Cleaning new gun from the box

Cleaning new gun from the box

This is a discussion on Cleaning new gun from the box within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I'm sure some of you have come across this at one point or another. Why can't most manufacturers seem to get this right? When purchasing ...

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    Member Array woodrow's Avatar
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    Cleaning new gun from the box

    I'm sure some of you have come across this at one point or another. Why can't most manufacturers seem to get this right? When purchasing a new gun, I usually find it to be excessively oiled/greased, typically requiring an immediate cleaning. Does anyone else feel it is necessary to clean a gun right after purchasing it? Maybe it's just a habit of mine and I want the gun cleaned and oiled to my liking. I appreciate and understand that manufacturers want to keep their product in a protected condition until it's purchased, but it seems to be overkill. I shouldn't feel like I'm trying to grab a greased pig when I hold my gun for the first time.
    Last edited by woodrow; May 21st, 2013 at 07:43 PM.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodrow View Post
    Does anyone else feel it is necessary to clean a gun right after purchasing it? Maybe it's just a habit of mine and I want the gun cleaned and oiled to my liking.
    Those who feel it isn't necessary probably have never acquired an older "classic" rifle packed in cosmoline. That isn't to say that every gun is that way. Far from it. But, the point is that (IMO) you don't really know what you've got and whether it's ready to fire until it's gone over.

    Yes, I feel it's necessary to clean every gun prior to shooting it for the first time. At minimum, it allows me to ensure the gun is at a known baseline before sending something down the pipe. Performing an initial cleaning and lubrication allows me to check for obstructions, check the basic function and operation, confirm everything seems to be working right, including cycling a few rounds through ... all before firing the gun for the first time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Yes, I feel it's necessary to clean every gun prior to shooting it for the first time. At minimum, it allows me to ensure the gun is at a known baseline before sending something down the pipe. Performing an initial cleaning and lubrication allows me to check for obstructions, check the basic function and operation, confirm everything seems to be working right, including cycling a few rounds through ... all before firing the gun for the first time.


    ^This. Plus:

    Many come absolutely soaked in oil, inside and out. A gun ain't no good if you can't hold on to the dang thing.

    So I spray 'em down with gun scrubber, lube 'em, and good to go...

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    Member Array GunTrooper's Avatar
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    I usually clean a gun prior to shooting it too, because I remember being in the Army and getting a brand new M16A2 that was pretty packed with waxy, greasy cosmoline. They were packed that way to inhibit/prevent rust during long term storage in possibly humid dank conditions.

    Modern guns probably would be ok to shoot straight out of the box; in fact I have been told that the bronze colored substance on the slide rails of Glocks is a special lubricant that should be left on for the first 300-400 rounds (break-in period...)

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    Distinguished Member Array phreddy's Avatar
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    I like to take them apart and see what they are all about before shooting them. Cleaning them up doesn't take that much more time especially since they only have a round or two through them.
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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    Good way to learn how to field strip your weapon, as well.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xader View Post
    Many come absolutely soaked in oil, inside and out. A gun ain't no good if you can't hold on to the dang thing.

    So I spray 'em down with gun scrubber, lube 'em, and good to go...
    Yup. The CZ P-01 is like that, all dripping from the bag full of Dippity-Do (or whatever they goop all over the gun). Can't exactly fire a weapon like that, if you can't properly hold onto it. Not exactly cosmoline, but equally questionable as an operable, shootable weapon.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
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    Gun manufacturers have no idea how long their product will set in some warehouse, or the climatic conditions it will be stored in until sold. The last thing they want are calls about rust on a newly purchased gun.
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    VIP Member Array Taurahe's Avatar
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    the manufacturers pack them woith oil to inhibit rust they do not know how long they will sit on a shelf. Also, a full strip down helps you learn how disassemble and reassemble your weapon. Besides,,, who wants that yucky lube they use anyway?
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    Member Array PhilG's Avatar
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    I had one student bring a new Kel-Tec P11 to the range recently. The thing was as dry as a bone, no lube or oil of any kind. Good thing we looked at it before we got started, I would say it would not have cycled at all. In a few words check it before you try it.

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    VIP Member Array Stevew's Avatar
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    I field strip. Run a patch down the barrel and lube the rails.
    Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around laws. Plato

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    Member Array BigPony's Avatar
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    Yupp.. I always clean mine before first time firing. Talk about a weapon being packed in cosmoline try getting a Mosin Nagant ;) That puts a whole new spin on the term packed in cosmoline.

    Also, whoever posted about the gold stuff on the rails of the glock should be left there? First I ever heard of that, and I have always cleaned that stuff away on my Glocks :/ It is not in the manual either I do not believe.

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    Distinguished Member Array miller_man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Yup. The CZ P-01 is like that, all dripping from the bag full of Dippity-Do (or whatever they goop all over the gun). Can't exactly fire a weapon like that, if you can't properly hold onto it. Not exactly cosmoline, but equally questionable as an operable, shootable weapon.
    I had read that the CZ's came really greasy, MAN! they weren't kidding, my P-01 looked like it came out of the bottom of an oil drum.

    I agree, I clean/inspect em out of the box before shooting as well. Although buying new guns is not my first choice any more, still with buying a used one it's the same thing - strip, clean, check then shoot.
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    VIP Member Array JoJoGunn's Avatar
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    I have and have not cleaned a new firearm prior to shooting it and that depended upon the condition of it as it came out of the box.

    My older (now stolen) handguns I never cleaned, just took out of the box and fired rounds. The S&W 39-2 9mm was lightly lubed as I recall (got it in 1981) and it up until it was taken never ever jammed or failed to feed or eject. I really miss that gun.

    My recently purchased Taurus PT 709 Slim was taken out of the box, stripped and was thoroughly inspected prior to going to the range. Not because I did not trust it, as a precaution just in case there was anything obstructing the feed ramp or barrel. It was not greasy or covered with lube and when I fired it at the range, it ate good and cheap ammo like candy.

    If cleaning a new firearm makes you feel better, then go for it. Can't hurt and some preventive stuff is better to do in case the firearm doesn't function and you have to use it in a self-defense situation.
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    Member Array bodhisatva's Avatar
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    A buddy of mine and I bought the same pistol (Beretta PX4) about the same time. I took mine home, stripped, cleaned and lubed it. He took his straight to the range. He had 5 or 6 FTFs on the first mag. I have put over 2000 rounds through mine with nary a hiccup. After he cleaned his, he has not had one problem. For me, I will never shoot a gun that I didn't tear down, clean and INSPECT myself. Just my humble opinion.
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