Stopping power statistics...

Stopping power statistics...

This is a discussion on Stopping power statistics... within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've read on more than one gun website that the stopping power percentage of a .32 is around 50%, whereas the stopping power of a ...

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    New Member Array ktburns's Avatar
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    Stopping power statistics...

    I've read on more than one gun website that the stopping power percentage of a .32 is around 50%, whereas the stopping power of a .380 is around 70%. Does anyone know where these statistics originated? The reason for the question is I bought my wife a Titanium Beretta Tomcat .32 (there were only 1500 made) a few years ago. Now I want to sell it to buy her a .380. What say you, forum dwellers??


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    I know that a torso hit from a .32 is infinitely more effective than a miss from a .380. Numbers are just numbers friend and only hits count. Tell your wife to keep shooting until they fall down.

    If she likes the .32 and shoots it well then she should keep it.
    I haven’t heard any of the journalists who volunteered to be waterboarded asking to have their fingernails wrenched out with pliers, or electrodes attached to their genitals.

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    Senior Member Array Danimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    I know that a torso hit from a .32 is infinitely more effective than a miss from a .380. Numbers are just numbers friend and only hits count. Tell your wife to keep shooting until they fall down.

    If she likes the .32 and shoots it well then she should keep it.
    I concur. And if there were only 1500 made, then I would def. keep it.

    Just save your allowance up for a few months and get her that grizzly killing .380 you are lusting over.

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    When it comes to the stopping power of any given caliber, there will always be too many variables to obtain conclusive results. Age, weight, stature, physical and mental state, along with type of attire, will always play a part in the end result.

    With that said, a bullet to the CNS, regardless of caliber, will immediately neutralize the recipient. As will a good swing of a 2X4 to the head or knees.
    What we've got here is failure to communicate.

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    Stopping power should not be a topic of discussion regarding any handgun caliber. The reason is, all handguns suck! Handguns have weak stopping power regardless of caliber. The technological advances of today's ammo has narrowed the gap in stopping power so much, that they all perform so closely, it doesn't seem to matter as much, what caliber you choose. What's going to stop someone is the fact that you have a gun, you're willing to use it (and project that a intensity to your attacker) and you can hit where you aim (gun control.) Whether it's a .45acp or a .32, it has to hit a vital area to even have a chance to stop a determined attacker. When discussing caliber, I would suggest that you consider other some other things like:

    1. Can you afford to buy a lot of that ammo and pratice with it?
    2. Can you shoot the gun accurately and quickly with that caliber?
    3. Can your gun hold a lot of ammo in that caliber? (preferrably more than 5 or 6 rounds.)
    4. Can you reload that caliber effectively and cost effectively?

    I would suggest the above 4 criteria, rather than stopping power.

    Shoot straight and shoot safe.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktburns View Post
    I've read on more than one gun website that the stopping power percentage of a .32 is around 50%, whereas the stopping power of a .380 is around 70%. Does anyone know where these statistics originated? The reason for the question is I bought my wife a Titanium Beretta Tomcat .32 (there were only 1500 made) a few years ago. Now I want to sell it to buy her a .380. What say you, forum dwellers??
    One think that you have to consider is that statistics can fool you. The .380 ACP round is a lot more popular than the .32 ACP. With that in mind and remember that all the shooting incidents weren't performed by the same person at the same individual under the same circumstances, you can come up with all kinds of numbers. More people have probably been shot with a .380 than a .32 so more people have probably been stopped with the .380 ACP. I'd keep the Beretta because of its rarity, but if I were moving up in caliber, I would go 9 mm or larger.

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    There is no magic caliber.

    That being said, my EDCs are a 357 magnum AND a 40.

    Personally I will not carry anything smaller than a 9mm+p or a 38+p. I just do not trust anything smaller to get the job done.

    If you look around long enough you will find a persuasive argument for any caliber. I want a caliber that will penetrate at least 12" through ballistic gel. The FBI has done a lot of testing & I will take their word for it... If you think another testing medium is more suited to your carry choices I encourage you to follow it. I am not the authority on the subject, just a follower of one school of thought...
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    Reliability should be another serious consideration for a SD gun.
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    Member Array HandgunWorld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xeero View Post
    Reliability should be another serious consideration for a SD gun.
    Very true, forgot about that. If the OP want's that gun as a collectible, great. And as long as it's reliable and he can say yes to the above 4 criteria, it's good to go, but caliber doesn't matter much.
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    Senior Member Array GlockJS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HandgunWorld View Post
    Stopping power should not be a topic of discussion regarding any handgun caliber. The reason is, all handguns suck! Handguns have weak stopping power regardless of caliber. The technological advances of today's ammo has narrowed the gap in stopping power so much, that they all perform so closely, it doesn't seem to matter as much, what caliber you choose. What's going to stop someone is the fact that you have a gun, you're willing to use it (and project that a intensity to your attacker) and you can hit where you aim (gun control.) Whether it's a .45acp or a .32, it has to hit a vital area to even have a chance to stop a determined attacker. When discussing caliber, I would suggest that you consider other some other things like:

    1. Can you afford to buy a lot of that ammo and pratice with it?
    2. Can you shoot the gun accurately and quickly with that caliber?
    3. Can your gun hold a lot of ammo in that caliber? (preferrably more than 5 or 6 rounds.)
    4. Can you reload that caliber effectively and cost effectively?

    I would suggest the above 4 criteria, rather than stopping power.

    Shoot straight and shoot safe.
    So am I reading this correctly to the point that you would not suggest any type of J frame revolver? Because criteria 3 would snub them(pardon the pun )
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    I have been reading a concealed carry book by Massad Ayoob. One of the points he makes repeatedly in the book is that a .38 j-frame makes a fine backup gun. It is also infinitely better than none at all and depending on your wardrobe may be your best or even only carry option. Like any other, there is no right or wrong answer here and a snub .38 does have its purpose and place.

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    A 32 is lethal with a good hit, just like any other bullet; but, it's ability to quickly incapicitate a violent person questionable.
    Larger more powerful calibers are more likely to cause an immediate reaction, possibly stopping agressive action before the intended victim is hurt or killed.
    If the attackers agressive actions are not quickly stopped by a well placed shot(s) then it defeats the purpose.
    Does the 32 have decisive stopping ability? Supposedly about 1/2 the time. Is that good enough for you / wife?
    No internal lock or magazine disconnect on my pistols!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ktburns View Post
    I've read on more than one gun website that the stopping power percentage of a .32 is around 50%, whereas the stopping power of a .380 is around 70%. Does anyone know where these statistics originated? The reason for the question is I bought my wife a Titanium Beretta Tomcat .32 (there were only 1500 made) a few years ago. Now I want to sell it to buy her a .380. What say you, forum dwellers??
    I think they contacted 100 people shot by each caliber... 50 replied in the 32 group and only 30 in the 380 group!


    I carry the P32 and chose it over the 380... one more round, i carry fmj in both anyway to get all the pentration possible, the speed, weight and power difference is slight, the recoil is a lot less IMO... mine is primarily my secondary gun and it is a more up close gun, good at 5yds, 7 yds ok at at 10 but the size and sight radius of pocket pistols make distances beyond more of a challenge, any of them take practice...
    "The greatest pride is to think you are humnble enough." CS Lewis

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    Bigger is always better because you can't fight sir Isaac Newton. Larger projectile = more energy. I am a firm believer a .380 isn't a great "woman" caliber that everyone always thinks it is. I too am guilty of wanting to get my wife a .380 cause they are small. But if I have trouble holding on to some of these little pistols in .380 with large hands and mechanic's forearms, how is my smaller, dainty wife going to? No sir, she will carry a officer model .45 or EMP in 9mm. Both offer much less felt recoil IMO than most small .380's.

    I carry a .45 because I believe you should carry the largest caliber you can, I do so to ensure if I ever do have to fire on a human, they go down fast. How much more so my wife?

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