What should I get?

This is a discussion on What should I get? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Being from Illinois, I'm going to be new to this whole CCW thing (assuming nothing bad happens)! The more research I do on good carry ...

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Thread: What should I get?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    What should I get?

    Being from Illinois, I'm going to be new to this whole CCW thing (assuming nothing bad happens)! The more research I do on good carry options the more that are added to my list. A few that really intrigue me include the G26, Sig P-250 subcompact, RAMI, PPS, XD subcompact, M&P Shield and the list goes on and on. I'm a small guy so I'm looking for something fairly small, but do not want a pocket pistol. I'd like to stick with 9mm, semiauto, preferably no external safety and would probably like striker over a hammer, but ultimately it wouldn't be a deal breaker. I would likely carry IWB at 4 or 5 o'clock. Any of the above options really stand out? Any others that I should give serious consideration? I'd like to try and narrow it down to a handful and then hit the local ranges to rent some out. Thanks for the help!

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    Member Array Randall757's Avatar
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    That Shield in 9mm and that glock 26 give you just about all you asked for. The Shield does have a safety but its not a problem. I have both the G26 and the shield . I'm a little guy 5'6" the shield fits the best with the glock a fat close second. The process of finding what you want should be fun. Good luck be safe.
    R

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    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    Randall, I'm also only 5'6" so it's good to hear your experience with these two. I've wanted a Glock for years but it has just never felt right in my hand. However, the couple times I've had a chance to shoot one I've shot them very well. So, I'm pretty torn. The Shield is completely foreign to me. I think I'll have to track one down to rent!

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    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
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    A friend I shoot with is about 5'4 and carries a 686 Smith. And carries and shoots it well.

    Your size shouldn't have a lot of bearing on your gun's size.

  6. #5
    StarPD45
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    Look around for some place that rents range guns, even if you have leave the state. You'll get a better idea of what you are comfortable with.
    And good luck getting concealed carry in IL. You know they will fight it tooth and nail.

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    New Member Array SigSaurP228's Avatar
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    Get what you shoot best and are most comfortable with. The most important thing is practice and training. I carried a G19 for years but as soon as I picked up an XD I was sold.

  8. #7
    Distinguished Member Array Spec's Avatar
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    Well Here is my input.... You will know my pick by the end of these three videos..

    Full Size Handgun Concealability - YouTube
    Concealed Carry for a Female - YouTube
    M&P Conversion - YouTube
    NRA Certified Rifle/Pistol Instructor
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G18CFw0lnD8

    Accuracy ALWAYS WINS! So carry what you can hit with.

    If you find yourself in a fair fight your tactics stink.

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    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by multistage View Post
    A friend I shoot with is about 5'4 and carries a 686 Smith. And carries and shoots it well.

    Your size shouldn't have a lot of bearing on your gun's size.
    If I were rich I would take a risk and go for a bit larger gun, but I don't have the means to try out different platforms. Whatever I get will probably be it for a while, so I want to make sure I get something that is unlikely as possible to make CC a pain for me. I want to make sure I carry whenever and wherever I can and I'm just nervous a larger gun would possibly prevent me from doing that. So, I'll start out small and gradually move up to that Desert Eagle down the road. ;)

  10. #9
    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spec View Post
    Well Here is my input.... You will know my pick by the end of these three videos..

    Full Size Handgun Concealability - YouTube
    Concealed Carry for a Female - YouTube
    M&P Conversion - YouTube
    So, Glock? :). Thanks for the recommendation!

  11. #10
    Senior Member Array Warmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJC7 View Post
    If I were rich I would take a risk and go for a bit larger gun, but I don't have the means to try out different platforms. Whatever I get will probably be it for a while, so I want to make sure I get something that is unlikely as possible to make CC a pain for me. I want to make sure I carry whenever and wherever I can and I'm just nervous a larger gun would possibly prevent me from doing that. So, I'll start out small and gradually move up to that Desert Eagle down the road. ;)
    If you are serious about what you are saying here and want to carry IWB, your best bet would be the PPS mentioned in your first post. Thin is very important. Stay away from any of the double stacks starting out.
    I always aim for the right eye...and I never miss - Goldeneye

  12. #11
    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warmon View Post
    If you are serious about what you are saying here and want to carry IWB, your best bet would be the PPS mentioned in your first post. Thin is very important. Stay away from any of the double stacks starting out.
    I've read a few times in different places that the length of the grip can be just as important (if not more so) than the thickness. Any idea how the PPS compares to the G26? I would imagine the PPS is longer (taller?) but by how much?

  13. #12
    Senior Member Array Warmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJC7 View Post
    I've read a few times in different places that the length of the grip can be just as important (if not more so) than the thickness. Any idea how the PPS compares to the G26? I would imagine the PPS is longer (taller?) but by how much?
    Length of grip can be a factor in concealment and control. If you can't control it well because there is not enough there to get a pinky on it, a shorter grip isn't gonna do much for you other than being somewhat easier to conceal - and that depends a lot on your body and how you dress. The most important thing for you to figure out first is what will your body tolerate IWB. If you go with a thin single stack such as the PPS, your chances of success are much higher. Plus, the PPS has several mag options that change length of grip.

    This vid will help you.

    I always aim for the right eye...and I never miss - Goldeneye

  14. #13
    Member Array usmcj's Avatar
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    This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike.


    Get some basic training FIRST. At this point you need fundamentals, not run and gun, or force on force. Reputable instructors will provide a host of handguns and holsters for you to experience in class. That will give you some idea of where your preferences might lead you in handgun selection. Then.....


    Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion... again....get some training......proper shooting techniques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right. Most gun shops have a box of used holsters that you can experiment with after you've chosen what gun works best for you. There are many options for concealed/open carry.


    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.


    If you're buying a handgun for home protection, and you choose to NOT have it on your person, you should consider where in your home you might be if someone kicks the door in. I don't see a person in a position to be able to ask an intruder to "hang on a sec, while I get my gun"


    There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil...I've known more than a few gents who didn't care for the recoil of what's often called a "ladies gun"... just sayin....


    Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...


    Shoot Safely....
    NRA Life Member ... Marine Corps League Life Member
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  15. #14
    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warmon View Post
    Length of grip can be a factor in concealment and control. If you can't control it well because there is not enough there to get a pinky on it, a shorter grip isn't gonna do much for you other than being somewhat easier to conceal - and that depends a lot on your body and how you dress. The most important thing for you to figure out first is what will your body tolerate IWB. If you go with a thin single stack such as the PPS, your chances of success are much higher. Plus, the PPS has several mag options that change length of grip.

    This vid will help you.

    Great video, Warmon. Thanks. I especially liked the side-by-side comparison of the guns. Mainly the Glock compared to the Walther. The Walther makes that Glock look like a brick!

    Quote Originally Posted by usmcj View Post
    This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike.


    Get some basic training FIRST. At this point you need fundamentals, not run and gun, or force on force. Reputable instructors will provide a host of handguns and holsters for you to experience in class. That will give you some idea of where your preferences might lead you in handgun selection. Then.....


    Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion... again....get some training......proper shooting techniques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right. Most gun shops have a box of used holsters that you can experiment with after you've chosen what gun works best for you. There are many options for concealed/open carry.


    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.


    If you're buying a handgun for home protection, and you choose to NOT have it on your person, you should consider where in your home you might be if someone kicks the door in. I don't see a person in a position to be able to ask an intruder to "hang on a sec, while I get my gun"


    There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil...I've known more than a few gents who didn't care for the recoil of what's often called a "ladies gun"... just sayin....


    Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...


    Shoot Safely....
    Great post! Thanks for the input. I was a cop in the Air Force for 4 years so I do have a solid foundation to build on, but because of that I hadn't really thought about further training before getting a CCW (other than what may be required). Will have to look into that.

    As far as the feel of a firearm in my hand, I completely agree. When I was SF, I loved the feel of my M9 and wanted to shoot it all the time. Unfortunately, I wasn't allowed to. lol Same goes for the P95 I currently own. But, of course, those are both larger pistols that fill out my hand more than most of the pistols I'll likely entertain for CC. I have yet to get to a store and hold/shoot several guns, but that is definitely in the plan prior to purchasing.

    The idea of carrying while inside my home has crossed my mind before. I've never done it, but I think it's time for me to seriously consider that again.

  16. #15
    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    Alright. For various reasons I have reduced my possibility list to the following five pistols:

    GLOCK 26
    Ruger LC9
    S&W M&P Shield
    SIG P-250 sc
    Walther PPS

    Since I've already received comments on some of these my main question is, are there any that stand out as having had reliability issues in the past/recently? Specifically, I've seen very mixed feelings on the P-250, but fairly consistent praise for the others. Has SIG gotten past the P-250 issues and have any of the others suffered from anything?

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