What about dry firing?

This is a discussion on What about dry firing? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I know there are benefits to dry fire practice,but after talking with some about it,I still don't know if it will damage,or cause premature wear ...

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Thread: What about dry firing?

  1. #1
    Ex Member Array RayBar's Avatar
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    What about dry firing?

    I know there are benefits to dry fire practice,but after talking with some about it,I still don't know if it will damage,or cause premature wear on the firing mechanism. what about dry firing your guns,will it hurt them?.

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    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
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    Old rimfire .22s, yes. Cheap zinc framed blowback pistols, yes. Modern high quality guns, never seen a problem. I hear the new Ruger SR series has an issue, but I'm not familiar with the design.
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    Distinguished Member Array deadguy's Avatar
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    dry firing is fine.
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    If you are worried, get some snap caps, or better yet a LaserLyte cartridge so you can see where your "shots" are hitting.
    tacman605 and nerdyvirgin like this.
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    New Member Array starrfish's Avatar
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    Kel-tecs advise against it, I have also heard that the Ruger SR series has an issue as well.

    Quick fix use snap caps. I use Tipton Snap Caps for my 9mm and looking at A-Zoom for my .380

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    Modern firearms, dry firing should be fine, except rimfire guns. Older guns, especially with the firing pin as part of the hammer I'd avoid it.
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    Distinguished Member Array Stubborn's Avatar
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    If you're concerned about it use "snap caps" or a spent casing.
    Dry fire practice is a great tool for training.
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    Only gun I know of that has a true problem with dry firing is the Ruger P345.
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    Trigger spring on my friends 19 broke during a match several years ago. We figured she had about 60k live rounds and a bazillions dry fires on the gun. POS :)

    I don't know what the moral to my story is, but ... I wouldn't own a gun I couldn't dry fire.

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    cj
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    Senior Member Array cj's Avatar
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    For some reason (probably based on a time when dry-firing was possibly damaging to designs), many fear and avoid dry firing. Even on this board a comment on dry firing was recently met by a rather self-righteous sounding response along the lines of 'YOU do it all you want, I'M not going to' after being referred to a manual stating that it's perfectly fine.

    I'm not sure how people miss it, but just about every decent shooter that I've heard talk about the topic (including the top competitors) talk about the importance of dry firing to any training regimen. As other mention, snap caps have some good uses for dry firing and other drills, but just check your manual and it will probably address the issue.

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    CZ manual says don't dry fire without a snap cap.
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    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    If dry firing will damage your gun, then you need to quite carrying a rimfire or buy a better gun! ;)

    I dry fire my Glocks, M&Ps and AR's daily for a minimum of 20 minutes, but usually more if I can. I've been doing this for years. 2 years with the same Glock 17 and M&P 9 and before that with higher end 1911's. Same goes for the ARs. No damage at all. The only thing that has come of it is that I don't lose a perishable skill (trigger control) and my triggers got smoother quicker.

    Anyone that tells you it will damage a modern defensive handgun is just wrong.

    I don't often use dummy rounds for dry fire, but I do mix them into my mags when running drills at the range. So, I definitely recommend picking some up whether for training or just peace of mind (if you are still concerned). Also, you should always have spare parts around whether it can damage the gun or not.
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    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superhouse 15 View Post
    Old rimfire .22s, yes. Cheap zinc framed blowback pistols, yes. Modern high quality guns, never seen a problem. I hear the new Ruger SR series has an issue, but I'm not familiar with the design.
    Fortunately, modern high quality handguns and Ruger do not fit into the same category, so dry firing not damaging high quality handguns even if it does damage a Ruger is still a true statement! :D
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

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    Member Array swelly61's Avatar
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    From what I understand its ok to dryfire a strikerfired pistol.... Not revolvers or DA/SA pistols(So anything with a hammer is bad)

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    VIP Member Array jonconsiglio's Avatar
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    Quality DA/SA handguns that are not rimfire are absolutely fine to dry fire on quality handguns like HK's, Sigs, Berettas, etc.
    Proven combat techniques may not be flashy and may require a bit more physical effort on the part of the shooter. Further, they may not win competition matches, but they will help ensure your survival in a shooting or gunfight on the street. ~Paul Howe

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