.357 Sig Recoil question? Glock 32 or 33....

This is a discussion on .357 Sig Recoil question? Glock 32 or 33.... within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Devone6 Exactly my sentiments, 357Sig just a hair snappier than the 40S&W but still very controllable with a good strong grip, at least that is ...

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Thread: .357 Sig Recoil question? Glock 32 or 33....

  1. #16
    Member Array Bigpoppa48's Avatar
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    Devone6 Exactly my sentiments, 357Sig just a hair snappier than the 40S&W but still very controllable with a good strong grip, at least that is what I have found out of my S&WM&P357Sig/40S&W

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  3. #17
    VIP Member Array 357and40's Avatar
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    Quote taken from
    .357 SIG - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The goal of the .357 SIG project was to offer a level of performance equal to the highly effective 125 grains (8.1 g) .357 Magnum load.[13][14] The .357 SIG accomplishes this with a 125 grains (8.1 g) bullet at a muzzle velociy of 1,450 feet per second (440 m/s) out of a 4 in (102 mm) barrel, which is generally identical to the velocity achieved by standard factory 125 grains (8.1 g)r .357 Magnum loads out of a 4 in (102 mm) revolver barrel.[citation needed](A check of advertised ballistics both in articles from the late 1990s & current ballistics tables from ammunition manufacturers show commonly a nominal velocity of 1,350fps for the .357 SIG with a 125gr bullet in a 4" bbl.) The .357 SIG gains extra muzzle velocity when fired from a longer barrel, like an after-market drop-in 6 in (152 mm) barrel.(This might achieve a velocity of 1450fps.)
    With a simplistic approach to physics, recoil being directly proportional to "muzzle velocity x bullet mass" (due to conservation of momentum), the recoil of the .357 SIG is equal to or slightly less than that of the .40 S&W, and less than that of the full-power 10 mm Auto loads or the original .357 Magnum,[15] Handgun Recoil table as well as Federal and.[16] This simple approach to recoil is only part of the story as it is not only the properties of the bullet that produce recoil, a more important effect is the rocket like blast of propellant gases coming out of the barrel, after the bullet leaves the muzzle, that plays a greater role in the felt recoil[17]. A more accurate view on recoil is that it is proportional to the mass of all ejecta x velocity of ejecta.[18] Even so, recoil calculated in this manner is only the starting point in a comparison with the .357 Magnum cartridge, since the latter is used in a revolver, in which all the recoil energy is due to the Bullet and propellant, while the .357 SIG cartridge is frequently used in a semi-automatic pistol of recoil operation, in which a significant portion of the recoil energy is diverted to cycle the action, effectively prolonging the recoil phase.
    In comparing the energy levels of premium self defense ammunition the muzzle energy of 584 ft.lbs (792 J) of the 125 grains (8.1 g) 1,450 feet per second (440 m/s) .357 SIG load is higher than either the 475 ft∑lbf (644 J) generated by a 155 grains (10.0 g) 1,175 feet per second (358 m/s) Speer GoldDot .40 S&W load or the 400 ft∑lbf (540 J) generated by a 180 grains (12 g) 985 feet per second (300 m/s) Speer GoldDot .40 S&W load.[19]
    Like the 10 mm Auto, the .357 SIG can be down-loaded to reduce recoil, to the point where recoil is similar to that of a 9x19mm Parabellum. However, since the .357 SIG uses bullets that are generally the same as those used in the 9 mm Para,[20] downloading it to this point would defeat the purpose of having the SIG cartridge in the first place, as recoil and ballistics would be identical to the less-powerful 9 mm cartridge.
    Because the .357 SIG fires at relatively high pressures, muzzle flash and noise are significant with standard loads, even with longer barrels. Utilizing loads with specialized powders and experimenting with different bullet weights can reduce flash.
    Look at performance characteristics toward top right of article... the round MOVES. A properly loaded round will penetrate a windshield & still have enough payload to penetrate flesh & bone effectively. Another benefit is the design of the round basically eliminates feed problems.
    zonker1986 likes this.
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  4. #18
    Member Array Aaron1100us's Avatar
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    I have a G33 and a G22. The recoil on the G33 is more snappy than the G22. It really is a blast to shoot. It shoots fatter than the .40 also. And a necked down pistol cartridge looks pretty cool too:)

    Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

  5. #19
    Senior Member Array Texag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 21bubba View Post
    Our resident ill informed 357Sig hater.
    The one posting actual testing data is ill informed? Did the definition of the word change?
    I collect ammo, not guns.

  6. #20
    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texag View Post
    A better question is what logical reason is there to use .357 sig? Its terminal performance doesn't show any noticeable difference from 9mm, and is slightly worse than .40 for the same capacity and increased cost.

    Winchester Ranger-T

    Federal HST

    Speer Gold Dot
    OK, I get it. You don't care for the 357 SIG, and have charts and paperwork to explain why. I can't counter your evidence, as I am not a paper ballistics fan. It is accurate. It is fun to shoot. It is also expensive to feed. Like pretty much anything else out there, I sure wouldn't want to get shot with one. But if the OP is interested in one, let those of us who have them and enjoy them tell him why. And then let him decide. I am going to go out on a limb, and guess that since you do not care for the 357 SIG, you probably do not own one and therefore do not have a heck of a lot of valid input. Discounting, of course, all the stuff you have read, all of which can be countered by stuff other guys (ever heard of Massad Ayoob?) have written about it.

  7. #21
    Distinguished Member Array 21bubba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texag View Post
    The one posting actual testing data is ill informed? Did the definition of the word change?
    You use "data" that supports your opinion and ignore the rest and real world experiences. I am no match for your google-fu and won't try to bring you into the real world. You have voiced your opinions in the past and honestly you sound like a broken record, a broken record that nobody wants to hear. I seriously question the number of 357Sig rounds you have even fired, not just read about.
    multistage likes this.

  8. #22
    Member Array GettingOld2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texag;2123302

    [URL="http://www.everydaynodaysoff.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Speer-Gold-Dot-Ammunition-Comparison.jpg"
    Speer Gold Dot[/URL]
    There's something wrong with that chart. The very first two show identical weights with the faster round having less energy, that's not possible.

    I believe the first entry has a typo reducing its velocity by 200 ft/sec.

    I didn't check any further.

  9. #23
    Member Array jasgo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyDTrigger View Post
    How is the .357 Sig's recoil? How does it compare with the 9mm for instance? I have a G26... how will it compare with the Glock 33? or what other caliber is it close to? .357Mag? a hot .40? I am considering another Glock, and am curious about the .357 Sig.

    I am just trying to get an idea of what it feels like. I also have a Glock 29SF which I enjoy shooting and its recoil is not a problem.

    I would appreciate any comments.

    I have both a G19 and a G32 (with extra .40SW barrel). Never really considered the subcompact Glocks much as I think the compact models can be concealed adequately enough and not sacrifice in handling qualities. A shorter barrel can negate ballistics and decreases sight radius. Probably get really good ballistics with a G31. With the compacts, I think if you are an experienced and good shooter with a 9mm, I don't think going to a .357Sig is a major transition. Of course, it will take practice and familiarity. I shot some .40SW out of it to compare (using the extra barrel). I prefer the flatter shooting .357Sig and the fun of shooting it. The .357 recoil is snappier than the .40 but I think both are no more different in the challenge of control for repeat shots. Ammo cost is a factor in going to this caliber.

    I don't have a G33 but I don't think going to a .357 in a subcompact will be worth it. I think you give up too much in increased recoil (less mass) and decreased ballistics. Be happy with your G26 with some good +P 9mm ammo. I keep the G19 loaded for inside the house defense as the .357Sig will give a lot more noise and flash inside the house than a 9mm. Doesn't make sense to worsen deafening and blinding yourself after one shot inside your own house. Overpenetration is a concern too if you have family members.

    I don't get out to the woods much anymore but I if I did, I'd feel comfortable having a G31 or G32 as the .357Sig is very flat shooting in case you need to make longer range shots. Guns are like tools, have to carry one to fit the application.

    I side with the .357Sig vs the .40SW in the ballistics argument as I used to favor carrying a 4"bbl .357Magnum S&W 66 with 125gr JHP in my much younger days. I think if you look it up, the .357Magnum in 125gr JHP is proven in recorded incidents for stopping power which the .357Sig ballistics mimic. Some important Federal agencies use the .357Sig.

    Get a G32 with an extra .40SW barrel!

  10. #24
    Senior Member Array ZX9RCAM's Avatar
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    I had my first experience ever with a .357 sig last weekend.
    At an indoor range, the guy next to me was shooting what seemed to be a large caliber gun as it felt
    I perceived what seemd like a "shock wave" from the next stall, after he left I checked out the shells
    on the ground & saw they were .357 sigs.....
    Surprised me to say the least, does this sound typical to other people who have fired this round??
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    Im a big fan of the .22LR for bear defense.
    Just shoot the guy next to you in the knee and run like heck.

  11. #25
    Senior Member Array Texag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 21bubba View Post
    You use "data" that supports your opinion and ignore the rest and real world experiences. I am no match for your google-fu and won't try to bring you into the real world. You have voiced your opinions in the past and honestly you sound like a broken record, a broken record that nobody wants to hear. I seriously question the number of 357Sig rounds you have even fired, not just read about.
    Want the real world? Go read Dr. Roberts' opinion on the round, then try to find someone with more access to both gel testing and real world shootings.

    As for my experience, I've fired a few mags through a friends 229..40 recoil, 9mm would cavity. I'm not missing out on anything.
    I collect ammo, not guns.

  12. #26
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    You'll never have an idea of what it feels like until you feel it. Everyone's different. How they perceive. For the most part....I think many folks are weenies when it comes to pain but yet they want to survive. Paradox to me. You handle what you can handle.......so long as you've gone as far as you can....you make a stand. If you have the will to go further after the pain, then you have a better chance of survival.
    If it hurts in order to survive, I'll almost bet some folks are already falling over dead at the thought. Sad in a way, but real as I'm talking to you. Simple truth. Look around you.

  13. #27
    Senior Member Array ks kid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZX9RCAM View Post
    I had my first experience ever with a .357 sig last weekend.
    At an indoor range, the guy next to me was shooting what seemed to be a large caliber gun as it felt
    I perceived what seemd like a "shock wave" from the next stall, after he left I checked out the shells
    on the ground & saw they were .357 sigs.....
    Surprised me to say the least, does this sound typical to other people who have fired this round??
    yep, thats what Ive been told by people standing next to me when I shoot mine. I dont notice it while shooting though.

  14. #28
    Member Array ninemm's Avatar
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    In my experience, it is more like a hot 9 rather than a 40. I really enjoyed my .357 Sig. They are very accurate and easy to control. The loud blast without ear protection was my only negative.

  15. #29
    Senior Member Array TonyDTrigger's Avatar
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    Thanks to all. I appreciate the comments. So far I am getting really interested in getting something in .357 Sig. I have been looking at a Sig, M&P, and saw a Glock 32 just this week. I wonder when Glock will have a Gen4 G32? I am a bit worry about it being too loud, but then again my G29SF is pretty loud, and it is not a problem. Is it louder than a 29SF 10mm? or a SP101 in .357 magnum?

  16. #30
    Member Array jasgo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyDTrigger View Post
    Thanks to all. I appreciate the comments. So far I am getting really interested in getting something in .357 Sig. I have been looking at a Sig, M&P, and saw a Glock 32 just this week. I wonder when Glock will have a Gen4 G32? I am a bit worry about it being too loud, but then again my G29SF is pretty loud, and it is not a problem. Is it louder than a 29SF 10mm? or a SP101 in .357 magnum?
    Have had extensive experience with .357Mag and .44Mag revolvers of all barrel lengths. My Glock 32 (4"bbl) has nowhere near the noise, flash, and recoil of those. Very pleasant to shoot when compared to shooting those full loaded revolvers. By the way, most factory .357Sig ballistics are from an actual 4" barrel. I think I saw something about problems of some Gen4s in one chambering. Might want to research. If the Gen4 came out in the G32, I'd probably wait for it to mature first.

    I think choice of gun depends on purpose (CCW, range use, or home defense), how it feels in your hand, and budget. I went with Glocks as they are simple, not as long a trigger pull as a DAO, fairly priced, light (for CCW), and rugged/reliable. Had a G17 and shot it a lot without cleaning much and it always functioned. If you are getting primarily for range use, then a SA/DA will be easier to shoot precisely. If not for CCW, then a longer barrel and heavier gun will be better for this cartridge.

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