"Melting" a stainless frame?

"Melting" a stainless frame?

This is a discussion on "Melting" a stainless frame? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I have a Walther/S&W PPK/S that has very sharp frame edges. Does anyone know of a smith or custom house that can "melt" the edges ...

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Thread: "Melting" a stainless frame?

  1. #1
    Member Array HiWayMan's Avatar
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    "Melting" a stainless frame?

    I have a Walther/S&W PPK/S that has very sharp frame edges.

    Does anyone know of a smith or custom house that can "melt" the edges for a smoother feel?

    I know NAA offers it on their Guardians, but who else can do it?


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array pogo2's Avatar
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    Dehorning sharp edges for carry

    Most gunsmiths will do this work, which is not complicated on a stainless gun. For example, Wilson Combat in Arkansas shows this as an available service on their price list, at a price of $40:

    Wilson Combat custom price list in Acrobat format

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    VIP Member Array Rob72's Avatar
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    Yeah, I would be wary of letting a local guy do that, unless you really knew his work and capabilities. Not hard, but can have disasterous results, if not done with some basic care (ie, don't just slap it on the belt grinder! ).

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    Member Array HiWayMan's Avatar
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    Just got off the phone with Wilson. They don't work on the Walther/S&W in their shop, but Steve Kelley (the guy who does their dehorning work) has his own shop, Ozark Outfitters, and can probably do it on his own time.

    Just gotta call and get a price.

    Keep the names coming though as I would like to comparision shop a little.

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    Member Array progun47's Avatar
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    Try Clark custom guns, he's in La. and does great work. I had him do a custom job on a colt and it is great. Just google him, I don't have his web site of hand
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    With a fine stone, plenty of 600 grit and finer - it is IMO perfectly feasable to do for oneself.

    It takes time - lots of time and of course metal removed cannot be put back!

    Thing is - even the smallest of smoothings on some seemingly sharp corners can have excellent benefits - hard to even see much has been done. Not for the faint hearted perhaps but - neither is it impossible.
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    Member Array HiWayMan's Avatar
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    Well I have considered doing it myself, and I think I would be fine on all the areas except the "beaver tail" area. This is really the critical spot anyway, but the entire gun could used serious dehorning. I don't know what was being thought of during design, but ergonomics sure as hell wasn't it.



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    VIP Member Array CLASS3NH's Avatar
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    Chris is right, you can do it youself, with lots of time and paitents. The slide and frame are heat treated, so it's going to take some time to acomplish your mission. Plus you'll get it done, the way YOU want it. it doesn't take much to de-horn the gun, and break the edges so that it comes out of the holster in a smooth manner. Too much dehorning will make the gun look bad. I'd say to break the edges with no more than a .030 dia radius, as it's a small frame/slide gun..
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    Lew
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    I agree with Chris. You can do this your self, if you have patience. If you can take your time, it is simple enough to do. If you initally lack confidence, try rounding an edge on a non gun, like cheap silverware, or a elcheapo knife blade. Nothing like a practice run to build confidence. Plus you get to refine your technique before it gets expensive.
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    VIP Member Array pogo2's Avatar
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    Factory melt jobs

    Speaking of "melting" the sharp edges on a gun reminded me that some gun manufacturers are now offering new guns from the factory with a "meltdown" treatment. The Kimber CDP 1911 guns may have been the first of this type, and now Sig is offering this in their "SAS" guns, like this P229 SAS shown below:



    I think this is a great idea in a carry gun. I have a Kimber CDP Pro that is as smooth as a used bar of soap and just glides into the holster.

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    Melt jobs are nice.............maybe some day I will do my 1911.
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    Quote Originally Posted by P95Carry View Post
    With a fine stone, plenty of 600 grit and finer - it is IMO perfectly feasable to do for oneself.

    It takes time - lots of time and of course metal removed cannot be put back!

    Thing is - even the smallest of smoothings on some seemingly sharp corners can have excellent benefits - hard to even see much has been done. Not for the faint hearted perhaps but - neither is it impossible.
    P95 is correct. It is a very simple job to do. I used 400 grit tape on a stainless NRM 1991 and Ruger SP-101 to take off the sharp edges and a Dremel and 400 grit tape for an extreme carry melt job on a Kel-Tec P-11. The great thing about stainless is you don't need to refinish it after you're done.

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