Getting a Gun Wet

This is a discussion on Getting a Gun Wet within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Recently it has come into my consideration the implications of routinely exposing a gun to water, specifically chlorinated (pool) water in addition to sweat, sunscreen, ...

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  1. #1
    Ex Member Array MJB_17's Avatar
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    Getting a Gun Wet

    Recently it has come into my consideration the implications of routinely exposing a gun to water, specifically chlorinated (pool) water in addition to sweat, sunscreen, general wear etc. and the long term effects it will have on a gun. This time of year, I spend a lot of time in and around pools, since I already have the granite chiseled physique of Adonis, I must have the the golden amber skin tone to match. As a result, my CCW often gets exposed to all of those things I mentioned, whether I want to or not.

    Currently, I have been using my smallest gun, Glock 27, as what I take with me when I am dressed in my lightest clothing (I don't take it in the water, but it still gets wet just being around water) but due to it's size I have been looking at getting an LCP for pocket holster use.

    I know there is nothing good about exposing a gun and ammo to water etc., but how big is the risk of rust and malfunction of a recently produced good quality weapon exposed to these kinds of conditions? While we're at it, tell me about the LCP and why I should or shouldn't buy one as a pocket holster carry/ deep concealment option.

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  3. #2
    Ex Member Array IndianaSig's Avatar
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    Any gun that is routinely exposed to moisture/humidity will rust. You can mitigate the progress by using lubrication products designed to drive out moisture but they won't prevent eventual rust. There is definitely a difference between rust and malfunction. I have a couple of guns I can think of right now with some small rust spots on them but I'm also sure they are 100% reliable. Routine cleaning and lube will go a long way towards keeping any rust to a minimum. As for your Glock 27 vs. a LCP? My preference would be to keep the 27 but only because I have one and it is as reliable a gun as I've ever owned. Never shot, or even held, a LCP.

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    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    On another gun forum we had someone describe similar problems with his glock 19. He seemed to be under the impression that "glocks didnt rust", and his was rusted up pretty good.

    Well we were all trying to figure it out, when he posts that he thinks he has figured it out. That he goes swimming several times a week, and throws his wet clothes in the bag where his gun is.

    To make it clear: You still need to "oil" your guns. Rem Oil, or CLP, whatever, but especially if they are in contact with water, and/or corrosive substances, you need to protect them with "oil".

    To protect against rusting from water, I actually like Rem Oil.

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    I carry a CW9 when I walk the pups. Here in AZ, that means 85F or hotter at 5:30 am... so after a 45 minute walk, I'm soaked in sweat.

    A couple of summers ago I discovered the error of my ways with surface pitting on the gun's barrel (exterior... around the chamber and slide stop lug). Nothing structural, but a wake-up call... clearly, my salty sweat was migrating to susceptible parts. Chlorinated pool water will have the same effect, as both sweat and chlorine create corrosive salts which attack ferrous alloys, including "stainless" steel.

    Bottom line is that given the combined environment of moisture and heat in the presence of elements (sodium and chlorine, for example) that will easily form corrosive salts, a little more care is required. When I get back from my sweaty morning dog walk I use canned air (Dust Off) to blow dry my sweaty piece, and about once a week I strip it down and smear oil on the exposed parts. This has worked for a couple of years now, so I'm satisfied I'm paying enough attention to the situation.
    srings, rocky, pgrass101 and 2 others like this.
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    Member Array ejes's Avatar
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    I prefer Eezox. It isn't the absolute, end-all / be-all, very best at either rust prevention or lubrication, but it does do both very, very well imo. With proper, regular maintenance, it has never left me down. If I'm in particularly wet, moist or sweat inducing environment, I will wipe down daily as common sense dictates.

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    New Member Array stonemadman's Avatar
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    Since I live in the wonderful state of Oklahoma, where summers are routinely over 100 degrees, I sweat all over my pistol. Does everyone else here wear an undershirt of some sort during the hot months?
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    VIP Member Array Snub44's Avatar
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    ...I buy nothing but stainless...and they rust...sweat, chlorine,salt, and other things attack even stainless...I have to clean mine weekly and brush out the rust...not a lot...but enough to matter...and my rear sight on my Ruger .45 rusts quickly...it's not stainless...I've gone from RemOil, which dries out fast, to Marvel Mystery Oil...some folks use wax furniture polish...but every gun needs regular TLC...
    ...I am often soaking wet with sweat...and water when I pressure wash something...so I start with stainless and pay attention often...

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    WD40 stands for the fortieth attempt at water displacement. I use an air hose and blow the parts of the gun down.
    Wd40 to start off if I find myself in water with my gun often times hunting in the rain or my shot gun bird hunting. Then I proceed to clean the gun I use frog lube but any clp will be fine. When completely dry and cleaned I spray with a standard water repellant nothing more than silicon spray. With all the care I can give some corrosion will occur I just slow it way down.

    I don't know anything about chlorine so the products I use should be checked for a reaction to chlorine. Sweat on the other hand is nothing more than bird hunting at the ocean. My carry gun suffers the most abuse from dust dirt sweat and water and it still looks presentable after six years of carry.

    Bill

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    Distinguished Member Array chuckusaret's Avatar
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    I had a Charter Arms .44 locked away in a small gun safe on the boat for many years, sprayed with either Remington Oil, WD40 or two stroke oil (mostly) on occasion and never a rust problem. The foam within the safe was also saturated in oil. This gun was wiped down and was fired each and every time the boat was put to water, never cleaned just re-oiled. I do have a cheap Chinese off brand short barreled shotgun that did not fair well on the boat after only a very short time in the salt air environment regardless of maintenance or type of oil used. Cheap gun, cheap metal parts, poor finish=Junk from the get go and should be expected.
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    Senior Member Array kb2wji's Avatar
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    I've had my duty sig 220 for about 5 or 6 years. It's been drenched quite regularly. It's been submerged a couple times as well. There isn't a speck of rust anywhere on it or in it. I detail strip it once a year, but will field strip and wipe down every day if it got wet. It's got scratches and battle wounds all over it that effect the finish, and still hasn't rusted. Take em down, light coat of oil, and quit worrying :) On a side note, WD40 never gets anywhere near my gun. I don't want that one rogue wd40 molecule working its way into my primer and causing a FTF. Maybe i'm paranoid, but my gun keeps me safe, so I protect it as best I can

    As far as the chlorine goes, that stinks. I'm rarely near a pool with a gun, so I cant comment intelligently. I can however tell you a story about my wristwatch. I never take it off (ever). If I go in the pool / ocean, I will rinse it with clean water and brush it lightly with an old toothbrush. Otherwise the chemicals / salt will start to wear and eat at the finish and seals. Not saying use water on your gun, but if exposed to chlorine or salt, just clean it off and i'm sure you'll be fine. Don't let it sit on the finish too long.
    LouisianaMan likes this.

  12. #11
    Distinguished Member Array Diddle's Avatar
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    I do industrial equipment repair which subjects my firearm to a multitude of contaminants. I do a once a week cleaning with Gunzilla and have no rust issues what so ever. I will admit that if I have been working on commercial water softeners or brine tanks (think salt) I clean my firearm as soon as I possibly can. generally after work the same day.

    Best!
    Diddle
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    VIP Member Array Kennydale's Avatar
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    DSCN4718c.jpgDSCN4719c.jpg Hot STEAMY Houston Tank top Tee, then 3 Speed Holster, Then over garment. even when i miss the range for a long period of time, I still like to do a gun cleaning and lube about every two to three weeks.

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array Kennydale's Avatar
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    Note: After reading the above posts, I think i will clean and lube weekly. Especially during Summer in Houston.
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  15. #14
    Member Array MLittle's Avatar
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    Cleaning your edc once a week, preferably after you've been to the range is probably the best preventative measure you can take. I always wipe the outside of mine down with an oily cloth before it goes in the holster and I've never had any rust problems.

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    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    As Neil Young says, "Rust Never Sleeps" & I've yet to discover a fool-proof, lazy man's solution. I have, however, found an old-school, badger bristle shaving brush spreads my what-ever "lubricant-of-choice" almost perfectly.
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