Striker-fired in AIWB?

This is a discussion on Striker-fired in AIWB? within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Mostly a wheel-gun guy, so please help me out as I'm considering a pistol. I've read general comments that a striker-fired pistol isn't a good ...

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Thread: Striker-fired in AIWB?

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    New Member Array Normandie3's Avatar
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    Question Striker-fired in AIWB?

    Mostly a wheel-gun guy, so please help me out as I'm considering a pistol. I've read general comments that a striker-fired pistol isn't a good mix with AIWB. Is the issue with reholstering safely, or are there innate dangers in merely carrying this way?

    Thanks

    Bob

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    I don't know where you are reading these comments, but AIWB is perfectly safe if you are a careful individual and you always observe safe firearm handling rules. Plenty of people carry a safetyless striker fired pistol AIWB, including myself.

    There's tons of discussions that pop up quite regularly on here. Do a search for AIWB and you'll get all sorts of opinions on it. Just remember, nobody's opinion is more important to you than your own. If you aren't comfortable with the idea of AIWB, or you are concerned that you just might not safely reholster every single time, then you should follow your intuition and go with what's safe for you.
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    Member Array Mxfreak_24's Avatar
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    Where did you read these comments if you don't mind me asking?

    Appendix carry is a no more inherently dangerous form of carry than any other manor provided you demonstrate basic firearm handling and safety along with a quality holster.

    I carry a Glock 22 in a Raven Concealment Vanguard and have no issues. My buddy is the one that presented this form of carry to me and at first I was a little leery about it, but it is now my preferred method of carry. Like the majority of things firearm related, it's a fear of the unknown when first trying it.

    Be smart about it.
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    VIP Member Array smolck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX expat View Post
    if you are a careful individual and you always observe safe firearm handling rules.
    I am a simpleton, but rule #2 says "Never Point The Gun At Something You Are Not Prepared To Destroy". Does this apply to a holstered firearm or not? If it does, then AIWB carry is in direct violation of it, especially when sitting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by smolck View Post
    I am a simpleton, but rule #2 says "Never Point The Gun At Something You Are Not Prepared To Destroy". Does this apply to a holstered firearm or not? If it does, then AIWB carry is in direct violation of it, especially when sitting.
    A holstered gun isn't being handled or actively pointed and it isn't going to fire itself if it's secured in properly made holster.
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    VIP Member Array Brad426's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX expat View Post
    A holstered gun isn't being handled or actively pointed and it isn't going to fire itself if it's secured in properly made holster.
    It's still a gun pointed at your junk... that's a tough mental hurdle for some of us to jump even though logically I know you're right.
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    Member Array ZeBool's Avatar
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    Reholstering a gun in an appendix holster is no different than reholstering a gun carried on your hip. Keep your finger indexed along the frame, make sure nothing is in the holster, and reholster reluctantly. The gun is not going to spontaneously fire in a good holster that covers the trigger guard, or any other time for that matter unless the trigger is pulled.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX expat View Post
    A holstered gun isn't being handled or actively pointed and it isn't going to fire itself if it's secured in properly made holster.
    My concerns center more around holstering and drawing the gun than carrying while holstered. Lots of people who are much more experienced than me carry regularly in that fashion, but I don't.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad426 View Post
    It's still a gun pointed at your junk... that's a tough mental hurdle for some of us to jump even though logically I know you're right.
    Oh, I agree. And that's exactly why I said that you have to listen to your gut (or what's below it ) and do what's comfortable for you as an individual.

    I know I've brought this up before but I started out carrying, many years ago, with an officer's sized .45 in a Thunder Belt/ Smart Carry belt. That took a whole lot to get comfortable with. Safety or no, the thought of that thing sitting cocked in that location, wasn't exactly an easy thing, especially since that was my first foray into concealed weapons! I carried that way for years though and understanding the mechanics of modern striker fired weapons makes it no more likely that they will discharge unintentionally than anything else.
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    VIP Member Array smolck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX expat View Post
    A holstered gun isn't being handled or actively pointed and it isn't going to fire itself if it's secured in properly made holster.
    I have seen and heard of ND's happening regardless so "isn't going to fire itself" doesn't matter to me. Plenty of guys have torched off a round by accident either when drawing or reholstering. If I had that happen, it MIGHT graze my butt. If an appendix carrier does, it's likely a femoral artery and rather swift death.

    I understand the merits of appendix carry, but I will not break rule #2 holstered or not.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1956 View Post
    My concerns center more around holstering and drawing the gun than carrying while holstered. Lots of people who are much more experienced than me carry regularly in that fashion, but I don't.
    I'll say this, on the holstering part. I almost always holster the firearm with a slight outward pivot of my wrist, so if an AD were to occur, I do believe that it would actually miss my body entirely. Drawing is fairly similar, because my trigger finger is riding above the trigger area as I start to draw and I'm applying the same pivoting pressure, which pushes the barrel forward and away from by body the moment it clears the holster. Very similar to how combat pistol classes will teach you to pull the gun out with a pivot so the front end of your weapon is being pushed forward when it clears the holster.
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    New Member Array Normandie3's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=TX expat;2810869.
    There's tons of discussions that pop up quite regularly on here. Do a search for AIWB and you'll get all sorts of opinions on it. .[/QUOTE]

    Yep, any search engine will provide a number of hits on this subject.....and will include good as well as poor advice and I'm trying to sort out which is which. I don't bookmark each of my searches, but suffice it to say there are many opinions on this subject outside of DC. You need to "get out more"

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    Distinguished Member Array tcox4freedom's Avatar
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    When I read posts about the dangers of holstering & drawing from people, I wonder how much drawing & holstering the person actually plans on doing. Depending on the holster I use, the gun remains inside the holster 24/7. The only time I remove my firearm from it's holster is to change holsters, clean it or practice. I usually place the gun & holster into place at the same time as a single unit. (This is extremely easy to do with AIWB.)

    If you are involved in a SD situation and forced to draw your firearm, it should remain out & ready until the danger is COMPLETELY over. Once the danger is over, you should be able to secure/holster your firearm in a very safe manner. If you have a good quality, rigid holster, you should be able to holster safely without incident. But, if you use a nylon or pocket holster, take the holster out, re-holster your firearm and safely reposition everything like you did when you got dressed.


    IMHO; if you're overly concerned about having to re-holster you may be "playing" with your firearm a little too much. (Leave you gun alone unless you are cleaning or practicing.)


    -
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcox4freedom View Post
    When I read posts about the dangers of holstering & drawing from people, I wonder how much drawing & holstering the person actually plans on doing. Depending on the holster I use, the gun remains inside the holster 24/7. The only time I remove my firearm from it's holster is to change holsters, clean it or practice. I usually place the gun & holster into place at the same time as a single unit.

    If you are involved in a SD situation and forced to draw your firearm, it should remain out & ready until the danger is COMPLETELY over. Once the danger is over, you should be able to secure/holster your firearm in a very safe manner. If you have a good quality, rigid holster, you should be able to holster safely without incident. But, if you use a nylon or pocket holster, take the holster out, re-holster your firearm and safely reposition everything like you did when you got dressed.


    IMHO; if you're overly concerned about having to re-holster you may be "playing" with your firearm a little too much. (Leave you gun alone unless you are cleaning or practicing.)


    -
    I practice holstering and drawing hot thousands of times/year. Just sayin'.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Normandie3 View Post
    Yep, any search engine will provide a number of hits on this subject.....and will include good as well as poor advice and I'm trying to sort out which is which. I don't bookmark each of my searches, but suffice it to say there are many opinions on this subject outside of DC. You need to "get out more"
    I was actually referring to doing an internal search of DC, which will get you the same advice that you're going to get if we type it out again; which I'm happy to do, but not everyone will, so you'll probably end up with more information by checking out all of our previous discussions on this same subject.
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