Glocks

Glocks

This is a discussion on Glocks within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; SEALs, SAS, DHS, Coast Guard, NCIS, and other elite forces and agencies choose SIG. Why? Glock seems to be more popular than SIG with others, ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
Like Tree6Likes

Thread: Glocks

  1. #1
    New Member Array luvmesomesig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3

    Glocks

    SEALs, SAS, DHS, Coast Guard, NCIS, and other elite forces and agencies choose SIG. Why? Glock seems to be more popular than SIG with others, because of durability and reliability. If this were true, I don't understand why these "organizations" wouldn't choose the more durable and reliable of the two. I honestly like both weapons, but I would like to hear everyone else's opinion, as I'm sure others wonder the same thing.


  2. #2
    VIP Member
    Array nn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    7,123
    Trigger

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array Hiram25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wyoming, DE
    Posts
    11,264
    Welcome to the DC Forum from Delaware! Delaware State Police carry SIG, they look at the money, must be getting a deal on the SIG's?
    Hiram25
    You can educate ignorance, you can't fix stupid
    Retired DE Trooper, SA XD40 SC, S&W 2" Airweight
    dukalmighty & Pure Kustom Black Ops Pro "Trooper" Holsters, DE CCDW and LEOSA Permits, Vietnam Vet 68-69 Pleiku

  4. #4
    Member Array Bill Lindsay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    61
    Remember that equipment may have political issues attached. Remember the US wanted some bases in Italy. They said no. The US issued Berettas and if by magic, we got the bases. Also although issed does not mean carried, Some units have a ton of leway.

  5. #5
    VIP Member
    Array WHEC724's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    6,769
    Pure politics. Also one sets the standard for the other (For example, Coast Guard is way down the pecking order). I wouldn't be surprised if they standardized on Taurus.
    __________________________________
    'Clinging to my guns and religion

  6. #6
    New Member Array luvmesomesig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Hiram25 View Post
    Welcome to the DC Forum from Delaware! Delaware State Police carry SIG, they look at the money, must be getting a deal on the SIG's?
    This makes sense.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    9,499
    They are waiting on Chuck Taylor to conclude his Glock torture test. Last I heard he as around 300,000 rounds. They may have enough info to make a decision by 500,000 or so.
    AZ Hawk and joker1 like this.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

  8. #8
    VIP Member
    Array Mike1956's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Marion County, Ohio
    Posts
    11,858
    Quote Originally Posted by luvmesomesig View Post
    SEALs, SAS, DHS, Coast Guard, NCIS, and other elite forces and agencies choose SIG. Why? Glock seems to be more popular than SIG with others, because of durability and reliability. If this were true, I don't understand why these "organizations" wouldn't choose the more durable and reliable of the two. I honestly like both weapons, but I would like to hear everyone else's opinion, as I'm sure others wonder the same thing.
    Why do government agencies do many of the things they do?
    mwhartman likes this.

  9. #9
    New Member Array luvmesomesig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3
    Because they have the money to carelessly spend most likely

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    The Valley of the Sun, AZ
    Posts
    1,018
    It seems SIG is on the outs...

    U.S. GAO - B-402339.3, Sig Sauer, Inc., July 23, 2010

    "ATF, a principal law enforcement agency within the Department of Justice, seeks to replace its current metal-frame handguns with a new .40 caliber, polymer-frame handgun system.[1] This system consists of two handguns, which are issued to each ATF agent: a standard-size duty weapon for enforcement operations and a compact model for backup and auxiliary needs; the two models are in all other respects required to be identical in function and design. RFP, Statement of Work (SOW), at 22. The SOW stated detailed design and performance specifications, describing the exact features and performance characteristics required.

    At issue here is the live-fire testing by a cross-section of ATF agents, which was identified in the RFP as the most important among the four parts of the phase II testing, described above. RFP at 63. Under this test, 20 ATF agents with diverse skill levels, physical size, and right- or left-handedness were to evaluate each of the handguns that were submitted. Each agent evaluated the sample handguns first by firing 100 rounds of familiarity shooting, then twice firing 50 rounds for the pistol qualification course (PQC) test, and finally field stripping, cleaning and reassembling each type of handgun. For each handgun, the agent completed a questionnaire assigning adjectival ratings (excellent, very good, good, fair, or unsatisfactory) and providing narrative under the following categories: safety, reliability, accuracy, ergonomics and adaptability, suitability of size or weight, ease of cleaning and assembly, and overall assessment as a pistol for general issue to ATF agents.

    In addition to the agents' rating sheets, a record was kept of any stoppages or malfunctions that occurred during the live fire testing.[3] These records show that ATF's agents recorded 58 stoppages with Sig Sauer's full-size and compact pistols, 13 of which were considered to be gun-induced and 45 shooter-induced.[4] Id., Tab 2, Competitive Range Determination, at 3.[5] In contrast, the agents recorded a total of 16 shooter‑induced stoppages for Smith & Wesson's guns and 7 shooter-induced stoppages for Glock's guns. There were no gun-induced stoppages recorded for the Smith & Wesson or Glock guns. Id., Tab 8, Contracting Officer's Smith & Wesson Evaluation Summary, and Tab 9, Contracting Officer's Glock Evaluation Summary.

    The shooters' phase II evaluations of the offerors' handgun systems were provided to the agency's source selection board (SSB).[6] See Declaration of SSB Chair, Feb. 2, 2010, at 2. According to the SSB chair, "[i]t was determined that any weapon that displayed numerous gun-induced or shooter-induced malfunctions was not suitable for agents to depend on to protect their lives." Id. at 3. Based on the results of the shooting tests, the SSB recommended to the contracting officer that Sig Sauer's handgun be excluded from further consideration as unacceptable with respect to reliability. The contracting officer reviewed the SSB's consensus reports and agreed with the recommendation that Sig Sauer's proposal should be excluded from phase III, based upon the number of stoppages recorded for Sig Sauer's handguns. AR, B-402339.3, Tab 2, Competitive Range Determination, at 1."
    TonyDTrigger likes this.
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

    “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress and grows brave by reflection.” ― Thomas Paine

  11. #11
    VIP Member
    Array archer51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    22,360
    Welcome from Virginia.

    As others have said, it's money and politics. Who's willing to do what and for how much when procurement time comes around. There are several police departments that switched from Glock to the S&W M&P pistols because they got a good price and S&W supplied the holsters free of charge.
    Freedom doesn't come free. It is bought and paid for by the lives and blood of our men and women in uniform.

    USAF Retired
    NRA Life Member

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array wormy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,147
    Could it be the military requires second strike capability?
    Glock 22, 27 Gen 4
    Ruger SP101 .357mag
    S&W 637 Airweight
    Ruger Single Six
    Ruger Blackhawk Bisley 45 Colt
    Mossberg 835 Grand Slam

  13. #13
    Distinguished Member Array skysoldier29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Miami Florida / Michigan
    Posts
    1,261
    Money has a lot to do with it, but all those agencies are federal agencies which will get a huge discount. My last rotation to Afghanistan all the Seals I ran into "which were a lot" all carried Glocks. Military Special Operation Forces, we pretty much do what they want. Both platforms are outstanding in reliability and durability and its more just personal preference as to which one someone would want to carry. BTW you forgot the Secret Service, Army CID, Air Force OSI along with a bunch of other Federal Agencies that have SIGs on their authorized usage list.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array Inspector71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    982
    Lowest bidder!
    boricua likes this.
    If you can read this, thank a teacher. Because it's in English, thank a vet

  15. #15
    Distinguished Member Array skysoldier29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Miami Florida / Michigan
    Posts
    1,261
    Quote Originally Posted by wormy View Post
    Could it be the military requires second strike capability?

    I've never heard of that before but then again the military standard issued pistol is the M9 not a SIG. Curtain units such as criminal investigators and more so Special Forces can use what ever they want to for a side arm.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

do navy seals carry glocks

,

do navy seals use glocks

,

do seals carry glocks

,

do seals use glocks

,

glock navy seals

,

navy seal glock

,
navy seals and glocks
,

navy seals glock

,
navy seals glock 19
,
navy seals glocks
,
navy seals use glock
,
why seals dont use glocks
Click on a term to search for related topics.