Revolver Cylinder Chamfering?

This is a discussion on Revolver Cylinder Chamfering? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hi Guys, I've enjoyed this forum quite a bit, just joined to be able to post a question! I've got an SW 340MP that works ...

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Thread: Revolver Cylinder Chamfering?

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    Member Array Zoomba's Avatar
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    Revolver Cylinder Chamfering?

    Hi Guys,

    I've enjoyed this forum quite a bit, just joined to be able to post a question!

    I've got an SW 340MP that works like a clock, but has super sharp edges on the extractor and sides of the chambers of the cylinder. I am wanting to ease reloading, as the cases hang up on the edge something fierce when using speed strips.

    Is there anything particularly uncommon about using a 45 degree chamfer cutter hand held (Jammed into a hole in a dowel) that is unpiloted, to take off a fuzz?

    I'm trying to figure out what is gained by a piloted cutter that costs $110, and $100 for each size guide there-after.

    Thanks for the thoughts.

    Zach
    Zoomba: Shooting Topics
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    Is there anything particularly uncommon about using a 45 degree chamfer cutter hand held (Jammed into a hole in a dowel) that is unpiloted, to take off a fuzz?
    No. Shouldnt be a big deal really. Go slow and take your time.
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    Member Array KimBobTex's Avatar
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    Whenever I have chamfering going on with any of my cylinders, I use either baby powder or Gold Bond powder ... Doc sez it's about the only remedy he can recommend. Both work equally well.
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    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    Like Hot Guns stated, go slow and take your time.
    This is what I used, $30.
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    VIP Member Array Rollo's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum! I echo what the others have said. Go SLOW. You can always take more off but you can't put it back on.
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    For that price you could have a professional do it for you. Check with Mark Hartshorne @ Pinnacle-Guns.com: Pinnacle High Performance Custom Gunsmithing, he'll fix you up.

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    Member Array Zoomba's Avatar
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    Thanks guys!

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    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    if you do not feel comfortable removing the cylinder from the frame--go with a gun smith.


    just breaking the edges is often sufficient; with a tool like Gauntes posted.
    true 'cutting' may be for a gun intended to be used in matches like IDPA.
    or more extras from the $$ Custom Shop.
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    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    Another thing relative to chamfering and the need for it is the factory ammo that you use and its potential effect on speed loading. The crimp on the factory ammo can have an effect on this. My experience has been that BB, Winchester STHP, and Speer GD have sufficient crimp that the case edge rarely hangs up on the cylinder edge. Federal is not quite as good and Remington GS is the worst, with a significant case edge protruding that is subject to more hangups. YMMV
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    Senior Member Array JohnLeVick's Avatar
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    Be especially cautious on the extractor. When a chamfer job is done properly, the extractor is removed, the charge holes in the cylinder are chamfered, and then, the corners of the extractor star points are beveled to blend them in with the chamfer on the chamber mouths. Little or no material is removed from the radii of the extractor. If all you do is break the sharp edge, though, you'll be fine. Too much off the extractor can cause it to jump a case rim during extraction, though that is less likely on a snubbie with its short extractor rod.
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    I love owning and shooting revolvers but don't know a thing about chamfering the charge holes. Do report back to us on this project.
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    You sound like you are pretty up on machine & tools.

    I grind a three sided file down to a point AKA grind/tapering all three sides evenly to make a file-hard 3 corner scraper.

    Use a flat dressed grinding wheel or a belt sander to make the scraper.

    Since all you really want to do is break the sharp edge - the three cornered scraper works flawlessly.

    Practice breaking the inside edge of a few pieces of steel tubing. You'll get the hang of it very quickly...then have at it. It does a very clean and neat job.

    You just hold the scraper at the correct angle and go 'round each hole and then do the sharp edges of the extractor next.

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    Member Array Zoomba's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips about the ammunition selection guys, and cutting depths.

    I'm planning to take off just enough to have a stripe of bare metal show with the cutter on both the cylinder and extractor .010 or .020 wide.

    Ammunition. I practice with Winchester .38+P 125 gr JHP, and carry Winchester .38+P JHP Bonded 130gr. They feel identical going down range, but the 130gr doesn't make near the punch of a 158... but my follow up shots aren't much to speak of with the 158's. The bonded hang up with a speed strip, just as much as the white box stuff.

    I am looking to find some 158gr .38spl +P's that have similar recoil to the carry loads, as I try to practice with the same load/brand as what I carry... but the 158 grain stuff I've found is darn near 30 bucks a box of 50 for practice grade stuff. Out of the 340, I'm not sure my wife would practice with them.

    Any suggestions?

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    Senior Member Array JohnLeVick's Avatar
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    If you want a chamfer as wide as .020", you are talking about more than you probably want to do with a scraper or an un-piloted cutter. Brownell's sells a single-caliber chamfer cutter with a pilot for $100 retail, $66.55 dealer. It sounds like a lot, but if you plan on owning other .38s or .357s, you'll want to do the same thing with them. You may have friends who need a chamfer job done, too. The tool will last practically forever if you use it correctly, so if you amortize that $100 over a half dozen guns or so, it isn't much. The only other things you need are screwdrivers that fit the sideplate screws properly and some cutting fluid. I like Tap Magic, which smells like cinnamon and cleans up easily. Brownell's Do-Drill is good, but doesn't come in cans smaller than 16oz. and is goopy and messy to clean up. I wound up buying a kit with pilots for .38, 9mm, .44 and .45 cylinders, as well as pilots for recrowning muzzles in those handgun calibers and .224, .243, and .308 rifle muzzles. I've done so many, my own and for other people, the per-job cost of the cutters and pilots is next to nothing.

    If you are 100% sure that you'll never do more than one chamfer job, Brownell's also sells a deburring tool that can be used if one is careful. It comes with a handle for about $40, and is available in 3/8" and 1/2" diameters. Part numbers are 080-623-000 for the 1/2" and 080-623-001 for the 3/8". I've used mine on several Colt cylinders, since Colt extractor assemblies don't come apart as easily as Smiths. It's a little clumsier to use and slower than the piloted cutters, but satisfactory if used carefully.
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    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    Any suggestions?

    learn to re-load

    you seem to be menhanically inclined and 38 ( next to 45acp) is the easiest to make.

    set up for one caliber with you & the wife shooting even 100 a week..payback....
    minus re sale value (50%) would need $300 to $350 to start so call it 200/savings per 100 is 15, call it 12.50 and you need to shoot
    7 or 8 months to get your adjusted cost back.
    thats with a lee 4 hole turret and making 175 rounds per hour.
    making what ever power loads you like is a goodness also.

    course you have to factor in what your time is worth also.
    some making $400 an hour need not apply. but the most of us who
    would like to shoot more, can if we re-load.
    Be aware, be deliberate in your actions and be accurate.
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