Weapon lights on Carry pistols/Home defense pistol - Page 2

Weapon lights on Carry pistols/Home defense pistol

This is a discussion on Weapon lights on Carry pistols/Home defense pistol within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; In my little corner of the world... A light is a light... and a firearm is a firearm. Two different tools with two different functions. ...

View Poll Results: Who here has a weapon light on their carry/home defense pistol?

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  • Carry pistol W/light

    15 8.62%
  • Home defense pistol W/light

    84 48.28%
  • No light

    85 48.85%
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Thread: Weapon lights on Carry pistols/Home defense pistol

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Secret Spuk's Avatar
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    In my little corner of the world...

    A light is a light... and a firearm is a firearm. Two different tools with two different functions. A light is to illuminate the dark. See where you couldnt see before. A firearm is to make a person or people stop what they are doing that cause you enough alarm that you may fear for your life. Or the lives of those you love.

    Now... Like most of us... I dont really want to shoot anyone. In fact I'd avoid it if at all possible. Even more that I dont want to shoot anyone... I dont want anyone to shoot me.

    The thing with lights on your gun is this... with the light you can see the adversary... That can be good. At the same time he/she can see you. Thats usually bad. Again I dont want to shoot anyone... So I usually wont go looking for trouble with or without a flashlight. I'm not in any way suggesting that anyone not use a flashlight. There are plenty of techniques to slave a light to the firearm. I'm just not in favor of mounting one to the firearm.

    Then there's the whole control's confusion thing. Under stress I could see someome letting go a round when their intent is to flash the flashlight.

    But thats just my take on the whole thing.


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  2. #17
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    I have a flashlight and I have guns. Not all the guns have rails, but the flashlight works equally well with them all. Also, as has been previously pointed out, I can point the gun and light independently and not assault people I don't feel are threatening me.
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  3. #18
    Senior Member Array canav844's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZJD1968 View Post
    Along with the other examples of why not to carry a light, I would like to give another reason that I voted no light. A light gives away your position to everyone and tells them where you are looking and pointing. In my opinion nobody needs to know that. In the case of multiple BGs that turns from a bad idea to a REALLY bad idea.

    As for my home at night, I do leave nightlights so it is not so dark that I can't identify my targets, therefore not needing a light.
    Momentary switch. I've also found that momentary switch on a strobe light, lets me get the "pie slices" of a room I am familiar with, that while moving, makes it very hard for anyone getting hit with the light to pin point me. Again, bursts of light and movement are key to disorienting others while keeping my bearings. Just because I use a flashlight, doesn't mean it's a beacon to myself, if I'm using it properly and not just walking around with it on all the time. This is why "tactical flashlights" have made momentary tail caps so popular, though Ayoob does give some traditional side button flashlight techniques in "Stressfire"

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  4. #19
    Senior Member Array TonyDTrigger's Avatar
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    I do, any gun dedicated to home defense has a light attached.

    Some of these lights are so bright that any BG looking at it will be temporarely blinded, giving you an advantage. Also, these attached lights If you don't feel like it might be a good idea to use it during a particular situation, just don't turn it on.

  5. #20
    VIP Member Array Secret Spuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyDTrigger View Post
    I do, any gun dedicated to home defense has a light attached.

    Some of these lights are so bright that any BG looking at it will be temporarely blinded, giving you an advantage. Also, these attached lights If you don't feel like it might be a good idea to use it during a particular situation, just don't turn it on.
    Oh really? are you sure?... Willing to bet your life on it?

  6. #21
    VIP Member Array Secret Spuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canav844 View Post
    Momentary switch. I've also found that momentary switch on a strobe light, lets me get the "pie slices" of a room I am familiar with, that while moving, makes it very hard for anyone getting hit with the light to pin point me. Again, bursts of light and movement are key to disorienting others while keeping my bearings. Just because I use a flashlight, doesn't mean it's a beacon to myself, if I'm using it properly and not just walking around with it on all the time. This is why "tactical flashlights" have made momentary tail caps so popular, though Ayoob does give some traditional side button flashlight techniques in "Stressfire"
    Could someone please explain this technique of slicing the pie? I keep hearing about it. Dont get it.

  7. #22
    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    No light mounted on my weapon...My preference.
    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

  8. #23
    VIP Member Array Sheldon J's Avatar
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    Had one for years... Went from a M6X to a TLR 2S the name of the game is to blind an adversary giving one the tactical edge.....

    Just remember strobe and move...
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  9. #24
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    One thing to keep in mind, whether the light is mounted or not, light blindness will not affect the trigger finger, only the vision.
    crabbys44 likes this.
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  10. #25
    Senior Member Array canav844's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Secret Spuk View Post
    Could someone please explain this technique of slicing the pie? I keep hearing about it. Dont get it.
    It's best explained with visuals, and it applies to (light or dark) movement in a structure where there might be a threat. Think of a standard door way as having a 180 degree field of view, and a person having a roughly 45 degree or so useful field of view, if you walk right through a door you expose yourself to all of the room on the other side of the door, but before you worry about tunnel vision you're still going to miss more than half of the details of the room, so if someone is waiting in ambush you may very well miss them and get shot. "Slicing the pie" is slowly leaning to your side exposing minimal amounts of your self to see and clear slices of the field of view before you enter into the room, so you can engage the threat before entering the bottleneck door way. There is much more detail and thought to be given to it, and introducing a light adds to complexity, but hopefully that's enough to when combine with the clip of it in this video, do give you a basic idea
    ‪PDTV Season V Show 2‬‏ - YouTube

    And here's one describing the technique, yet shows the firearm pointing into the unknown darkness where there's yet to be any ID friend, foe or empty.
    ‪PDTV Show 3 Teaser‬‏ - YouTube

    Note, these are ads on short 10 minute clips, not at all a full depiction of the methods.

    Also, apart from shooting one handed with the FBI technique, if non-mounted flashlight is your only option, then you're fighting to co-align the light with the gun if you need to shoot to illuminate your target, one more reason I'm a fan of having both on and off gun options. And a mounted flashlight is friendly to a more traditional shooting grip. I practice flashlight holding methods at the range, but it's not as easy to be accurate as it is with a standard full two handed grip on the gun, and trying to aim the light and line up the sights takes a fair bit practice.

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  11. #26
    Distinguished Member Array AZJD1968's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crabbys44 View Post
    How well do your nightlights work when there is no power? No electricity, no lights, no target identification.

    Why does it have to be all or nothing? I have both weapon-mounted lights and handhelds. What will you do when you only have one hand to manipulate your light and gun? Realistically, you will need to open a door, you are pushing the wife or kids to cover, or you are holding the baby in your off hand, what are you going to do? Use a lanyard? So your light is now swinging around on your wrist and you are in the dark, now what?

    As far as keeping a light in your off hand versus weapon-mounted, how much difference will it REALLY make masking your position? It's not as if you are turning the light on and leaving it on as you stumble around the house, is it? Light on, look, light off, move.

    Archer, Blade Tech, for one, will make you a holster for just about any combo you can think of. Like a pre-rail G-21 with a mounted Surefire P101? Last I looked, Tex Shoemaker will make a one off holster if you provide the specs.

    Shockwave, you are absolutely correct that a light can be a weapon in and of itself. I've had people drop everything and fall on the ground with a flash in the eyes of a good light. In the field I had a weapon mounted light, a rechargeable Surefire or Stinger for every day or night use, and a lithium Surefire on my belt in case the rechargeable died. Both lights together weigh a lot less than a Mag-light.

    I'm not flaming, really. The most likely scenario most of us will face is a power outage. My mom was without power intermittently for over 2 weeks when a windstorm knocked out some of the main power feeds, in fact the entire county was experiencing the same thing. There was a commotion in my yard after dark, my shotgun light allowed me to ID if it was my dog or a coyote (turned out it was a 'dillo my dog wanted to eat). Same thing happened to my wife when I wasn't home and she used my 686 without a light and tried to shoot a coyote killing one of our puppies by starlight. She missed, it ran away, and the puppy died.

    Reality and training should be your guide, not some mall ninja spouting wisdom from the 70's.
    Dude, the OP asked for our thoughts on a mounted light and I gave mine. I dont really care why you are so anal about them.

    Flashlights do have a purpose.... be carefull how and when you use them, or not...... I don't care.

    3 more words for ya, nightlights with batteries..... It's not rocket science.
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  12. #27
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    Surefire X200 on my Glock 23, with a Surefire E1L right next to it. If you choose to have a WML you need to have a handheld light also. The handheld is to search and clear, your home the WML is to identify the target. I practice drills frequently. You searc with the handheld in your weak hand gun at the low ready in your strong hand. You then drop the handheld as you bring up the gun and activate the WML with a two handed grip of your gun and identifying your threat.
    Foo909 likes this.
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  13. #28
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    I've said it probably a hundred times here... A WML is not a replacement to a flashlight. They are two different tools for different task. Do not confuse one for the other. The arguments about lighting up your family members or giving the BG's a target to shoot at are just plain old dumb. Learn to use the equipment correctly, and these arguments are eliminated.
    jwhite75, Doodle, TSiWRX and 1 others like this.
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  14. #29
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    Sixto... I completely agree with you and couldn't have said it better...

    To the OP, The TLR-1 is a great light, I have 2... Spend an extra few bucks and get the TLR-1S. It has the strobe function which can completely disorient the BG. Your handheld light should also have a strobe function...

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  15. #30
    Senior Member Array Texag's Avatar
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    Most of the misconceptions about weapons lights (give you away, force you to point gun at everything you illuminate, etc) have been addressed, but I wanted to touch on this:

    Quote Originally Posted by Secret Spuk View Post
    Oh really? are you sure?... Willing to bet your life on it?
    I know I'm not the guy you quoted, but no, I'm not betting my life on my light cowing an intruder, that's why it's attached to a gun.
    I collect ammo, not guns.

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