For those who mess with Glock spring setups, perhaps you can enlighten me. . .

This is a discussion on For those who mess with Glock spring setups, perhaps you can enlighten me. . . within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Most everyone seems to automatically change the recoil spring to something like a 13lber on 9mm competition guns from what I have read. Usually, they ...

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Thread: For those who mess with Glock spring setups, perhaps you can enlighten me. . .

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    New Member Array javaman's Avatar
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    Question For those who mess with Glock spring setups, perhaps you can enlighten me. . .

    Most everyone seems to automatically change the recoil spring to something like a 13lber on 9mm competition guns from what I have read. Usually, they also go with the Wolf competition spring kit that includes a reduced power striker spring, safety plunger spring, etc. The standard disclaimer that goes with this is "not for duty use, as light primer strikes can occur with reduced power striker spring." However, everyone seems to agree that the guns feel and shoot better set up this way, and the trigger pull is improved as well. Most of these guys seem to be shooting loads with power factors similar to defense ammo as well, and if their guns were puking due to misfires, I doubt they would continue to use this setup. Does anyone here ever use something like this on a carry gun? Also, wouldn't swapping the stock striker for a lighter one offset the weaker spring, due to the higher speed of the lighter striker (since kinetic energy equations heavily favor velocity over mass: i.e., wouldn't the lighter striker's velocity gain offset the loss of mass in the original striker with stock spring?), eliminate light strikes altogether? This seems logical to me, but I would like some pros to set me straight on this. Thanks.

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    I shoot a G17 in IDPA and in my classes,all I have ever done is a 3.5 connector and an "Increased Power" trigger spring,this helps you pull the trigger.The only glocks,other than the gen 4 problems,I ever see fail are the ones with reduced power striker springs,titanium stikers...,My set-up gives me a true 4 pound trigger,that way I can have the same trigger on my EDC as my comp gun.As many know some ammo has harder primers than others,Gaston Glock new this also thats why the gun is at half cock,and the striker is semi-pointed,change to many things and expect problems.I've been a Glock Certified armorer for 7 years,and have fixed many guns that people try to get a 1911 trigger on their Glock.Ken Hackathorn has a good quote about the Glock"Take it out of the box and shoot it."

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    VIP Member Array Yoda's Avatar
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    I changed the recoil spring assembly in mine to the stainless version but did not change the spring force. I just didn't like the plastic guide rod that looks like you could break with your fingers. I didn't have a problem with the performance of the stock spring and I don't shoot competition. Mine is a gen 2 Glock 19.
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    Member Array Nutrodoc's Avatar
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    A man who called himself a Glocksmith at a gun show told me that he had used reduced force recoil springs for more than ten thousand rounds with no problems. Following his advise, I put a 12# in my 17 and a 15# in my 19. The lighter springs allowed my wife - who has had wrist surgery - to rack and lock the slide. One major problem: When I took them to the range, I discovered that every few shots, the slide would not quite go into battery - probably just about a quarter of an inch shy. Obviously that is not acceptable so I restored the original springs and everything works great. I do not recommend lighter recoil springs.

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    VIP Member Array Yoda's Avatar
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    The recoil spring will not affect the trigger pull, I think there is some confusion with the connector and/or the trigger spring.

    The connector does get frequently changed to improve the trigger performance. Aftermarket Ghost and Lone Wolf connectors change the angle to adjust the pull force on the trigger. Glock (OEM) also has changeable trigger parts.
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    New Member Array javaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nutrodoc View Post
    A man who called himself a Glocksmith at a gun show told me that he had used reduced force recoil springs for more than ten thousand rounds with no problems. Following his advise, I put a 12# in my 17 and a 15# in my 19. The lighter springs allowed my wife - who has had wrist surgery - to rack and lock the slide. One major problem: When I took them to the range, I discovered that every few shots, the slide would not quite go into battery - probably just about a quarter of an inch shy. Obviously that is not acceptable so I restored the original springs and everything works great. I do not recommend lighter recoil springs.
    Yes, as I understand it, if you go with the light recoil spring you really need to go with the reduced power striker spring as well, or the semi-cock of the striker as you pull the trigger can overcome the weak recoil spring and take the gun out of battery slightly.

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    New Member Array javaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yoda View Post
    The recoil spring will not affect the trigger pull, I think there is some confusion with the connector and/or the trigger spring.

    The connector does get frequently changed to improve the trigger performance. Aftermarket Ghost and Lone Wolf connectors change the angle to adjust the pull force on the trigger. Glock (OEM) also has changeable trigger parts.
    Yes, I know that; the reduced power striker spring does affect trigger pull though, which is why I was wondering if you could overcome misfire problems by also lightening the striker to increase its impact velocity. If, as I understand it, you can tune the pistol's recoil characteristics by changing the recoil spring and improve the trigger pull by changing the striker spring, why no one does this on carry guns if the competition shooters aren't having any misfire problems out of this setup? Thanks.

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    VIP Member Array Yoda's Avatar
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    I don't have a direct answer to your query.

    However, the warnings for non standard striker springs that show on the Wolf web site may be there for legal reasons.

    Does Glock (OEM) make a reduced power striker spring? I haven't seen any, and likely the reasoning is they feel a certain minimum force is necessary for a reliable primer strike.

    They (Glock) do offer other spring rates for other springs.
    Yoda, I am, yes.

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    Member Array XDshooter's Avatar
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    I have set up many carry-Glocks in the following way: I polish the internals (stock connector, trigger bar, disconnector, safety plunger face). I then use a Glockworx
    reduced power striker safety spring and reduced power striker spring. The gun retains a basically stock trigger pull weight, but the trigger pull is smoothed out by the
    reduced friction on the newly-polished internals and reduced friction from the lighter springs. My carry piece is a Glock 23c and is set up in this manner.

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