Advantage of owning multiple caliber

This is a discussion on Advantage of owning multiple caliber within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; It's good to be proficient with many tools. My guns range from 22, 380, 9, 38, 357, 40, 45, 223 and 12 gauge. If it ...

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 51 of 51
Like Tree21Likes

Thread: Advantage of owning multiple caliber

  1. #46
    Member Array CDRGlock's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    485
    It's good to be proficient with many tools. My guns range from 22, 380, 9, 38, 357, 40, 45, 223 and 12 gauge.

    If it is $1000 you have then I recommend saving it for a rainy day. If you buy another gun, you'll need ammo, mags, holster and whatever else. You can easily add $200-$300 on top of your gun purchase.


    Lifetime NRA Member
    NRA, Lifetime Member

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #47
    Member Array Bear67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Greater Texas
    Posts
    171
    Logic:
    l. I like to shoot guns.
    2. Guns come in many calibers.
    3. Therefore, should own many guns in many calibers and the ammunition to enjoy them

  4. #48
    Member Array Bear67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Greater Texas
    Posts
    171
    My post above was only somewhat in jest. I have pistols in all of the major large pistol calibers (.38, .357, 9 mm, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, .45 acp) and several of the minor ones. I keep enough ammunition or components on hand to be able to shoot them and have a reserve. I enjoy shooting a variety of pistols and revolvers, therefore the contents of my safe reflect this.

    I have a Glock 31 with barrels for .40 and 9mm to have a triple threat or three times the fun. I also have a SIG with more than one barrel. I am an old man and love my 1911s, but I have a current issue M-9. Variety makes life more enjoyable.

    IMHO, you can not have enough variety in .22 rimfire pistols and revolvers. This is cheap and fun to shoot and is great practice for any shooting situation.

    New Logic:
    l. Buy guns
    2. Buy ammo
    3. Shoot and enjoy

  5. #49
    Senior Member Array mr surveyor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Texas, South of the Sabine
    Posts
    1,149
    given a $1000 budget, and the original options suggested by the OP, I would opt for more calibers and ammunition. I really don't think you have to shoot many thousands of rounds per year to stay operationally proficient with any firearm, although one does need to "know" his firearms. Given that thought, a simple .357 revolver is easy to learn the fundamentals, particularly at SD/HD distance needs. Yes, to be a "bullseye" shooter one will probably need the large ammo budget and routine practice, but for basic needs one can be adequately proficient as long as the gun fits the hand. The .357 mag revolver gives you multitudes of ammo choices in both .38 spcl and .357 mag, including shotshells. I'm also in the camp with the idea that everyone should have at least one .22 lr firearm, either handgun or rifle. If it came down to only one of the two, I'd choose a pistol, preferably a Ruger MKx (I prefer the older MKII) or Browning Buckmark, or possibly the new SP101 in .22 lr with 4" barrel (haven't handled one yet). The .22 ammo is still relatively inexpensive, easy to store in quantity, and fills many needs/uses.

    So, with $1000 to invest I would opt for both a .357 revo and a .22 cal pistol, and divvy up the balance of the funds for a few boxes of various 38/357 ammo and a few cartons of .22 lr. I guess that puts me in the "more calibers" column, but I find that in my day to day life that different circumstances call for different tools.


    surv

  6. #50
    Member Array .45acpguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    327
    Good discussion on this thread.

    I lean toward fewer calibers.

    I have a Ruger Mk III for .22LR (great fun to shoot and the ammo is quite affordable).

    I have a Glock G36 (for my CCW) and I also have a Glock G30SF. Both are .45acp.

    Then, there is the Judge, which accepts either .410 shotshells or .45 long colt. My personal choice for self defense loads are the .410 Winchester PDX1. My wife has her choice of the Judge or the Ruger Mk III for any problems at home.

    We also have a Mossberg shotgun (12 guage) with a bunch of ammo on hand.

    I have more than enough ammo for the Judge, the shotgun, and the Ruger Mk III.

    I continue to acquire .45acp ammo for my primary self defense handguns the G36 and the G30SF. While the .45acp ammo can be more pricey than other ammunition choices, it's ability to rapidly "end the threat" more than makes up for that issue. Therefore, I am stockpiling .45acp.

  7. #51
    Member Array CDRGlock's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    485
    Once you master a double action trigger of a revolver, shooting any other gun comes easy. Irregardless of design. The nuances of how the different guns handle comes with shooting frequently. I shoot a multitude. No significant difference.


    Lifetime NRA Member
    NRA, Lifetime Member

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

different caliber handguns
,
different caliber pistols
,
multi caliber glock
,

multi caliber guns

,
multi caliber handguns
,

multi caliber pistol

,
multi caliber pistols
,
multi caliber revolver
,
multiple caliber handgun
,

multiple caliber handguns

,

multiple caliber pistol

,
multiple caliber revolver
Click on a term to search for related topics.