Improvement made at the range today through training.

This is a discussion on Improvement made at the range today through training. within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; To that end I have been critical of my shooting. I made some nice progress today at the range. Perhaps it will help some here. ...

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Thread: Improvement made at the range today through training.

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    Member Array breakingcontact's Avatar
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    Improvement made at the range today through training.

    To that end I have been critical of my shooting.

    I made some nice progress today at the range. Perhaps it will help some here.

    Its all about the trigger reset. I've been able to shoot nice one ragged hole groups with the occasional pulled shot pretty consistently during slow controlled fire. However, while shooting IDPA where accuracy AND speed are valued, my groups opened up unacceptably.

    So I examined what I was doing wrong. I had a decent stance, good sight picture and trigger press, good hand positioning. So what the heck was I doing wrong?

    It may be no revelation to those of you with more experience and I'm sure some of you could produce better results. Way too many people in my opinion go to the range and just blast away and think they are good or shoot slow and produce good groups and are happy like I was doing previously. Me examining myself and being around better shooters which impressed me drove me to want to do better.

    Here it is: I wasn't using the trigger reset. I knew about it. Heard about it. But didn't understand why people cared...until I tried to shoot fast. I improved my grip pressure on the gun, already had good positioning. But I think this may have came from my primary improvement: riding the trigger out just to the reset. Instead of all the way out. This allowed me to be ready to press again as soon as my sight picture came back after recoil. Not having to take up the slack in the trigger until the break made a huge difference and I think even allowed me to grip the gun tighter.

    At 7 yards I was able to draw fast, fire a mag, fast, reload fast and fire another mag fast, into about a 4" group. Very happy and looking to keep improving.
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    VIP Member Array sixgun's Avatar
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    It helps to learn new tricks. Sometimes when I shoot I end up trying to go way to fast. So I slow down some watch my trigger control and front sight. And i shoot better. Ive heard this somewhere else. Shoot as fast as you can but as slow as you must.
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    Member Array breakingcontact's Avatar
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    Re: Improvement made at the range today through training.

    That makes sense. After I can maintain the speed/accuracy I attained today I need to start working on 1 hand shooting right and left. I can do it now to a decent degree but not as well as I'd like especially w the weak hand. Again its these things that just don't come out blast away at the range or even shooting nice tight groups slowly. IDPA is causing me to push myself and before anyone gets it twisted. I know IDPA is a game and they can encourage some questionable tactics. But it has caused me to challenge what I'm doing in my training and that has brought me improvements.

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    Member Array GunsAndViolince's Avatar
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    Breakingcontact, your post scares me and here's why:

    I've always had a talent with firearms, even before I had a lot of my own and was just shooting with friends. I shot, I dunno, probably a bazillion BBs and pellets through my Crossman as a kid and developed some ability perhaps. There was a period where I was busy with other things but whenever I got back into it, things always came back to me.

    So now, I'm doing the same kind of IDPA stuff you are describing except I'm just doing it, not thinking about it too much. Example: at a training match a while back I double-tapped a swinging target in a way that seemed to impress the whole room and I have exactly zero ideas on how I did it. No frickin' clue. And I can do that sort of thing fairly consistently, but not TRULY consistently and not as fast as I should.

    So, I know to develop REAL consistency, accuracy and speed, I'm going have to really examine my technique as you are suggesting but I'm really worried that I'm going to overthink it and become paralyzed. However, maybe once that happens I'll rebuild with a stronger foundation. I have to remind myself that adults and kids learn really differently and as adults, we often have to really understand something before we can teach ourselves to do it. As kids, we just imitate and do and pick things up quickly.

    We did a little drill (probably not IDPA approved) a couple weeks back that you might like. It was at just 2 or 3 yards I think. We put 6 rounds on target, had to reload and then fire the next 6. All with blacked-out goggles on. The scenario is that the bad guy appears in the doorway of the room you are in and flicks off the light (not sure why we needed so many rounds but hey whatever, I show up at these things to shoot!). Anyway, it's amazing how tricky that can be if you haven't figured out what your feet are doing. I like the Weaver stance as it is a lot like the way I play the violin and I did pretty well with this drill (only 3 down) but I'm gonna have to start backing it up to 5, 7 and 10 yards and see how it goes (with supervision of course!).


    Anyway, I'll have to examine my double-taps and see what I'm doing. My gut says maybe I'm keeping a bit of positive pressure on the trigger as it's recovering to feel when to go again, but I don't really know. I just hope after I start really examining this I'll still be able to shoot!

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    Having someone video record you during a match or practice is helpful, too. Every time my shooting partner records me at Tuesday Night Steel, I find something I can improve on.
    Smitty
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    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
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    Every once in awhile I find myself overthinking things. A very experienced shooter told me, "Sometimes, you just gotta let her buck."

    Takes the pressure off. Groups shrink quickly. Fun is had.

    I do agree that riding the reset speeds things up.

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    Distinguished Member Array Hoganbeg's Avatar
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    Congratulations on your cognition! It is very much like playing violin. It's all about technique and self-analysis. First, understand exactly what it is you are trying to do, then find the weak points and correct them one at a time. Then groove it into muscle memory.

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    Member Array breakingcontact's Avatar
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    Breakingcontact, your post scares me and here's why:

    Anyway, I'll have to examine my double-taps and see what I'm doing. My gut says maybe I'm keeping a bit of positive pressure on the trigger as it's recovering to feel when to go again, but I don't really know. I just hope after I start really examining this I'll still be able to shoot!
    I got my flame suit on when I read the first line. Your phrase "positive pressure on the trigger" is exactly what I experienced today. Instead of just letting out on the trigger, I rode it out, felt the reset and stopped there. Glad to see you're making progress and it's good to hear from others experiences.

    Congratulations on your cognition! It is very much like playing violin. It's all about technique and self-analysis. First, understand exactly what it is you are trying to do, then find the weak points and correct them one at a time. Then groove it into muscle memory.
    My shooting partner and I were comparing it to golf today. It's fun and frustrating at the same time.

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    Member Array GunsAndViolince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by breakingcontact View Post

    My shooting partner and I were comparing it to golf today. It's fun and frustrating at the same time.
    Ha! That's so true! I didn't think there was any human activity as annoyingly difficult to perfect as bowing a string instrument until I tried golf! Good luck!

    Cheers,

    Gav

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