my shooting is improving

This is a discussion on my shooting is improving within the Defensive Carry Guns forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; When I started shooting this year, my stance, grip, sight acquisition, trigger control, and recoil management was terrible. I put 150 rnds through my g19 ...

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    Member Array missymay's Avatar
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    my shooting is improving

    When I started shooting this year, my stance, grip, sight acquisition, trigger control, and recoil management was terrible. I put 150 rnds through my g19 today, and I've definitely come along way. I only get to the range once or twice a month, but I've been doing a lot of dry fire practice at home, and I've learned a lot from the internet, and watching you tube videos. And this forum is very helpful too; I've learned a lot from you folks.
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    Member Array TattooedGunner's Avatar
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    Glad to hear you are improving.

    If you get a chance, take a training class. It will really dial you in. You don't have to go to one of those week long $1000 deals either, a one or two day class helps a ton.


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    Good to hear you are improving . I am about the same and stay average . Also i tend to shoot to the left a bit .
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    VIP Member Array smolck's Avatar
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    Congrats! The best thing I ever did to help my shooting of Glocks was dry fire practice. Once you "learn" the trigger, it is easy to shoot them well.
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Glad to hear you are improving. My suggestion is " do not" take a self defense training class that involves using any skill sets you have not mastered.

    This is like telling a new mountain bike enthusiast to sign up for a BMX trial.
    Or a new motorcyclist to buy a 175 HP for his first bike and enter the Man of Isle race.

    You get the idea.

    Perfect you sight picture, and alignment with steady trigger squeeze until a clean surprise break and an undisturbed sight pic are common. Then apply that to live fire until you are shooting one ragged hole at 5 yards, then move back to 10 and do the same.

    From there work on your draw and presentation until you learn to have a proper firing grip, and then work that in to include your dry fire.

    When you can draw, and fire, and consistently make good center of mass hits at the range, then you are ready to attend a combat shooting course.

    I applaud your effort, and want to encourage you. A few months of the above listed traing at home and range, and you will be there.

    The worst thing that anyone can do, is get ahead of themselves.
    The mastery of fundementals will pay off big, and you will quickly out gun those who attempted to take shortcuts.
    Hats off to ya!
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    VIP Member Array StormRhydr's Avatar
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    People seem to forget that good training trains the shooters mind, as well as what to do with their gun, and body. I highly recommend more training. And unlike many who advise against such training, I have taken it.

    There are nationally known training outfits. They all have web sites, and that seems to help people decide on the additional training they desire. Id recommend picking one of them. Perhaps starting with a two day course. Well worth the money.

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    Senior Member Array Caertaker's Avatar
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    Grats on your results! Amazing how hard work and dedication pays off. Such a well kept secret...
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    Quote Originally Posted by welder516 View Post
    Good to hear you are improving . I am about the same and stay average . Also i tend to shoot to the left a bit .
    Just side step to the right and should be fine?
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    Member Array raasnio's Avatar
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    My shooting has improved as well. What has helped me the most is an ex-police officer who works at the shooting range walked up to me and asked if he could give me some advice. I replied that he could and he proceeded to show me how my stance was all wrong. After that everything improved drastically as I was much more consistent. I have a ways to go before I'm happy with it, but I feel confident that at the confrontation distance that matters most I can definitely hit my target where I want to.

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    Fundamentals first. I don't believe there are "beginner" and "advanced" handgun shooting techniques. There are simply those who have dedicated time and effort to learning the fundamentals and apply them to EVERY shot they take.

    The fastest, most accurate shooters in the world still have to do the same things to make those astounding shots. Grip, sight alignment and trigger control are as important for them as they are for the rest of us.

    Keep working at it.

    Perfection is a journey, not a destination.
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    Good to see your skills improving, isn't it?

    Just a comment or two on practice. Unless you're shooting .22, 150 rounds in one session is a lot, and when I see shooters - especially new ones - cranking out box after box of ammo, I also see fatigue.

    I like the fact that you've seen the value of dry-fire practice. I suggest that to help solidify your skills, each time you head to the range for practice, you have specific objectives in mind. Look on line for Clint Smith's "One Hundred Rounds" article that speaks to structured practice with limited ammo.

    Lastly, as with a lot of other skills that are acquired by training and mastered with practice, neither start out nor finish your practice sessions with the hardest drill. Although it's a mental thing, it really is beneficial to finish up with a drill you do well, so you leave the range on a relative high note, rather than frustrated because you couldn't do a perfect Mozambique in under 2 seconds...

    And keep it fun!
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    Look on line for Clint Smith's "One Hundred Rounds" article that speaks to structured practice with limited ammo.
    Bob Ford (acparmed, on DC) posted some good info on training regimen, back in 2006: Ken Hackathorn and Clint Smith Skill Drills.
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    VIP Member Array Snub44's Avatar
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    ...CONGRATS!!!


    ...these charts helped me a lot...maybe they'll give you some tips:

    SHOOTING ERRORS CHART - Google Search

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    VIP Member Array smolck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Glad to hear you are improving. My suggestion is " do not" take a self defense training class that involves using any skill sets you have not mastered.

    This is like telling a new mountain bike enthusiast to sign up for a BMX trial.
    Or a new motorcyclist to buy a 175 HP for his first bike and enter the Man of Isle race.

    You get the idea.

    Perfect you sight picture, and alignment with steady trigger squeeze until a clean surprise break and an undisturbed sight pic are common. Then apply that to live fire until you are shooting one ragged hole at 5 yards, then move back to 10 and do the same.

    From there work on your draw and presentation until you learn to have a proper firing grip, and then work that in to include your dry fire.

    When you can draw, and fire, and consistently make good center of mass hits at the range, then you are ready to attend a combat shooting course.

    I applaud your effort, and want to encourage you. A few months of the above listed traing at home and range, and you will be there.

    The worst thing that anyone can do, is get ahead of themselves.
    The mastery of fundementals will pay off big, and you will quickly out gun those who attempted to take shortcuts.
    Hats off to ya!
    This is some of the best advice I have ever read and a reminder to myself as well. Well said.
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    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    Glockman, Raasnio, and Gasmitty all offer great advice above. I commend and applaud them for outstanding comments to this.

    To underline these points, training is good and study is important.

    Ask a range office for a critique and some tips. You have a lot of things to work on, as you know. Sight picture, aim, stance, breathing, trigger control, grip - a large number of variables to contend with. The range pro might just give you one pointer that ties a lot of things together. Could be as simple as "push your right shoulder forward a bit," and bingo - you're dialed in.

    And yes, 150 rounds at an outing might be overkill. Sometimes I'll just shoot 25. If you're really making those rounds count, you won't need that many to work on a skill, to refine a technique. This applies to other disciplines, too.

    If you're doing something wrong while swinging a golf club, swinging it 1000 times won't fix the problem. Same with handgunning. This book is quite helpful.

    Some of the best practice I've done is at IPSC and IDPA competition, because being on the move and operating under stress will tend to magnify flaws in your technique and help you isolate. Range time is where you focus on single items and examine them under the microscope.

    For example: On one outing, you might want to focus solely on trigger break and reset. Just that. Accuracy can be way secondary. Won't take a lot of rounds to work on that, if you concentrate hard. The real work is going on inside your head. And it's something dry-firing can't emulate. Glad you're on a good road. Sounds like you'll be at your destination soon.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

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