Most Combat Accurate Sub-Compact Pistol

This is a discussion on Most Combat Accurate Sub-Compact Pistol within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am looking at getting a new 9mm concealment pistol this week and was looking at quite a few different guns. I am looking for ...

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Thread: Most Combat Accurate Sub-Compact Pistol

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array AdamSean's Avatar
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    Most Combat Accurate Sub-Compact Pistol

    I am looking at getting a new 9mm concealment pistol this week and was looking at quite a few different guns. I am looking for something concealable and as close to combat accurate as I can get. I have had great results from both Glock and Springfield XD, but I don't like the bulk of them or the weight of the XD in a sub-compact. I have seen a couple of videos of someone using the Ruger SR9c in IDPA rather well. I am kind of leaning more toward that for the size. If not the SR9c, I may go with a Glock 19, but was trying to avoid the mid-range sized pistols. What have some of you shot that gave you combat accurate hits?

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    VIP Member Array NY27's Avatar
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    The G19 would serve you well. But if you want something smaller, the G26 will do just about anything that the G19 can do.
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    Senior Member Array AdamSean's Avatar
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    I used to have a G26 years ago. The only other sub-compact to this day that gave it a run for its money was a Springfield XD9 SC. I used to whittle down broom sticks at 20 feet with the G26...lol.

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    Member Array Eaglebeak's Avatar
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    There's probably somebody here who's very proficient in both combat or target accuracy at nominal self-defense range with about every conceivable caliber, size, and type of handgun on the market. Unless you buy some sloppy, worn-out POS or an el-cheapo piece of new junk of questionable manufacturer, all reputable brand handguns have very respectable combat-range accuracy with respect to the weapon itself using reliable ammunition. From that point on, accuracy of the weapon is 90% dependent on the proficiency of the shooter and how well it fits in the shooter's hand(s).

    Consider a choice of handguns much like buying a pair of shoes or a new pair of underwear where finding the perfect size and fit are paramount over anything else. You can't run at your best in a pair of shoes that are a little too large or a little too small; and you can't perform your best with underwear that keep falling down from being too large or pose a permanent "weggie" from being too small.

    Don't be influenced by what the majority of people hype, love, or recommend because your best accuracy will be from whatever fits your hand most comfortably, is easiest to manage and operate without effort, and has a recoil that is easily tolerable without causing apprehensive anticipation of the shot that will unconsciously cause you to flinch or pull off target.

    Some hands love the more squared-off wide feel of a Glock, Sig, or Ruger SA grip while others prefer the more slim and/or and rounded feel of a revolver or Colt SA grip. Size, weight, and feel of the weapon are all factors to consider first before arguing about caliber or style. Lay them all out side-by-side, "try them on" by picking each one up, working the action, wallow them around to get the feel - then pick the one that simply fits and feels the best in your hand. Once you've got the best "fit", the rest of the target and combat accuracy will come with much, much practice.

    Try to remember that (regardless if it's a .380 or .45) a single, well-placed shot from a well-fitting, comfortable size handgun in the hand of a proficient shooter will do a lot more damage than a whole magazine (or cylinder) full of shots that miss the target because the handgun is either awkward in feel, too large or too small to make that "perfect fit" in the hand. And if you don't believe me, try picking your nose with somebody else's finger

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    Distinguished Member Array matthew03's Avatar
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    Flip a coin, pretty much anything from a reliable company will also be "combat accurate".

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    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eaglebeak View Post
    There's probably somebody here who's very proficient in both combat or target accuracy at nominal self-defense range with about every conceivable caliber, size, and type of handgun on the market. Unless you buy some sloppy, worn-out POS or an el-cheapo piece of new junk of questionable manufacturer, all reputable brand handguns have very respectable combat-range accuracy with respect to the weapon itself using reliable ammunition. From that point on, accuracy of the weapon is 90% dependent on the proficiency of the shooter and how well it fits in the shooter's hand(s).

    Consider a choice of handguns much like buying a pair of shoes or a new pair of underwear where finding the perfect size and fit are paramount over anything else. You can't run at your best in a pair of shoes that are a little too large or a little too small; and you can't perform your best with underwear that keep falling down from being too large or pose a permanent "weggie" from being too small.

    Don't be influenced by what the majority of people hype, love, or recommend because your best accuracy will be from whatever fits your hand most comfortably, is easiest to manage and operate without effort, and has a recoil that is easily tolerable without causing apprehensive anticipation of the shot that will unconsciously cause you to flinch or pull off target.

    Some hands love the more squared-off wide feel of a Glock, Sig, or Ruger SA grip while others prefer the more slim and/or and rounded feel of a revolver or Colt SA grip. Size, weight, and feel of the weapon are all factors to consider first before arguing about caliber or style. Lay them all out side-by-side, "try them on" by picking each one up, working the action, wallow them around to get the feel - then pick the one that simply fits and feels the best in your hand. Once you've got the best "fit", the rest of the target and combat accuracy will come with much, much practice.

    Try to remember that (regardless if it's a .380 or .45) a single, well-placed shot from a well-fitting, comfortable size handgun in the hand of a proficient shooter will do a lot more damage than a whole magazine (or cylinder) full of shots that miss the target because the handgun is either awkward in feel, too large or too small to make that "perfect fit" in the hand. And if you don't believe me, try picking your nose with somebody else's finger
    I've never understood the whole "comfortable in the hand" thing. As long as you can point it at the target and keep it there, what else do you need?

    The most important factors to me in a concealed carry gun in no particular order are (1) whether or not I can conceal it, (2) trigger pull/reset and (3) reliability.

    I can pick up pretty much any gun and make a good enough group with rapid twos, threes, fours, etc. to be considered "combat accurate" from 0-21 ft, i.e., SD range, and the "comfort and fit" of the grip has pretty much nothing to do with it.

    For example, my favorite gun ever in regards to ergonomics is the HK P30, but I don't carry it because the grip will scratch the hell out of you as it's basically like skateboard tape lite, and I don't like DA/SA triggers. I like one smooth, short, consistent trigger pull and a nice, short, tactile! trigger reset.

    Hell, do you think anyone carries a Glock for because it's "comfortable?"
    Mike1956 likes this.
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    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    I have to disagree a bit here.

    I've gone through three different pistols that I thought met my basic comfort and manipulation tests when fondling at the counter, and at the range, only to find that they were incompatible with my shooting grip when under slight stress/focusing on targets and moving while shooting them at my IDPA matches.

    FN -.40 - kept hitting the decocker during quick fire.

    XD -.40 - Slide release and take down levers dug into my thumbs...painfully after 4 shots (should have opted for the XDM) and I did not like the trigger pull or reset.

    Baby Eagle II polymer - .40 - Smaller opening in the trigger guard = for DA shot, tip of trigger digs into finger (have not given up on it yet).

    You truly won't know until you use them, not just shoot them.
    OD* likes this.
    Sticks

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    Senior Member Array AZ Hawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sticks View Post
    I have to disagree a bit here.

    I've gone through three different pistols that I thought met my basic comfort and manipulation tests when fondling at the counter, and at the range, only to find that they were incompatible with my shooting grip when under slight stress/focusing on targets and moving while shooting them at my IDPA matches.

    You truly won't know until you use them, not just shoot them.
    Who are you disagreeing with here?

    And, how is IDPA usage anything like usage in a SD scenario?
    Move. Shoot. Survive. ― The "Unofficial" Suarez International Doctrine

    “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress and grows brave by reflection.” ― Thomas Paine

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    Distinguished Member Array pirate's Avatar
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    More often than not acceptable "combat accuracy" is because of the shooter not the gun.
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    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Hawk View Post
    ...And, how is IDPA usage anything like usage in a SD scenario?
    IDPA/USPSA or any other shooting sport is as close as you are going to get short of going out looking to force a situation in a bad part of town.

    Shot timer, people watching (better shooters than you), multiple targets, varying ranges, restricted hit areas, no-shoots, shooting on the move, use of cover...things you do not experience at a lane shooting range, or even by yourself in an open range. Things you normally focus on during practice go out the window.
    OD* likes this.
    Sticks

    Grasseater // Grass~eat~er noun, often attributive \ˈgras-ē-tər\
    A person who is incapable of independent thought; a person who is herd animal-like in behavior; one who cannot distinguish between right and wrong; a foolish person.
    See also Sheep

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    For some people the natural ability to pick up a handgun of any size or caliber and shoot it well is normal. Others have to shop around to find a weapon that is more "comfortable". Just like your P30 is not comfortable to conceal so to speak, with the word "comfortable" being used in general terms.

    There are handguns that are simply not "comfortable", i.e. Glock 21, in my hand, not saying I cannot max out a course of fire with them, just dont feel as good as others. I look at most firearms, my working guns, as a tool nothing more. Yes some tools work better or look prettier but they are all tools. Some folks have to find just that right tool be it a firearm, car, couch or whatever makes them "comfortable".

    To the OP you first have to define combat accuracy or what you want the firearm and you to do. COM chest hits, 10-12 inches within 10 yards can be done with about anything if that is your definition. My definition is the firearm have the capability to make a headshot at 25 yards or farther so my firearm will be different from yours. Set your boundries and then find what firearm fits inside them.

    And to answer your question, yes I carry a Glock 19 sometimes because it is comfortable in my hand or holster.
    "A first rate man with a third rate gun is far better than the other way around". The gun is a tool, you are the craftsman that makes it work. There are those who say "if I had to do it, I could" yet they never go out and train to do it. Don't let stupid be your mindset. Harryball 2013

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    VIP Member Array tkruf's Avatar
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    Why not consider the Kahr PM9/CW9/CM9 or the Walther P99 ? Otherwise I say go with the Glock 26.
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    Ruger SR9c Ruger LCP

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    VIP Member Array searcher 45's Avatar
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    I do not like nor trust the new single stack 9mm because they are too big and too small.

    Too big to deep conceal and too small for ME to shoot well, they always seemed like a compromise without the benefits of either need.

    Answer for me was Glock 36 6+1 45acp primary and Kel Tec P3AT 380acp 6+1 BUG.

    To OP hope you find what will serve you well.
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    Senior Member Array C Bennett's Avatar
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    Go SR9c feels good in the hand and is RELIABLE AND ACCURATE as my Glock 23 ever was. I also like the Glock 36 but its the ONLY Glock id own..the M&P is real nice and the XD isnt bad either.

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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    A G26 can easily keep all shots on a regular sheet of notebook paper at 50 yards. Most quality weapons can.
    Defining combat accuracy is best left up to the individual as needed per individual concerns.
    I have yet to see a mass produced firearm that cannot be used accurately enough to satisfy most SD requirements.
    tacman605 likes this.
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