So I've never been a revolver guy but...

This is a discussion on So I've never been a revolver guy but... within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; As the title not so subtly implies I'm not much of a revolver guy. My first pistol was an 1860 army revolver (italian clone) and ...

Results 1 to 13 of 13
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By bmcgilvray
  • 1 Post By C hawk Glock

Thread: So I've never been a revolver guy but...

  1. #1
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tomball TX
    Posts
    948

    So I've never been a revolver guy but...

    As the title not so subtly implies I'm not much of a revolver guy. My first pistol was an 1860 army revolver (italian clone) and man black powder is fun. I also have an old 3 screw ruger single six .22 that is a family heirloom. Other than that no weelguns for me. Recently I put together a holster for a coworker.IMG_0338.JPG
    I kinda have the revolver bug. I've looked at the S&W website and I know their quality is fine but I don't like the looks of their revolvers. I want a 6" .44 and really like the Colt Anaconda. Thoughts?

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Senior Member Array Cold Shot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    875
    I like ruger revolvers.

  4. #3
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tomball TX
    Posts
    948
    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Shot View Post
    I like ruger revolvers.
    yeah but their .44's look wierd

  5. #4
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,403
    What model Smith & Wesson is hiding in that holster?

    I'm a fan of Smith & Wesson revolvers first and Colt second. Have you taken a look at older Smith & Wesson Model 29 and Model 629 .44 Magnum revolvers? They are so fine to own and shoot and a used one in good condition will still last a lifetime. With any sort of care it will retain a good measure of it's purchase price too or maybe even appreciate. I've enjoyed owning and using a Model 29 for 31 years now and it's been perfectly satisfactory for extended use with heavy handloads.

    The Colts are nice too and well respected among revolver aficionados. I've only shot an Anaconda .44 Magnum on one occasion, six shots through another fellow's Anaconda while on the firing line at a pistol range. It was nice though and soaked up recoil well.

    A great many folks love the Ruger double-action revolvers and swear by them. Only a personal opinion but I can't see the attraction in the Ruger guns. Their looks, their handling characteristics, and the feel of their actions leaves me cold.

    Take a look at them anyway because you might find you could come to love one.
    C hawk Glock likes this.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  6. #5
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tomball TX
    Posts
    948
    It's an old model 29 I think, (not my gun and it didn't have a model number on it oddly enough)

  7. #6
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,403
    Quote Originally Posted by Doodle View Post
    It's an old model 29 I think, (not my gun and it didn't have a model number on it oddly enough)
    Here you go, Doodle.

    If you are looking for the model number on a Smith & Wesson revolver just pop open the cylinder to see it on the inside of the frame. Smith & Wesson didn't mark the exterior surfaces of their revolvers with model numbers. Shown is a Smith & Wesson Model 27 .357 Magnum bearing the marking "MOD 27-2". The "-2" after the model number as seen here represents the product revision under which this revolver was manufactured. The dash number is scarcely important except for a very few models of revolvers and then only if one is a rabid S&W collector.


    If a model number doesn't appear at all in this locate then the revolver was manufactured prior to 1958, the year the numeric model numbers were first assigned to Smith & Wesson revolvers.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  8. #7
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tomball TX
    Posts
    948
    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Here you go, Doodle.

    If you are looking for the model number on a Smith & Wesson revolver just pop open the cylinder to see it on the inside of the frame. Smith & Wesson didn't mark the exterior surfaces of their revolvers with model numbers. Shown is a Smith & Wesson Model 27 .357 Magnum bearing the marking "MOD 27-2". The "-2" after the model number as seen here represents the product revision under which this revolver was manufactured. The dash number is scarcely important except for a very few models of revolvers and then only if one is a rabid S&W collector.


    If a model number doesn't appear at all in this locate then the revolver was manufactured prior to 1958, the year the numeric model numbers were first assigned to Smith & Wesson revolvers.
    Hah, learned something. Thank you very much

  9. #8
    VIP Member
    Array C hawk Glock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    W. Washington
    Posts
    3,542
    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    What model Smith & Wesson is hiding in that holster?

    I'm a fan of Smith & Wesson revolvers first and Colt second. Have you taken a look at older Smith & Wesson Model 29 and Model 629 .44 Magnum revolvers? They are so fine to own and shoot and a used one in good condition will still last a lifetime. With any sort of care it will retain a good measure of it's purchase price too or maybe even appreciate. I've enjoyed owning and using a Model 29 for 31 years now and it's been perfectly satisfactory for extended use with heavy handloads.

    The Colts are nice too and well respected among revolver aficionados. I've only shot an Anaconda .44 Magnum on one occasion, six shots through another fellow's Anaconda while on the firing line at a pistol range. It was nice though and soaked up recoil well.

    A great many folks love the Ruger double-action revolvers and swear by them. Only a personal opinion but I can't see the attraction in the Ruger guns. Their looks, their handling characteristics, and the feel of their actions leaves me cold.

    Take a look at them anyway because you might find you could come to love one.
    bmcgilvray,

    You are a brother from another mother! I feel the same way. Why have a Ruger when you can have a Smith or a Colt?

    BTW here is my S&W .44 and I think she is a real beaut Clark!

    model29.jpg
    bmcgilvray likes this.
    Ccccccc what? Ccccccccccc Hawks!

  10. #9
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tomball TX
    Posts
    948
    I think it is the straight line look from the top of the frame to the top of the barrel rib on the anaconda that I like but, once something becomes yours, you know how it is. You'll love it because of this and that but really because it's yours. I'm still open to S&W. Just need the extra money and one for a good price. Will be finished with in house training soon and hitting the field with new job. Petrolium indusrty field service pays well so I see lots of gun purchases in my future just don't tell the wife that!

  11. #10
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,403
    Makes me go weak in the knees to see that one, C Hawk Glock!

    Perfect general purpose barrel length, a handgun cartridge that can accomplish all that can reasonably be expected from a side arm, and all done up in shiny nickel. I've done gone and reverted to my childhood, again being attracted to the classic nickel models after years of holding them in contempt.
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  12. #11
    Moderator
    Array bmcgilvray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,403
    Let's see, Tomball, Texas? I get down that way every so often.

    We'll be certain not to tell...for a small fee, heh!
    “No possible rapidity of fire can atone for habitual carelessness of aim with the first shot.”

    Theodore Roosevelt, The Wilderness Hunter, 1893

  13. #12
    VIP Member
    Array C hawk Glock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    W. Washington
    Posts
    3,542
    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Makes me go weak in the knees to see that one, C Hawk Glock!

    Perfect general purpose barrel length, a handgun cartridge that can accomplish all that can reasonably be expected from a side arm, and all done up in shiny nickel. I've done gone and reverted to my childhood, again being attracted to the classic nickel models after years of holding them in contempt.
    I hear you on the nickel. I tend to prefer blued finishes over the years, but boy oh boy if you get a nice nickel finish they look almost too good to shoot.
    Ccccccc what? Ccccccccccc Hawks!

  14. #13
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tomball TX
    Posts
    948
    Quote Originally Posted by bmcgilvray View Post
    Let's see, Tomball, Texas? I get down that way every so often.

    We'll be certain not to tell...for a small fee, heh!
    At least a range trip if nothin else.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

3855 revolver pistol
,
3855 smith and wesson pistol
,
bought an old smith revolver looked forum
,
concealed carry black powder revolver
,
for years ive been a revolver guy
,
old mod.27-2 revolver
,

price of a used 629 44 magnum

,

smith and wesson 27-2

,
smith and wesson model 27 value
,

smith and wesson model 27-2 value

,
smith and wesson model 29 serial numbers
,

smith and wesson model 29 serial numbers date

,
smith wesson model 29 serial numbers
Click on a term to search for related topics.