practice drawing with replica BB guns. Same weight and feel as the real thing with blowback slides, etc, and you can even fire off a shot at a target to see how accurate you were. I believe they also make replica airsoft guns which are even less dangerous.

    I also occasionally practice drawing and firing my real guns by using snap-caps instead of live ammo. I still point them at a safe place just in case I somehow screwed up and put live ammo in them, so far that has never happened though. Unfortunately, this only simulates the first shot, because with the lack of a recoil and loud noise, it is hard to say how well or quickly you could take that next shot.

  10. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    I also practice drawing with replica BB guns. Same weight and feel as the real thing with blowback slides, etc, and you can even fire off a shot at a target to see how accurate you were. I believe they also make replica airsoft guns which are even less dangerous.

    I also occasionally practice drawing and firing my real guns by using snap-caps instead of live ammo. I still point them at a safe place just in case I somehow screwed up and put live ammo in them, so far that has never happened though. Unfortunately, this only simulates the first shot, because with the lack of a recoil and loud noise, it is hard to say how well or quickly you could take that next shot.
    Find your local IDPA club, and you can find out (and have a lot of fun doing it).

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  11. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by ranburr View Post
    This guy is an absolute idiot. I like the part where he says his training kicked in. Some how I don't think this guy has any training beyond watching G.I. Joe cartoons.
    I feel sorry for the dude and all, but I kinda laughed out loud when I was watching the video and he said that too.... To myself I was thinking "that's when my training kicked in" Huh? I have never trained to get shot. I've tried to prepare myself for such an event in the event it happened, medical kit close and all, but that's about it. It looks like his training consisted of letting a few choice cuss words fly at a high level of tone and with vigor/pain behind um.

    The guy reminds me of the fella that blew a hole in his foot with his 1911 .... Unbelievable.

    The guy in this video is so lucky he wasn't shooting JHP, that's all I can say.
    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." Luke 22:36

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  12. #71
    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    There has to be a Kimber joke in there somewhere... just kidding

  13. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haystacker View Post
    One thing I picked up on - He said he had been practicing with THAT holster and his Glock. Then he changed over to his 1911. This reinforces my belief to stay with one platform for Defensive Carry. I do appreciate this guy posting. It does make me think.
    I think this is the main issue here. The two holsters he was using require different muscle memory motions. The fist one requires a thumb press in an area that is simular to the Kimber's safety location, and the second one requires a trigger finger press in an area that is simular to the trigger. Sounds like this holster is a bad idea no matter how you look at it. In my opinion he attempted this extreme fat draw, and when he realized the gun did not release, his muscle memory cycled through the motions to release both his holsters, first disengaging the Kimber safety, and then in "Hurry up mode" he dragged the trigger finger to the side release and continued to try pressing the release even as the gun was clearing the holster.

    I suggest he settle on a single holster design, preferably one that does not use a trigger finger squeeze.

  14. #73
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    Very, very lucky guy. Lesson learned for all.

    I hope he has a speedy recovery.
    What we've got here is failure to communicate.

  15. #74
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    he owns up ( he admits with a but-if and anything following that starts to sound like a back-door excuse) to making a mistake

    which has little to do with equipment or how much or how different they are. it has everything to do with moving faster than he can stop and

    keeping the finger off the trigger till....but we all know that rule,

    paramedic--says it best with there is the potential to have an ND

    not all shooter will have one. those that have 1 will not have 2.
    anyone has 2 should sell their guns: seriously.
    an ND during testing does not count: like a decocker on a CZ-52 or a stuck firing pin on a mil-serp;
    these are under controlled conditions.

    as for filling in dead air--he could have edited it. that he left it in rather goes to him meaning it and he loses me there.
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  16. #75
    Member Array BubbaDX's Avatar
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    One thing I notice in the video that I have not seen discussed yet is what he does with his pistol after shooting himself. Instead of holstering it, he lays it on the ground. Is this a correct response and is that firearm now to be considered unsecured? I believe he should have holstered the pistol.

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