Dry firing

This is a discussion on Dry firing within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; 40 years of being told "The Rules", one of which is "keep your finger off the trigger unless you intend to fire." I don't see ...

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Thread: Dry firing

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    40 years of being told "The Rules", one of which is "keep your finger off the trigger unless you intend to fire."

    I don't see anything rough about it. I also have small kids at home. For me, sticking to the rules as I learned them has kept me from ever having a ND...I intend to keep it that way. If it works for others, I'm not knocking it. It just isn't for me.

    FWIW, I don't have trigger control issues either. I pull hard and fast, just like I would in a SD situation...and I seem to hit the target on a regular basis from various distances. I guess I don't feel the need to do it, and personally wouldn't even if I did. But that's just me. For those who like it, do it, and it helps, then good for them. Do what works.
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  3. #17
    Ex Member Array CaveJohnson's Avatar
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    I dry fired with my revolver in the beginning because it taught me to learn that I was pulling up before I even shot because I was anticipating the recoil before it happened.

    Once I corrected it, I was outshooting my cop and military friends!

  4. #18
    Distinguished Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    40 years of being told "The Rules", one of which is "keep your finger off the trigger unless you intend to fire."

    I don't see anything rough about it. I also have small kids at home. For me, sticking to the rules as I learned them has kept me from ever having a ND...I intend to keep it that way. If it works for others, I'm not knocking it. It just isn't for me.

    FWIW, I don't have trigger control issues either. I pull hard and fast, just like I would in a SD situation...and I seem to hit the target on a regular basis from various distances. I guess I don't feel the need to do it, and personally wouldn't even if I did. But that's just me. For those who like it, do it, and it helps, then good for them. Do what works.
    Your rules for never dry firing in your home as a safety measure are what keep you and your family safe are as good a reason as any Ive heard. But as a learning tool You will be doing your self a big favor to try it. Ive not seen any ones shooting not improve after a few dry fires and a little critical thought as to what is really going on in their trigger pull. Without the recoil of the gun you would be surprised at what the gun is doing while you are pulling the trigger back. Some times Ill balance a coin on the slide as I dry fire. So instead of dry firing at home try it at the range, or out in the barn. You are the only one who will know if it helps you. I hope you will at least give it a try. DR

    Just for others who mentioned rimfires I never dry fire my rimfires without some kind of snap cap or a spent case to keep the firing pin from contacting the breech and peening a hole. I know that some rifle manufactures have made their pins to where they cant make contact. But if I don't do it to any rimfire I wont accidentally damage one of my guns. DR

  5. #19
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    Dry Fire & Buy a GRIPMASTER (Medium) - EBAY - The best few bucks you'll ever spend to improve your shooting.

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  6. #20
    Senior Member Array DocT65's Avatar
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    Check the Operator's Manual for your weapon or call them for advice; different weapons have different recommendations. Snap caps are always an option otherwise.
    "Better to be judged by 12 than carried by 6"

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  7. #21
    Distinguished Member Array Hoganbeg's Avatar
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    I've found it best to be able separate each of the movements/actions of the firing process to locate trouble spots in my technique. Dry firing is an excellent way of doing that without having to be concerned with an actual discharge.

  8. #22
    VIP Member Array SmokinFool's Avatar
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    For those who can't get past the idea that pulling the trigger, even on an empty chamber as the very small, but very real possibility that the chamber may indeed not be empty (though in the many years I have been doing dry fire, my cautious checking, and double checking, and triple checking have enabled me to practice in complete safety), there are dry fire targets you can buy that will stop any handgun round.
    Last edited by SmokinFool; September 19th, 2012 at 12:45 AM.

  9. #23
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    TV/Snap caps, methodical session completion, though I didn't know that's what it's called until that video. Perching a penny or dime, on or in front of the front sight, does wonders for trigger control.

    This usually only happens during initial break-in and after post-range session cleanings, or if I get a new accessory (sights, grips, etc). Otherwise, Chambered & Holstered.
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  10. #24
    VIP Member Array Crowman's Avatar
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  11. #25
    Senior Member Array HK Dan's Avatar
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    You can practice reloads, target tranitions, just about everything that doesnt require recoil. An for those of you without a shot timer, there is an app for that (I pa, I po, I phone, or just about any other smart phone. No excuses. Just do it.

    Dan
    Ps--to the guy with hang ups about ry fire? Get over it. If I were teaching you we'd cut your draw an reload times in half the first night (in most cases). Get over your inhibitions. Youre missing out on a fantastic opportunity
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  12. #26
    Distinguished Member Array bigmacque's Avatar
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    I dry fire routinely and use snap caps all the time, whether the particular gun needs them or not.
    I find the practice in trigger pull pays off in spades. I also bought a BB trap for $20 at Wally World, and practice trigger pulls in the garage with a BB gun. That's actually pretty good practice, as the trigger pull on my cheap little Cross BB gun is easily harder than any of my pistols, especially the revolvers or the 1911's when they're cocked.
    I'm in favor of gun control -- I think every citizen should have control of a gun.
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  13. #27
    Distinguished Member Array bigmacque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crowman View Post
    I use these targets a lot, and find that for the most part they're accurate about any problems.
    I'm in favor of gun control -- I think every citizen should have control of a gun.
    1 Thess. 5:16-18

  14. #28
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HK Dan View Post
    Ps--to the guy with hang ups about ry fire? Get over it. If I were teaching you we'd cut your draw an reload times in half the first night (in most cases). Get over your inhibitions. Youre missing out on a fantastic opportunity
    I fail to see the connection between my personal conviction of not touching a trigger in my home and cutting draw and reload times. Based on the feedback of those I shoot with (some of which are quite accomplished in their own right), I'm in pretty darn good shape with my skills without breaking my personal safety rules.

    My last range session I shot over 700 rounds. Many of those were with a S&W 442 DAO snub Airweight revolver. A whole heck of a lot were with a double action 22 snub revolver. A couple hundred with my PT709 (small light 9mm with a fair amount of recoil). That's my trigger control workout. After 20+ years of shooting DA revolvers (mostly 357 magnums), I just don't see the point in sitting around pulling on an empty gun. If I were new to shooting, or new to DAO triggers maybe...but for me, in my situation, given 40 years of training not to touch the trigger, I'm not going to nor feel the need to get over it.

    I'm not knocking it for anyone else. Do what works for you. When I get home, my guns stay inside the holster or safe. I don't load and unload. They all stay loaded all the time. In the safe inside their box, in the holster. I don't mess with, handle, or fidget with them at home unless it is cleaning time. Then ammo in one room, gun and cleaning gear in another. After the kids have gone to bed. If disassembly requires the trigger to be pulled, I step outside and point it to the ground. It has worked for me for many decades, I'm not fixing what isn't broken.
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  15. #29
    Member Array JEAM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 031131 View Post
    Correct, I don't really know the specifics myself but I'm almost 100% that any .22 hand gun should not be dry fired, .22 rifles are alright to dry fire. Best to check with the maker though for such specifics.
    It will depend on the .22 or any other rimfire for that matter. Whether it's a pistol or rifle has no effect on it, what matters is where the firing pin actually strikes, whether or not it hits the barrel is what matters. you do not want your firing pin hitting the hard steel of the barrel.

    Regards,

    JEAM

  16. #30
    Senior Member Array HK Dan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    I fail to see the connection between my personal conviction of not touching a trigger in my home and cutting draw and reload times.\
    An that failure is why you dont do it. Try it. With a timer you will cut waste from your raw stroke, reload impulse, an anything else you choose to work on. The key element in my phrase was "If I was teaching you". In half, no kidding. I don't care what your skill level is.
    "What does Marcellus Wallace LOOK like?"

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