Having trouble getting used to my new sig sauer p229r 40s&w - Page 2

Having trouble getting used to my new sig sauer p229r 40s&w

This is a discussion on Having trouble getting used to my new sig sauer p229r 40s&w within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; With my FN I had to spend a couple of hundred rounds getting used to the DA. Bang, de-cock, repeat. Made all the difference in ...

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Thread: Having trouble getting used to my new sig sauer p229r 40s&w

  1. #16
    Member Array mattbeals's Avatar
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    With my FN I had to spend a couple of hundred rounds getting used to the DA. Bang, de-cock, repeat. Made all the difference in the world. Now I am much more confident and comfortable carrying DA with the safety on or off.
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  2. #17
    Member Array Crowbait's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nwbackpacker View Post
    No manual safety on this gun. Carrying cocked sure puts a really light trigger on the weapon. Not sure I'd feel comfortable with that, personally...
    My bad!!!! I forgot this didn't have a manual safety!! So sorry man. Yeah, don't carry in condition one...
    ďA free people ought not only to be armed and disciplined, but they should have sufficient arms and ammunition to maintain a status of independence from any who might attempt to abuse them, which would include their own government.Ē --George Washington

  3. #18
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowbilly32 View Post
    Glock owners like me carry in condition 1 daily. Train your nose picker to stay off the bang switch until you want to shoot something.
    Condition 1 refers to a round chambered and magazine loaded, condition 3 is mag loaded but weapon not chambered. I think your referring to carrying in single action mode. Glocks are designed to carry with a round chambered and the striker cocked (there is no decocking a striker fired pistol,) sigs arent designed to do that unless you get a sao variant and then it will have a thumb safety similar to a 1911. Finger dicipline aside i also think carrying a sig cocked is a bad idea.

  4. #19
    Distinguished Member Array Toorop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattbeals View Post
    With my FN I had to spend a couple of hundred rounds getting used to the DA. Bang, de-cock, repeat. Made all the difference in the world. Now I am much more confident and comfortable carrying DA with the safety on or off.
    I would suggest doing the above. Just keep shooting the gun in DA and it will get smoothed out. Your shooting will also improve as well. There is no other way except to practice or get a DAO gun.

  5. #20
    Distinguished Member Array Elk Hunter's Avatar
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    Practice building the pressure until it breaks and trap the trigger, just another part of training your finger, as the others have said decock and repeat

  6. #21
    Member Array kmagnuss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    That's a horse of a different color. The Glock requires additional compression of the firing pin spring via the trigger during the trigger stroke, hence the "safe action" trigger. The OP's Sig has a decocker but no separate safety, so carrying it with a round in the chamber and the hammer cocked is actually "condition 0" - and is virtually the same as carrying a 1911 cocked and unlocked.
    Not entirely... there's a firing pin block...so like the Glock... unless you pull the trigger it's not going to go off.

  7. #22
    Distinguished Member Array Toorop's Avatar
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    A good suggestion might be to get a Glock. ;)
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  8. #23
    Member Array Dingle1911's Avatar
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    I am going through the same thing, dry fire practice seems to be helping. I am getting a whole lot more hits when I shot at the plate rack than I did before my dry fire practice. It only takes a few minutes every day. Enjoy your Sig, in my opinion it is a great pistol.
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  9. #24
    Senior Member Array itschuck's Avatar
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    I would replace the trigger for a DAK trigger.. I have had both and by far the DAK is the better trigger.
    Current collection: Too many according to the wife...

  10. #25
    Senior Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    Itís not just the DA; youíve got to practice the ďtransitionĒ after the DA first shot to SA. Thatís very tough to do other than live firing.

    When I bought my 220ST, I went through the same process, probably spent close to a 1000 rounds practicing the DA initial pull, then the SA pull. I spent quite a bit of time doing nothing but double taps. I got to be pretty good with it, before I came to the conclusion that I just didnít like DA/SA guns, so I went back to 1911s. For me at least the transition wasnít an easy thing to do quickly and my times suffered.

    IF I really wanted to stick with a SIG, Iíd go the DAK route.

    Chuck
    homo homini lupus est

  11. #26
    Member Array danfive555's Avatar
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    This is what worked for me.

    1. Breaking in/smoothing out after 1000+ rounds (most SA)
    2. 1000+ dry fires (guesstimate)
    3. working on grip strength (squeezy-balls and farmer's walk exercise)

    I've got three sigs. At first I thought the DA pull would stay very strong, until a bought an old p226 that had been smoothened out from high round count (or something). That's what prompted me to start dry firing my P229s.

    The smooth DA, once broken in, is worth the trouble, it has a great smooth feel.

  12. #27
    Member Array Eaglebeak's Avatar
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    Personally, I don't own a single DA/SA pistol because I'm either too stupid or too uncoordinated (perhaps both) to place consistantly accurate shots with the totally inconsistent trigger pull, weight, and travel impedance differences between the first DA shot and second SA shot. I'm fine with the DA revolvers and DAO pistols I own and equally fine with all the SA's as well because their respective trigger characteristics remain consistent from first to last shot.

    If it's of any help at all, I did experience pretty unimpressive close-range shot groups with my first DAO pistols because they seemed to have quite different characteristics than the DA revolvers I regularly shoot. However, after taking the advice of an old shooter (far more experienced than myself), my shot groups tightened up very good when I began firmly and quickly pulling the DAO trigger instead of the traditional slow-squeeze method I've always used on wheel guns.

    He advised to try two different methods to see which one worked best. (1) take a firm grip on the pistol and quickly (without "jerking" it) pull the trigger straight back with the thought in mind that you're going to touch the tip of your trigger finger into the crotch of your thumb and hand, or (2) with a firm grip on the pistol, quickly "milk" or "grip-shoot" by rapidly tightening your grip and trigger finger at the same time. if you're better than I am at the art (no challenge there), then you can get off a very accurate "quick-pull" first DA shot then mentally/physically convert to your SA technique for the rest.

    Remember that it's imperative for your first shot to be well-placed in any self-defense scenario, so practice whatever technique is necessary to make that first one count regardless of what type action you're using.

  13. #28
    Member Array kmagnuss's Avatar
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    I'll second Dan here... my new Sig 229 trigger sucks compared to my old sig 228 with probably over 5k rounds on it.

    Oh, and farmer's walk is one of my favorites. :) Next to squats and deads of course.
    Quote Originally Posted by danfive555 View Post
    This is what worked for me.

    1. Breaking in/smoothing out after 1000+ rounds (most SA)
    2. 1000+ dry fires (guesstimate)
    3. working on grip strength (squeezy-balls and farmer's walk exercise)

    I've got three sigs. At first I thought the DA pull would stay very strong, until a bought an old p226 that had been smoothened out from high round count (or something). That's what prompted me to start dry firing my P229s.

    The smooth DA, once broken in, is worth the trouble, it has a great smooth feel.

  14. #29
    Senior Member Array yz9890's Avatar
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    my P229R trigger has always been smooth and predictable and the sights were dead on right from the box. one of my friends can't hit anything with it though. we assume that's because he owns no da/sa handguns. I'm sure you'll get use to it. it's a heavy pig but I love it.

    you can send it to Sigarms for a SRT trigger also. that may help. I think they run $140 or so. good luck.
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  15. #30
    Senior Member Array Vaquero 45's Avatar
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    There is no reason to handicap yourself with a DA/SA trigger. Choose a striker fired platform, buy ammo and practice.

    I owned a P229 DA/SA for less than 24 hours once. Bought it used (awesome deal), shot it, and realized what a bad idea it would be to switch back and forth between the Sig and my Glocks for defensive use. Sold it for what I had in it, and have never wanted another.

    I believe that one should pick an action type and stick with it for their defensive gun needs. All the same brand would be the best scenario, but different brands of pistols with the same manual of arms (Glock, M&P, etc.) would also work. If you want to expend the effort to master the Sig, pick a trigger system (DA/SA or DAK) and stick with it for all of your defensive gun needs.
    Slow is smooth.....smooth is fast.

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