Feel or accuracy more important?

Feel or accuracy more important?

This is a discussion on Feel or accuracy more important? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I often see people talk about how important it is to get a gun that feels right in your hand because you'll likely shoot better ...

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Thread: Feel or accuracy more important?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    Feel or accuracy more important?

    I often see people talk about how important it is to get a gun that feels right in your hand because you'll likely shoot better with it and want to shoot it more often because it's fun/comfortable to shoot. As I continue to narrow down my choices for a CC I always have the G26 on my mind. I love the durability and accuracy I've always read about in the Glock brand. The couple times I've had a chance to fire a Glock (although a G17 and G19) they never felt "right", but I've shot them very well. So, my questions are, how many of you have purchased a pistol due to its accuracy despite it not feeling right? Has the feel of that pistol grown on you? If not, is the enjoyment of firing it accurately enough to make you continue taking it to the range? Do the Gen 4 backstraps on the Glocks drastically effect the feel or do they not overcome the unique grip angle of the Glocks? Would after market grips help the grip angle at all? Sorry, lots of supplemental questions, but really don't want to undergo buyer's remorse if I can help it. Thanks!
    ”One loves to possess arms, though they hope never to have occasion for them.”
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  2. #2
    Member Array Clodbert's Avatar
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    The end result is accuracy while "feel" is the process to achieve the end result of accuracy. I'd go with the gun you shoot more accurately because, at the end of the day, that's what matters most. My two cents.
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Feel good is for your favorite recliner. Pick one you have confidence in and shoot well.
    Caskets look comfortable too, but I sure don't want to lay in one because I chose a comfortable gun and couldn't hit a threat to my life.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

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    Quite often "feel" is just plain wrong. Really, if one is new to shooting, what are they trying to "feel"? How does that person know what "feel" is the "feel" of a good gun?

    As with so many things in life, RESULTS are what matters most. Accuracy trumps "feel" all day long.
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  5. #5
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    I concur with the previous two. Any of the reputable brands will shoot better than you or I will ever be able too. But, the "feel" is an often used term by those simply parroting what they've been told. Look at balance, low bore axis, local product support are all important factors over "feels good in hand"

    A good gun will become second nature soon enough.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array aus71383's Avatar
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    Feel is nice. I have guns that feel great. I suggest you get the Glock 26. With practice and familiarity, it will become normal, and it will "feel" fine.

    Austin

  7. #7
    Member Array rmarino14's Avatar
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    If a gun doesn't fit your hand then the "feel" of the gun is wrong for that person. So IMO both feel and accuracy are important.
    minimalbrat likes this.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array DJC7's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the input. Any input on how the Gen 4 backstraps or after market grips might help the grip angle?
    ”One loves to possess arms, though they hope never to have occasion for them.”
    ~Thomas Jefferson


    "Carry your gun - it's a lighter burden than regret."
    ~Breda

  9. #9
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    I have found that guns that "Feel" right to me are the guns with which I am most accurate *OUT OF THE BOX*. The guns that don't "Feel" right to me are the guns with which I am the least accurate out of the box.

    For me, a gun does not feel right when, e.g.,

    - the finger grooves do not match my hand;
    - the swell is misplaced within my hand
    - the length of pull is waaaaay to short
    - etc.

    I suppose if I practiced enough I would overcome the "feel." But there are so many pistols to choose from, so why not go with one that "feels" good out of the box and with which I can naturally point? It's one less thing that I need to overcome when training, and I'm not a professional shooter or in a profession in which I train with firearms.

    Glocks are an example. I really want a Glock. I really, really do. But for some reason they just don't feel right for me. I'm sure with some practice I would be fine, but why bother?

    On the other hand, the first time I shot my CZ 75 PCR I emptied the entire magazine in the pie pan point shooting at 7 yards. And the CZ "Feels" right in my hand.

    On the third hand, if I were in a profession in which a gun was issued to me, and the gun didn't "feel" right, I'd practice until it didn't matter!
    Archie and ironmike86 like this.

  10. #10
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    The grip angle will stay about the same. The backstrap adds thickness only at the back. M&P (except the Shield will add thickness to the back & palm. There are also slip-on gloves that you can try. I don't think the effective grip angle will be an different but your hands might be positioned slightly different & that might make the difference. If you were to put a couple of hundred (thousand?) rounds through it you'll get used to it & it'll feel "good" unless the feel is completely intolerable to you. If it never feels good to you yet you're consistently accurate with it then deal with it. In an ideal world feel & accuracy will be found on the same gun.

    Now to me Glock has about the most uncomfortable feel to it. I had a Gen 2 without the interchangeable backstraps. I still loved the gun & shot very well with it. After awhile It didn't bother me much. M&P40C feels about as good as any I've shot with a medium palm grip installed.
    Glenn

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  11. #11
    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    The Glock 19 (lil sister G26), is probably THE most relieable and favored weapon for carry. Much ado is made by many concerning grip angle...shoot the weapon...the angle is fine!!! Same with feel...shoot the weapon...if you are accurate and happy with the results, feel will come!!! JMO
    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array GentlemanJim's Avatar
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    The ONLY thing that matters is hits on target.

    Everything else is fluff.

    Jim
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  13. #13
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    I will readily admit both my S&W 4566 and 6906 "feel" better in hand and point more naturally. But I shoot my Brickish Glock 30 just as well (or better). I do find the G22 in the smallest size (no backstrap) fits my hand better than a Gen 3 does.

    I'll take accuracy over feel. To me, it's no big deal.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array DaGunny's Avatar
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    In the Corps, we had to shoot "requal" 1911s. They were all beat-to-hell, rattled, had bent sights, unaligned sights, just plain nasty. The first day of firing was just to learn how to shoot THAT weapon. One year I had to "aim" at 1 o'clock in the 3 ring to hit the X in the Bullseye. Somehow, I always shot Expert.

    You can learn how to shoot well with any weapon...so you might as well use one that's comfortable in your hand.
    Beans likes this.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member Array sensei2's Avatar
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    as RoadRunner71 perceptively said, "feel" only matters when you have some basis of knowledge to work from.

    do you think a beginning bicycle racer could tell you which bike "feels" better and have that translate 100% or so into the best racing bike for him or her?

    would a beginning violinist be able to tell which of two or three similar violins "feels" best to him/her and so pick out the best fiddle?

    when you have shot many many different guns under different conditions, THEN your 'feel' MIGHT translate into good groups. in the meantime, trust your body.

    if you shoot a certain gun well, that's a gun which is right for you, even if your conscious mind thinks otherwise.

    besides, firing a handgun is a dynamic activity, not a static one. sights, recoil, trigger characteristics, bore axis - these and other factors play major roles in how a gun shoots FOR YOU.

    would you pick out a race car by sitting in it? or would you want to drive it around a track? and which would you choose - the one that felt best to you while you were sitting in it, or the one that got you the fastest lap times?
    Last edited by sensei2; January 1st, 2013 at 12:14 AM.
    First Sgt likes this.

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