xs 24/7 big dot

This is a discussion on xs 24/7 big dot within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Yeah,I feel that IF(?) ya gotta shoot someone at 25yds., your chances of convinceing the authorities that it was a "good shoot" will be kinda ...

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Thread: xs 24/7 big dot

  1. #16
    Distinguished Member Array RSSZ's Avatar
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    Yeah,I feel that IF(?) ya gotta shoot someone at 25yds., your chances of convinceing the authorities that it was a "good shoot" will be kinda slim.

    Expect to be questioned at length about why you did not try to escape and/or hide, and why you felt like you had to endanger the innocents by sluggin' it out with the BG at the retreatable distances.

    Now I'm not sayin' that a 25(or further) yard shoot will not turn out in the GG's favor. But I would think that your case would be alot harder to prove. Especially if a bullet from your weapon simply kicked sand in the face of an innocent.

    Simply,....I feel that 95% of a persons practice should be shot at 10yds. and fast. Practiceing your draw stroke and your move (both ways) offline. A person would be better served by being able to put at least two, in COM, at 10yds.(max),very quickly. This vs. the slow carefully aimed practice at 25.

    To each their own, but most of my practice starts out with two or three target stands,with plain white paper(8.5 x 11") in COM at 5-7 yards. Sometimes when feeling cocky I fold the paper in half. This, while moving offline to the right or left. Also alternating which target to be shot, in what order. 1st and 3rd.,3rd. and 2nd,etc. It puts a little extra thought process into the training. -------

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  3. #17
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    Betty, you're too young to have bad eyesight.
    I wish I could agree with you, but my lovely prescription costs me over $500 in optics alone (so I switched to contacts), and these are the fancy "ultra thin" variety. Without eye correction, everything is a major blur.

    I stil have a couple focusing issues because of the astigmatism in my right eye, so I really like those Big Dots.
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    "Americans have the will to resist because you have weapons. If you don't have a gun, freedom of speech has no power." - Yoshimi Ishikawa

  4. #18
    Member Array wingchun's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the input everyone !

    I do train alot under ten yards. I sometimes get to shoot with swat and k-9 leo's, we train alot of drills from the holster. This past weekend we did a drill that was great for my job. Draw, anounce" police "( security in my case)," drop the weapon". Then fire two shots to the body ( double tap)and one to the head, starting at ten yards and advancing while shooting. Scan area for threat then reholster. We did this for time, and we did it for about an hour. By the time we were done I did this drill about a dozen times. Now this is part of my dry fire practice.

    These guys are great, they work with my boss as he is a k-9 leo. They had sigs and glocks, I brought up the idea of the big dot. It seems that they don't think they're that great. Only one out of four of these guys even had night sights. I'm getting fast with the standard sig sights, I do like them. I'm just going to practice with what I have for now but I'm leaning towards the xs standard sight size. I really like the rear sight, it looks like even with the standard front sight that it would just fall into place.

    Thanks again

  5. #19
    Member Array HighVelocity's Avatar
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    Then fire two shots to the body ( double tap)and one to the head.
    That's called a Mozambique. There's an interesting history to that drill too.

    Mozambique Drill
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    The Mozambique Drill was added to the modern technique of gunfighting by Jeff Cooper based on the experience of one of his students, Mike Rouseau, while on duty in Mozambique. Rouseau was later killed in action in the Rhodesian War.

    The Mozambique Drill considers the deficiency of the pistol round in stopping an adversary. Statistics show that reactions in gunfights are extremely irregular -- one must be prepared for the worst. Many times it is the case that after absorbing the trauma of the first shots, the enemy will disregard further ballistic insult. It has been pointed out that simply "more shots" are not the answer. The Mozambique Drill instructs the shooter to place a double-tap in the center of mass, followed by a carefully aimed headshot.

    Contrary to popular belief, the immediate aim of defensive shooting is to incapacitate a target so as to render that person unable to attack. Unlike what is commonly seen on television and in movies, gunshot wounds rarely kill instantly. The incapacitation caused by gunshots is the result of neurocirculatory shock. The trauma resulting from impact and wound channel after two shots to a target's center of mass will produce a reflexive nervous system collapse in about 96% of cases. In the other 4%, either an adrenaline rush or the effect of stimulant drugs will override this reflex, and further shots will not produce this instantly-incapacitating shock. Because of this, the third shot should be aimed to destroy the brain, ensuring that the target's nervous system will shut down and leave the target unable to attack. This third shot is most effective when placed between a target's eyes as a higher shot is more likely to deflect off of hard bone and a lower shot is unlikely to produce the nervous system damage required to instantly stop an attacker.

    Also known as the 'failure to stop drill' or '2+1 drill'. As part of the U.S. National Guard Combat Pistol and other military combat pistol competitions, the Mozambique Drill is called Body Armor Defeat, and is frequently a discriminator between the average shooter and the gifted shooter, especially when it is timed.

  6. #20
    Member Array wingchun's Avatar
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    I did not know that. I guess we owe alot of what we know about pistol techniques to Col. Cooper .

    They did describe it as a failure to stop drill. The Idea being that if the first two shots didn't stop the bg they'ld then get one in the head. We did a few drills from inside of seven yards, advancing towards the target on an angle the head shot would be from a couple of feet.

    I didn't realize how much I was doing wrong. My draw was completely messed up. It's now easier to get the gun out and pointed at the target in one smooth motion with no wasted movement.

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