Limp wrist malfunctions with Glock pistols

Limp wrist malfunctions with Glock pistols

This is a discussion on Limp wrist malfunctions with Glock pistols within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; There's a lot of information out there about what's commonly called "limp wrist malfunctions", some accurate and some not so accurate. As always I enjoy ...

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Thread: Limp wrist malfunctions with Glock pistols

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    Senior Member Array MilitaryArms's Avatar
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    Limp wrist malfunctions with Glock pistols

    There's a lot of information out there about what's commonly called "limp wrist malfunctions", some accurate and some not so accurate. As always I enjoy hearing your thoughts and experiences on the topic.

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    VIP Member Array pogo2's Avatar
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    Theory of limp wristing

    I believe that the cycling of any semi automatic handgun depends upon the frame being held firmly so that the slide can go back completely, fully compress the recoil spring, eject the empty casing and reload the chamber with the top round in the magazine. If the frame is not firmly held it will tend to move backwards from the force of recoil at the same time as the slide moves back, preventing the slide from cycling fully. The result can be the jam shown in the Glock of your picture.

    I think this problem is more pronounced in polymer frame guns because the frame is light weight and moves backwards more easily unless it is firmly held in the shooter's hand. A steel or aluminum frame has greater weight and more inertia to resist the slide's motion. So "limp wristing" is more pronounced in polymer guns.
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    Member Array MikeyF's Avatar
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    My wife used to be able to make any auto fail including Sig, Glock, and HK. I had her change her grip and that worked.

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    I can tell you from my experiences Ive had three operations on my shoulders an elbows an it left me weak in one arm I quit carrying my 1911 because I limp wristd a couple of times at the range. Just enough where I did not trust it in a emergency situation. But thats ok I love snubbies anyways now carry my SP101 an a few speed strips.

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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    I think it also depends on how stiff the recoil spring is heavier springs require more resistance to cycle the action whereby lighter springs may allow somebody to get by with some limp wristing
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    Senior Member Array MilitaryArms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pogo2 View Post
    I believe that the cycling of any semi automatic handgun depends upon the frame being held firmly so that the slide can go back completely, fully compress the recoil spring, eject the empty casing and reload the chamber with the top round in the magazine. If the frame is not firmly held it will tend to move backwards from the force of recoil at the same time as the slide moves back, preventing the slide from cycling fully. The result can be the jam shown in the Glock of your picture.

    I think this problem is more pronounced in polymer frame guns because the frame is light weight and moves backwards more easily unless it is firmly held in the shooter's hand. A steel or aluminum frame has greater weight and more inertia to resist the slide's motion. So "limp wristing" is more pronounced in polymer guns.
    Most any auto-loading handgun can experience such a failure, but as you note it's far more likely to occur with polymer framed pistols. The lighter the frame, the more likely it is to happen. The Glock happens to have one of the lightest frames of any polymer framed pistol on the market.
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    Senior Member Array MilitaryArms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dukalmighty View Post
    I think it also depends on how stiff the recoil spring is heavier springs require more resistance to cycle the action whereby lighter springs may allow somebody to get by with some limp wristing
    There are a number of variables, however the variable that contributes most to the issue is the weight of the frame I believe.
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    VIP Member Array NC Bullseye's Avatar
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    I'd be curious to know if using a "self defense" grade ammunition in +P would help decrease or eliminate the limp wrist effect on the G19. The greater force produced by the higher pressures may help overcome this.
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    I've had one (1) fail-to-feed in my Glock 30, and that was on the second mag I fired when new. Admittedly, I hadn't shot a semiauto in many years, and the Glock trigger caught me a bit by surprise as I was trying to steady the sights on target. My grip wasn't real firm at the time, and I blame that function failure entire on me, as I haven't had another since with either factory loads or reloads.

    I haven't found the Glock to need a cast-iron grip, and I've seen a video of a guy holding the grip between his finger and thumb and repeatedly firing the gun with no failures. So I guess that means it can happen, but it doesn't mean it will happen.
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    Senior Member Array RubenZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MilitaryArms View Post
    Most any auto-loading handgun can experience such a failure, but as you note it's far more likely to occur with polymer framed pistols. The lighter the frame, the more likely it is to happen. The Glock happens to have one of the lightest frames of any polymer framed pistol on the market.
    I don't buy that. With the vast majority of law enforcement and people in general using Polymer framed pistols you would see this more often if that were the case.
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    Senior Member Array MilitaryArms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubenZ View Post
    I don't buy that. With the vast majority of law enforcement and people in general using Polymer framed pistols you would see this more often if that were the case.
    It's actually quite common. Just because you personally don't hear about it doesn't mean it doesn't happen. I know this can be a tough pill to swallow for some polymer gun fans, but the fact remains it's not some mysterious phenomenon that's totally undocumented like Big Foot. There is ample evidence out there besides the clear examples shown in this video. Go read the comments on the video, you'll see plenty of people saying their wives, girlfriends, novice buddy, etc. had the exact same problem but when the pistol owner shoots the pistol it works fine. Talk to a training organization and they'll tell you they see the issue regularly.
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    Senior Member Array MilitaryArms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC Bullseye View Post
    I'd be curious to know if using a "self defense" grade ammunition in +P would help decrease or eliminate the limp wrist effect on the G19. The greater force produced by the higher pressures may help overcome this.
    In my experience, yes -- the ammo can make a difference. It might not completely eliminate the problem, but it can make it much less likely to happen. Nothing will replace having a positive grip on the pistol.
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    Member Array mdrums's Avatar
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    Great video with explanation! I haven't experienced a limp wrist with my Glocks, M&P, Sig's but now I understand better. thanks!

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    Senior Member Array wdbailey's Avatar
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    Back years ago I owned several Glocks including the G22 and the G17. I was suffering from tendonitis in my right elbow and my right thumb but it never occurred to me that the malfunctions I had with those pistols may have had something to do with those relatively minor injuries.

    I never had any issues at all with steel or alloy frame 1911's in .45 so stuck with those.

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    the only issue I've ever had from any of my Glocks was shooting my G36 weak hand. Had a few stovepipes due to limping it, and once I corrected that I had no problem.
    I think the G36 is more prone to the limp wristing issue than any other Glock. I can shoot my G19 with my big toe and it never fails to go bang.
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