Dry firing

This is a discussion on Dry firing within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Up until the other day, I had not dry fired a handgun for trigger control. Didn't like the idea of it. I figured that it ...

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Thread: Dry firing

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    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
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    Dry firing

    Up until the other day, I had not dry fired a handgun for trigger control. Didn't like the idea of it. I figured that it wasn't all that critical, something the circuit guys do.

    Last time I was at the range, everything from three different guns was way low and way left. With a center head hold on an IDPA target at 15 yards, the target's shoulder was history. The head remained intact.

    I called a guy around here that is pretty decent and explained the problem. He laughed and said if he doesn't dry fire three times a week for 10-15 minutes, he goes low and left as well. Told me I needed to dry fire, and mind the sights and reset.

    So I did. Hung a rifle target with a 1 inch bull and would draw, fire, rack, and repeat. Surprise, surprise. Every time I squeezed (jerked), the sights went low and left. So I slowed way down and concentrated. Very quickly, the sights stayed put. Might be onto something. Practiced every night for the last four days. Then went to the shoot this morning.

    While I do not consider myself a good shot with a handgun, I can surely say that I have NEVER shot with the degree of accuracy that I shot with today. Oh man, was she right on. Smooth, right where I aimed. Steels, threats, and even the non-threats (oops) were laid out. Best shooting I have ever done with a handgun since I got serious about them a year ago. Confidence is high.

    Dry firing will now be the preferred method of training. Beats running through a box of White Box and still not knowing the problem. Embarassed at not figuring out such an easy fix, but glad it's figured out.
    kmagnuss, Remy and GH like this.

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    VIP Member Array wmhawth's Avatar
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    It came late in the game for me but I had a similar awakening to the benefits of dry fire practice. It has resulted in improved trigger control for me as well.

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    Any practice is good practice.
    Dutch1951 likes this.
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    VIP Member Array SmokinFool's Avatar
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    Coming from a bullseye competition background, I learned the value of dry fire practice early on. Some people don't think it has much value for combat or self defense situations, but I find that if I don't keep up with dry practice, my accuracy even at defensive distances suffers.

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    Make sure you can dry fire your specific weapon. I have some that can't be dryfired. But I practice dryfire with others all the time.

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    Senior Member Array 031131's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrBuckwheat View Post
    Make sure you can dry fire your specific weapon. I have some that can't be dryfired. But I practice dryfire with others all the time.
    Correct, I don't really know the specifics myself but I'm almost 100% that any .22 hand gun should not be dry fired, .22 rifles are alright to dry fire. Best to check with the maker though for such specifics.

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    I dry fire one of my edc Glocks every day. I do about a dozen presentations, as well.
    "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
    Tuco

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    Member Array Indio's Avatar
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    When I took my CCW class in TX, the coach was a accomplished competitive shooter and gave me a couple of pointers to get better. He helped me with my stance and hand position and also directed me to dry fire as much as possible. He told me to watch TV with my gun within reach and when commercials were on, to pick a light switch on the house and have at it. I also practice a drill at the range where I dry fire at least 5 times, then place 1 round on the mag and shoot for accuracy concentrating in all the fundamentals. You will be amazed how much this will help!

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    Member Array Coltman 77's Avatar
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    I've found dry firing to be a very valuable tool. Many handguns can be dry fired without incident, however I use AZoom Snap Caps to protect my firing pins.

    Snap caps are very inexpensive, why take a chance on damaging a pricey sidearm?

    Link:

    A-Zoom Snap Caps, no other snap caps are more precise or rugged
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by multistage View Post
    Every time I squeezed ...
    Here's how I was initially trained ...

    How you squeeze the trigger is ~95% of the issue. Smooth and straight. Depends much upon how the finger's pad is positioned on the surface of the trigger, a position that'll allow you to maintain the straight-back, smooth pull. Depends on the right LOP, as a super-extended (or jammed-up) trigger finger can fail to pull straight. Can somewhat be improved by the gun having decently smooth internal mechanicals (sear), though IMO that's the last tiny improvement to worry about.

    Remember, too, that each and every pull of the trigger can either help you or hinder you. Your choice.

    Glad it's working for you!
    BugDude likes this.
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    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    For those that say guns shouldn't be dry firing is that meaning without snap caps or similar devices or without live rounds only? Would like to practice some of these techniques!
    BigJon


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    Senior Member Array cj's Avatar
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    I've never understood those who dismiss dry fire...last time I mentioned it, I ended up with a snooty response from someone who apparently 'knew better' than to do so. Talk to any top shooter, and I'll bet they use dry practice fairly extensively.

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    Member Array HeadHunter's Avatar
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    Here are a couple of videos about dryfire I made for the Personal Defense Network.



    Closing your dryfire session should be done very methodically to avoid Negligent Discharges.

    Some drink at the fountain of Knowledge, others just gargle.

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    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    I still can't bring myself to do it. I guess having "don't touch the trigger unless you intend on firing the gun" beaten into my head repeatedly for years is just difficult to overcome at my age. It sounds good, and I understand it, but I just can't bring myself to sit around and watch TV pulling the trigger of a gun. And if I'm going somewhere safe to shoot, I might as well be shooting. That's just me...different strokes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BugDude View Post
    I still can't bring myself to do it. I guess having "don't touch the trigger unless you intend on firing the gun" beaten into my head repeatedly for years is just difficult to overcome at my age. It sounds good, and I understand it, but I just can't bring myself to sit around and watch TV pulling the trigger of a gun. And if I'm going somewhere safe to shoot, I might as well be shooting. That's just me...different strokes.
    With the sarcasm switch turned all the way off, that sounds rough.
    "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
    Tuco

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