Dry Firing

This is a discussion on Dry Firing within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by tclance Have read quite a bit about dry firing for practice. Is it necessary to have one of those snap caps or ...

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Thread: Dry Firing

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array Guns and more's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tclance View Post
    Have read quite a bit about dry firing for practice. Is it necessary to have one of those snap caps or
    will it damage the pistol if one is not used?
    TC
    I consider snap caps cheap insurance. I keep them in all my guns, and give the guns some exercise often.
    You get to rack the slide, fill the magazine, all the fun stuff.

    BTW, a while back someone recommended "weighted dummy rounds", instead of snap caps. So I bought some.
    First they are way overpriced. Second, they had no insert in the primer pocket so they are worthless as snap caps.
    I guess they have a place, but not for me.

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  3. #17
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    I avoid dry firing, period. I don't fidget with my guns. I learned "keep your finger off the trigger unless you are intentionally shooting something." It stuck with me now for over 30 years. If I want to shoot, I go shoot. Otherwise, all my carry guns stay loaded and in the safe or in a holster on my person or in my direct control. I do not load, unload, unchamber, etc. They don't clear the holster for any reason other than to go shooting or go back in their box in the safe. My philosophy on this is the less you mess with it the more you reduce your odds of something stupid happening. Call me old fashioned.
    Saber and wmhawth like this.
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  4. #18
    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    I avoid dry firing, period. I don't fidget with my guns. I learned "keep your finger off the trigger unless you are intentionally shooting something." It stuck with me now for over 30 years. If I want to shoot, I go shoot. Otherwise, all my carry guns stay loaded and in the safe or in a holster on my person or in my direct control. I do not load, unload, unchamber, etc. They don't clear the holster for any reason other than to go shooting or go back in their box in the safe. My philosophy on this is the less you mess with it the more you reduce your odds of something stupid happening. Call me old fashioned.
    Not old fashioned, just very rigid on a very critical safety rule.

    Any type of practice or drilling with a firearm that is not at a firing range should be done with the same rigid attention to safety. Always in the same room, NEVER any live ammunition in that room, triple check that the weapon is indeed unloaded before starting, if you are interrupted in your practice, then when you resume, start all over with the verification that the weapon is unloaded.

    I reload my own ammunition, I made up a dozen or so that have no powder or primer, and I filled the primer pocket with leather plugs from my holster fabrication - Black (I suppose that hot glue or silicone would work just as well).

    If I want the challenge, I take the dummy rounds and will dump out a couple boxes of live ammo into a container and stir them up and reload from there. I might go 3 or 4 magazines without a dummy, or I might get 3 in a row in one mag. I had a couple of brutal ones that had every other round as a dummy. Not wise during an IDPA match.
    Sticks

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  5. #19
    Member Array Wolfrage's Avatar
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    Depends on a number of things. For example when I called Ruger when I first got my 10/22, I asked if it was safe to dryfire, since I knew most rimfires shouldn't be. They said yes, it was safe and recommended for practice. But not all are like that. Ask the manufacturer -- but I like using snapcaps -- toss a couple randomly in a mag to simulate FTFs during practice.

  6. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    I avoid dry firing, period. I don't fidget with my guns. I learned "keep your finger off the trigger unless you are intentionally shooting something." It stuck with me now for over 30 years. If I want to shoot, I go shoot. Otherwise, all my carry guns stay loaded and in the safe or in a holster on my person or in my direct control. I do not load, unload, unchamber, etc. They don't clear the holster for any reason other than to go shooting or go back in their box in the safe. My philosophy on this is the less you mess with it the more you reduce your odds of something stupid happening. Call me old fashioned.
    I agree 100-percent and that is the safest approach. Captain 'Murphy' always seems to come around when you least expect it. In the 70's I learned this the hard way.
    Last edited by Saber; August 28th, 2011 at 12:33 PM.
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  7. #21
    Distinguished Member Array grouse's Avatar
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    Go with what the maker says in the manual.

    The only practice that has ever helped me is live fire.

    Pulling the trigger in the house creeps be out, and it totaly voids the "treat every firearm as if it were loaded" rule.
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  8. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by tclance View Post
    Its A Springfield 1911 A1
    When I was on an Army Pistol Team we dry fired our National Match 1911s all the time, almost daily, with no adverse effects that anyone (including the armorer) ever noticed.
    Rick

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  9. #23
    Senior Member Array ntkb's Avatar
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    1911 All day and every day for the rest of your life, no damage will result. Don’t know about Glocks but an XD will damage the roll pin in the slide, eventually it won’t fire. On rim fires as I understand it, it’s the firing pin hitting the edge of the chamber causing it get a dent in it. Older revolvers with a spur on the hammer should not be dry fired.

    Unless you are interested in better accuracy via trigger control then dry firing is unnecessary, you can shoot five inch groups at ten yards and think it is good.

  10. #24
    Senior Member Array Texag's Avatar
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    If you're not dry firing you're completely missing out on free practice that vastly improves sight picture and trigger control, and helps out with various manipulations.
    I collect ammo, not guns.

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